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Andin, Josefine
Publikasjoner (10 av 36) Visa alla publikasjoner
Cardin, V., Rudner, M., Ferraz De Oliveira, R., Andin, J., Beese, L., Woll, B. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). A working memory role for superior temporal cortex in deaf individuals independently of linguistic content. In: : . Paper presented at Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>A working memory role for superior temporal cortex in deaf individuals independently of linguistic content
Vise andre…
2015 (engelsk)Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Studies of sign languages have been used to test traditional cognitive models of working memory (WM) that distinguish between verbal and visuospatial WM (e.g. Baddeley, 2003), without considering that sign languages operate in the visuospatial domain. Previous studies have shown that WM mental representations and processes are largely similar for signed and spoken languages (e.g. Rönnberg et al., 2004). However, it is not clear to what extent visual WM processes aid and support sign language WM.

Here we characterise the neural substrates supporting sign language and visual WM, and the mechanisms that subserve differential processing for signers and for deaf individuals. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment with three groups of participants: deaf native signers, hearing native signers and hearing non-signers. Participants performed a 2-back WM task and a control task on two sets of stimuli: signs from British Sign Language or non-sense objects. Stimuli were composed of point-lights to control for differences in visual features.

Our results show activation in a fronto-parietal network for WM processing in all groups, independently of stimulus type, in agreement with previous literature. We also replicate previous findings in deaf signers showing a stronger right posterior superior temporal cortex (STC) activation for visuospatial processing, and stronger bilateral STC activation for sign language stimuli.

Group comparisons further reveal stronger activations in STC for WM in deaf signers, but not for the groups of hearing individuals. This activation is independent of the linguistic content of the stimuli, being observed in both WM conditions: signs and objects. These results suggest a cognitive role for STC in deaf signers, beyond sign language processing.

HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123240 (URN)
Konferanse
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-12-09 Laget: 2015-12-09 Sist oppdatert: 2018-01-10
Signoret, C., Andin, J., Johnsrude, I. & Rudner, M. (2015). Cumulative effects of prior knowledge and semantic coherence during speech perception: an fMRI study. In: : . Paper presented at The Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Neurobiology of Language Conference, Chicago, IL, USA, October 15-17, 2015 (pp. 51-51).
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Cumulative effects of prior knowledge and semantic coherence during speech perception: an fMRI study
2015 (engelsk)Konferansepaper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Semantic coherence and prior knowledge enhance perceptual clarity of degraded speech. Recent study by our team has shown that these two effects interact such that the perceptual clarity of noise-vocoded speech (NVS) is still enhanced by semantic coherence when prior knowledge is available from text cues and prior knowledge enhances perceptual clarity of NVS even when semantic coherence is low (Signoret et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the neural correlates of this interaction. We predicted 1) an effect of matching cues for both sentences with high and low semantic coherence in left-lateralized perisylvian areas (Zekveld et al., 2012) and right superior temporal gyrus (Wild et al., 2012), but stronger for low than for high coherent sentences since more resources are required to process sentences with low semantic coherence in the left inferior frontal gyrus (Obleser and Kotz, 2010) and 2) an effect of semantic coherence in temporal and inferior frontal cortex (Lau et al., 2008). The additive effect of semantic coherence when matching cues were provided should be observed in the angular gyrus (Obleser and Kotz, 2010). Twenty participants (age; M=25.14, SD=5.01) listened to sentences and performed an unrelated attentional task during sparse-imaging fMRI. The sentences had high or low semantic coherence, and were either clear, degraded (6-band NV) or unintelligible (1-band NV). Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either a matching cue or a consonant string. Preliminary results revealed significant main effects of Cue (F(1,228) = 21.26; p < .05 FWE) in the left precentral gyrus, the left inferior frontal gyrus and the left middle temporal gyrus confirming the results of Zekveld et al (2012), but neither the main effect of Coherence nor the interaction between Cue and Coherence survived FWE correction. In accordance with our predictions, contrasts revealed a greater effect of matching cues for low than for high coherent sentences (t(19) = 6.25; p < .05 FWE) in the left superior temporal gyrus as well as left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44 and 45), suggesting greater involvement of both top-down and bottom-up processing mechanisms during integration of prior knowledge with the auditory signal when sentence coherence is lower. There was a marginally greater effect of semantic coherence (t(19) = 3.58; p < .001unc) even when matching cues were provided in the left angular gyrus, the left middle frontal gyrus and the right superior frontal gyrus, suggesting greater involvement of top-down activation of semantic concepts, executive processes and the phonological store during integration of prior knowledge with the auditory signal when the semantic content of the speech is more readily available.

HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123961 (URN)
Konferanse
The Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Neurobiology of Language Conference, Chicago, IL, USA, October 15-17, 2015
Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-01-15 Laget: 2016-01-15 Sist oppdatert: 2017-11-06bibliografisk kontrollert
Andin, J., Dahlström, Ö., Fransson, P., Rönnberg, J. & Rudner, M. (2015). Deaf signers are less reliant than hearing non-signers on fact retrieval from verbal long term memory during arithmetic processing: fMRI evidence. In: : . Paper presented at Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Chicago, Illinois, October 15-17, 2015..
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Deaf signers are less reliant than hearing non-signers on fact retrieval from verbal long term memory during arithmetic processing: fMRI evidence
Vise andre…
2015 (engelsk)Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123288 (URN)
Konferanse
Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Chicago, Illinois, October 15-17, 2015.
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-12-09 Laget: 2015-12-09 Sist oppdatert: 2018-04-07
Cardin, V., Rudner, M., Ferraz de Oliveira, R., Su, M., Andin, J., Beese, L., . . . Rönnberg, J. (2015). Does the superior temporal cortex have a role in cognitive control as a consequence of cross-modal reorganization?. In: : . Paper presented at Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Chicago, Illinois, October 15-17, 2015.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Does the superior temporal cortex have a role in cognitive control as a consequence of cross-modal reorganization?
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2015 (engelsk)Konferansepaper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Fagfellevurdert)
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123289 (URN)
Konferanse
Seventh Annual Meeting of the Society for the Neurobiology of Language, Chicago, Illinois, October 15-17, 2015
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-12-09 Laget: 2015-12-09 Sist oppdatert: 2018-01-10
Andin, J., Dahlström, Ö., Fransson, P., Rönnberg, J. & Rudner, M. (2015). Greater reliance on magnitude manipulation during mental arithmetic in deaf signers compared to hearing non-signers: fMRI evidence. In: : . Paper presented at Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Greater reliance on magnitude manipulation during mental arithmetic in deaf signers compared to hearing non-signers: fMRI evidence
Vise andre…
2015 (engelsk)Konferansepaper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to verbal processing of numbers, whereas magnitude processing seems unaffected by deafness. Neuroimaging evidence from hearing individuals suggests that verbal processing of numbers engages primarily left angular gyrus (lAG), whereas magnitude processing engages primarily the horizontal portion of the right intraparietal sulcus (rHIP). In a ROI analysis of brain imaging data from 16 adult deaf signers and 16 adult hearing non-signers, who did not differ on sex, age or education, we examined if activity in lAG and rHIP changed as a result of task (multiplication vs subtraction) and group (deaf signers and hearing non-signers). We found a significant main effect of brain region (F(1,30) = 117.00, p < .001, η_p^2 = .80) and an interaction effect between region and group (F(1,30) = 20.70, p < .001, η_p^2 = .41). Further analyses showed that there were no significant differences in average activation between groups in lAG (F(1,30) = 0.16, p = .70). However, in rHIP deaf signers showed significantly greater average activation compared to non-signers (F(1,30) = 15.20, p < .001, η_p^2 = .34). There were no significant differences in activation between subtraction and multiplication (F(1,30) = 0.66, p = .42) and no behavioural differences between groups (F(1,30) = 1.70, p = .20). These results suggest that when engaging in arithmetic tasks deaf signers successfully make use of qualitatively difference processes, compared to hearing non-signers, with stronger emphasis on brain regions relating to magnitude manipulation.

HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123246 (URN)
Konferanse
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-12-09 Laget: 2015-12-09 Sist oppdatert: 2018-04-07
Andin, J., Fransson, P., Rönnberg, J. & Rudner, M. (2015). Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network. Brain and Language, 143, 97-105
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Phonology and arithmetic in the language-calculation network
2015 (engelsk)Inngår i: Brain and Language, ISSN 0093-934X, E-ISSN 1090-2155, Vol. 143, s. 97-105Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Arithmetic and language processing involve similar neural networks, but the relative engagement remains unclear. In the present study we used fMRI to compare activation for phonological, multiplication and subtraction tasks, keeping the stimulus material constant, within a predefined language-calculation network including left inferior frontal gyrus and angular gyrus (AG) as well as superior parietal lobule and the intraparietal sulcus bilaterally. Results revealed a generally left lateralized activation pattern within the language-calculation network for phonology and a bilateral activation pattern for arithmetic, and suggested regional differences between tasks. In particular, we found a more prominent role for phonology than arithmetic in pars opercularis of the left inferior frontal gyrus but domain generality in pars triangularis. Parietal activation patterns demonstrated greater engagement of the visual and quantity systems for calculation than language. This set of findings supports the notion of a common, but regionally differentiated, language-calculation network. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2015
Emneord
Phonology; Arithmetic; Brain imaging; Perisylvian language network
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117794 (URN)10.1016/j.bandl.2015.02.004 (DOI)000352659600010 ()25797099 (PubMedID)
Merknad

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2005-1353].

The previous status of this article was Manuscript and the working title was Phonological but not arithmetic processing engages left posterior inferior frontal gyrus.

Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-05-11 Laget: 2015-05-08 Sist oppdatert: 2018-01-11bibliografisk kontrollert
Signoret, C., Andin, J., Johnsrude, I. & Rudner, M. (2015). The interplay between prior knowledge and semantic coherence during processing of degraded speech: an fMRI study. In: Abstract book: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication. Paper presented at Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHSCOM2015), Linköping, Sweden, 14–17 June 2015 (pp. 181-181).
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The interplay between prior knowledge and semantic coherence during processing of degraded speech: an fMRI study
2015 (engelsk)Inngår i: Abstract book: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2015, s. 181-181Konferansepaper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Degraded speech is rendered more intelligible both by semantic coherence and preceding text cues. Recently, we showed that the perceptual clarity of noise-vo-coded speech (NVS) is still enhanced by semantic coherence when cues are provided and that prior knowledge enhances perceptual clarity of NVS when semantic coherence is low (Signoret et al., 2015). Here, we investigated the neural correlates of this interaction. Twenty participants listened to sentences and performed an unrelated attentional task during sparse-imaging fMRI. The sentences had high or low semantic coherence, and were either clear, degraded (6-band NV) or unintelligible (1-band NV). Each spoken word was preceded (200 ms) by either a matching cue or a consonant string. Preliminary results revealed significant main effects of both Coherence and Cue in the superior temporal gyrus bilaterally and a significant interaction between Coherence and Cue when speech was degraded, in superior and middle temporal gyri bilaterally and left precentral gyrus. Investigation of this interaction revealed greater activation for high compared to low coherent sentences when cues were provided in the left-lateralized regions and greater activation without than with cues when semantic coherence was low in bilateral regions. The opposite contrasts elicited no significant activation. This pattern of results indicates that the increases in perceptual clarity of NVS attributable to semantic coherence and prior knowledge are supported by similar neural mechanisms organized in bilateral temporal regions, but that when perceptual clarity is optimized by both factors, it is supported by left-lateralized mechanisms.

HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123963 (URN)
Konferanse
Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHSCOM2015), Linköping, Sweden, 14–17 June 2015
Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-01-15 Laget: 2016-01-15 Sist oppdatert: 2017-11-06bibliografisk kontrollert
Cardin, V., Rudner, M., De Oliveira, R., Andin, J., Beese, L. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Working memory and crossmodal plasticity in congenitally deaf individuals. In: : . Paper presented at Neuroscience, Chicago, IL, October 17-21, 2015.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Working memory and crossmodal plasticity in congenitally deaf individuals
Vise andre…
2015 (engelsk)Konferansepaper, Oral presentation only (Annet vitenskapelig)
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126039 (URN)
Konferanse
Neuroscience, Chicago, IL, October 17-21, 2015
Tilgjengelig fra: 2016-03-11 Laget: 2016-03-11 Sist oppdatert: 2018-01-10
Andin, J., Fransson, P., Dahlström, Ö., Rönnberg, J. & Rudner, M. (2014). Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Deaf signers use magnitude manipulatioin strategies for mulitplication: fMRI evidence
Vise andre…
2014 (engelsk)Manuskript (preprint) (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

Evidence suggests that the lag reported in mathematics for deaf signers derives from difficulties related to the verbal system of number processing as described in the triple code model. For hearing individuals the verbal system has been shown to be recruited for both arithmetic and language tasks. In the present study we investigate for the first time neuronal representations of arithmetic in deaf signers. We examine if the neural network supporting arithmetic and language, including the horizontal portion of the intraparietal sulcus (HIPS), the superior parietal lobule (SPL) bilaterally, the left angular gyrus (AG), pars opercularis (POPE) and pars triangularis (PTRI) of the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), is differently recruited for deaf and hearing individuals. Imaging data were collected from 16 deaf signers and 16 well-matched hearing nonsigners, using the same stimulus material for all tasks, but with different cues. During multiplication, deaf signers recruited rHIPS more than hearing non-signers, suggesting greater involvement of magnitude manipulation processes related to the quantity system, whereas there was no evidence that the verbal system was recruited. Further, there was no support for the notion of a common representation of phonology for sign and speech as previously suggested.

Emneord
Arithmetic; phonology; fMRI; deaf; sign language; magnitude manipulation
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111560 (URN)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-10-24 Laget: 2014-10-24 Sist oppdatert: 2018-04-07bibliografisk kontrollert
Andin, J., Rönnberg, J. & Rudner, M. (2014). Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic. Learning and individual differences, 32, 246-253
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Deaf signers use phonology to do arithmetic
2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Learning and individual differences, ISSN 1041-6080, E-ISSN 1873-3425, Vol. 32, s. 246-253Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Deaf students generally lag several years behind hearing peers in arithmetic, but little is known about the mechanisms behind this. In the present study we investigated how phonological skills interact with arithmetic. Eighteen deaf signers and eighteen hearing non-signers took part in an experiment that manipulated arithmetic and phonological knowledge in the language modalities of sign and speech. Independent tests of alphabetical and native language phonological skills were also administered. There was no difference in performance between groups on subtraction, but hearing non-signers performed better than deaf signers on multiplication. For the deaf signers but not the hearing non-signers, multiplicative reasoning was associated with both alphabetical and phonological skills. This indicates that deaf signing adults rely on language processes to solve multiplication tasks, possibly because automatization of multiplication is less well established in deaf adults.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2014
Emneord
Deaf signers; Arithmetic; Phonology
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108812 (URN)10.1016/j.lindif.2014.03.015 (DOI)000336820400028 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-07-07 Laget: 2014-07-06 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-05
Organisasjoner