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Olivius, Petri
Publikasjoner (10 av 20) Visa alla publikasjoner
Novozhilova, E., Englund-Johansson, U., Kale, A., Jiao, Y. & Olivius, P. (2015). EFFECTS OF ROCK INHIBITOR Y27632 AND EGFR INHIBITOR PD168393 ON HUMAN NEURAL PRECURSORS CO-CULTURED WITH RAT AUDITORY BRAINSTEM EXPLANT. Neuroscience, 287, 43-54
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>EFFECTS OF ROCK INHIBITOR Y27632 AND EGFR INHIBITOR PD168393 ON HUMAN NEURAL PRECURSORS CO-CULTURED WITH RAT AUDITORY BRAINSTEM EXPLANT
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2015 (engelsk)Inngår i: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 287, s. 43-54Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Hearing function lost by degeneration of inner ear spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the auditory nervous system could potentially be compensated by cellular replacement using suitable donor cells. Donor cell-derived neuronal development with functional synaptic formation with auditory neurons of the cochlear nucleus (CN) in the brainstem is a prerequisite for a successful transplantation. Here a rat auditory brainstem explant culture system was used as a screening platform for donor cells. The explants were co-cultured with human neural precursor cells (HNPCs) to determine HNPCs developmental potential in the presence of environmental cues characteristic for the auditory brainstem region in vitro. We explored effects of pharmacological inhibition of GTPase Rho with its effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling on the co-cultures. Pharmacological agents ROCK inhibitor Y27632 and EGFR blocker PD168393 were tested. Effect of the treatment on explant penetration by green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled HNPCs was evaluated based on the following criteria: number of GFP-HNPCs located within the explant; distance migrated by the GFP-HNPCs deep into the explant; length of the GFP+/neuronal class III beta-tubulin (TUJ1)+ processes developed and phenotypes displayed. In a short 2-week co-culture both inhibitors had growth-promoting effects on HNPCs, prominent in neurite extension elongation. Significant enhancement of migration and in-growth of HNPCs into the brain slice tissue was only observed in Y27632-treated co-cultures. Difference between Y27632- and PD168393-treated HNPCs acquiring neuronal fate was significant, though not different from the fates acquired in control co-culture. Our data suggest the presence of inhibitory mechanisms in the graft-host environment of the auditory brainstem slice co-culture system with neurite growth arresting properties which can be modulated by administration of signaling pathways antagonists. Therefore the co-culture system can be utilized for screens of donor cells and compounds regulating neuronal fate determination. (C) 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2015
Emneord
hearing; organotypic culture; neuronal restoration; Y27632; PD168393
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114975 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroscience.2014.12.009 (DOI)000348759100006 ()25514049 (PubMedID)
Merknad

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2008-2822]; Marianne and Marcus Wallenbergs Foundation; Petrus and Augusta Hedlunds Foundation; Swedish Association of Hard of Hearing People; Acta Otolaryngologicas Foundation; Karolinska Institutet Foundations

Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-03-10 Laget: 2015-03-06 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-04
Jiao, Y., Palmgren, B., Novozhilova, E., Englund Johansson, U., Spieles-Engemann, A. L., Kale, A., . . . Olivius, P. (2014). BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage. BioMed Research International, 2014, 1-11
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage
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2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: BioMed Research International, ISSN 2314-6133, E-ISSN 2314-6141, Vol. 2014, s. 1-11Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM). Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel), in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of beta-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC) integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN).

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2014
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114033 (URN)10.1155/2014/356415 (DOI)000347810500001 ()25243135 (PubMedID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-02-05 Laget: 2015-02-05 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-05
Kaiser, A., Kale, A., Novozhilova, E., Siratirakun, P., Aquino, J. B., Thonabulsombat, C., . . . Olivius, P. (2014). Brain stern slice conditioned medium contains endogenous BDNF and GDNF that affect neural crest boundary cap cells in co-culture. Brain Research, 1566, 12-23
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Brain stern slice conditioned medium contains endogenous BDNF and GDNF that affect neural crest boundary cap cells in co-culture
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2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Brain Research, ISSN 0006-8993, E-ISSN 1872-6240, Vol. 1566, s. 12-23Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Conditioned medium (CM), made by collecting medium after a few days in cell culture and then re-using it to further stimulate other cells, is a known experimental concept since the 1950s. Our group has explored this technique to stimulate the performance of cells in culture in general, and to evaluate stem- and progenitor cell aptitude for auditory nerve repair enhancement in particular. As compared to other mediums, all primary endpoints in our published experimental settings have weighed in favor of conditioned culture medium, where we have shown that conditioned culture medium has a stimulatory effect on cell survival. In order to explore the reasons for this improved survival we set out to analyze the conditioned culture medium. We utilized ELISA kits to investigate whether brain stem (BS) slice CM contains any significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). We further looked for a donor cell with progenitor characteristics that would be receptive to BDNF and GDNF. We chose the well-documented boundary cap (BC) progenitor cells to be tested in our in vitro co-culture setting together with cochlear nucleus (CN) of the BS. The results show that BS CM contains BDNF and GDNF and that survival of BC cells, as well as BC cell differentiation into neurons, were enhanced when BS CM were used. Altogether, we conclude that BC cells transplanted into a BDNF and GDNF rich environment could be suitable for treatment of a traumatized or degenerated auditory nerve.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2014
Emneord
Hearing; Auditory brainstem slice; Organotypic culture; Neural crest; Boundary cap cells; Neuronal restoration
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108166 (URN)10.1016/j.brainres.2014.04.006 (DOI)000336824900002 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2014-06-26 Laget: 2014-06-26 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-05
Novozhilova, E., Olivius, P., Siratirakun, P., Lundberg, C. & Englund-Johansson, U. (2013). Neuronal Differentiation and Extensive Migration of Human Neural Precursor Cells following Co-Culture with Rat Auditory Brainstem Slices. PLoS ONE, 8(3)
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Neuronal Differentiation and Extensive Migration of Human Neural Precursor Cells following Co-Culture with Rat Auditory Brainstem Slices
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2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, nr 3Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Congenital or acquired hearing loss is often associated with a progressive degeneration of the auditory nerve (AN) in the inner ear. The AN is composed of processes and axons of the bipolar spiral ganglion neurons (SGN), forming the connection between the hair cells in the inner ear cochlea and the cochlear nuclei (CN) in the brainstem (BS). Therefore, replacement of SGNs for restoring the AN to improve hearing function in patients who receive a cochlear implantation or have severe AN malfunctions is an attractive idea. A human neural precursor cell (HNPC) is an appropriate donor cell to investigate, as it can be isolated and expanded in vitro with maintained potential to form neurons and glia. We recently developed a post-natal rodent in vitro auditory BS slice culture model including the CN and the central part of the AN for initial studies of candidate cells. Here we characterized the survival, distribution, phenotypic differentiation, and integration capacity of HNPCs into the auditory circuitry in vitro. HNPC aggregates (spheres) were deposited adjacent to or on top of the BS slices or as a monoculture (control). The results demonstrate that co-cultured HNPCs compared to monocultures (1) survive better, (2) distribute over a larger area, (3) to a larger extent and in a shorter time-frame form mature neuronal and glial phenotypes. HNPC showed the ability to extend neurites into host tissue. Our findings suggest that the HNPC-BS slice co-culture is appropriate for further investigations on the integration capacity of HNPCs into the auditory circuitry.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Public Library of Science, 2013
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93403 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0057301 (DOI)000318334500015 ()
Merknad

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council|2008-2822|Marianne and Marcus Wallenbergs Foundation||Petrus and Augusta Hedlunds Foundation||Swedish Association of Hard of Hearing People||Acta Otolaryngologicas Foundation||Foundation Tysta Skolan||Ollie and Elof Ericssons Foundation for Medical Research||Karolinska Institutet Foundations||Medical faculty||Lund University||

Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-05-31 Laget: 2013-05-31 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-06
Herlenius, E., Thonabulsombat, C., Forsberg, D., Jäderstad, J., Jäderstad, L., Björk, L. & Olivius, P. (2012). Functional stem cell integration assessed by organotypic slice cultures. Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology, 1(SUPPL.23)
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Functional stem cell integration assessed by organotypic slice cultures
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2012 (engelsk)Inngår i: Current Protocols in Stem Cell Biology, ISSN 1941-7322, Vol. 1, nr SUPPL.23Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Re-formation or preservation of functional, electrically active neural networks has been proffered as one of the goals of stem cell-mediated neural therapeutics. A primary issue for a cell therapy approach is the formation of functional contacts between the implanted cells and the host tissue. Therefore, it is of fundamental interest to establish protocols that allow us to delineate a detailed time course of grafted stem cell survival, migration, differentiation, integration, and functional interaction with the host. One option for in vitro studies is to examine the integration of exogenous stem cells into an existing active neuronal network in ex vivo organotypic cultures. Organotypic cultures leave the structural integrity essentially intact while still allowing the microenvironment to be carefully controlled. This allows detailed studies over time of cellular responses and cellcell interactions, which are not readily performed in vivo. This unit describes procedures for using organotypic slice cultures as ex vivo model systems for studying neural stem cell and embryonic stem cell engraftment and communication with CNS host tissue.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
John Wiley & Sons, 2012
Emneord
Brainstem; Engraftment; Integration; Interaction; Neural stem cells; Neuroprotection; Organotypic culture; Roller drum; Stoppini; Striatum; Transplantation
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-101041 (URN)10.1002/9780470151808.sc02d13s23 (DOI)23154935 (PubMedID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-11-19 Laget: 2013-11-18 Sist oppdatert: 2013-11-28
Palmgren, B., Jiao, Y., Novozhilova, E., Stupp, S. I. & Olivius, P. (2012). Survival, migration and differentiation of mouse tau-GFP embryonic stem cells transplanted into the rat auditory nerve. Experimental Neurology, 235(2), 599-609
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Survival, migration and differentiation of mouse tau-GFP embryonic stem cells transplanted into the rat auditory nerve
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2012 (engelsk)Inngår i: Experimental Neurology, ISSN 0014-4886, E-ISSN 1090-2430, Vol. 235, nr 2, s. 599-609Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Stem cells have been investigated as treatment for a variety of diagnoses such as Parkinsons disease, Alzheimers disease and spinal cord injuries. Here, we investigated the possibility of using stem cells as a replacement therapy for lesions of the auditory nerve (AN). We transplanted tau-GFP mouse embryonic stem cells into the AN either by the internal auditory meatus or via the modiolus in rats that had been previously deafened by application of beta-bungarotoxin to the round window niche. We investigated the effect of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) on cell transplant survival and differentiation. Additionally chondroitinase ABC (ChABC), a digestive enzyme that cleaves the core chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, was used in order to promote possible migration of cells and axons through the transitional zone. A bioactive isoleucine-lysine-valine-alanine-valine (IKVAV) peptide amphiphile (PA) nanofiber gel was applied around the cell injection site. This nanofiber gel has been shown to promote neural differentiation and other similar gels have been used to encapsulate and release proteins. Three weeks after injection, transplanted cells were found in the scala tympani, the modiolus, the AN trunk and the brain stem. As compared to cell transplantation and gel only, BDNF content in the PA gel increased cell survival and neuronal differentiation. In the animals treated with ChABC we observed extensive migration of cells through the transitional zone to or from the CNS.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2012
Emneord
Stem cell, Cell transplantation, Auditory nerve, Brain derived neurotrophic factor, Chondroitinase, Peptide amphiphile nanofiber, Transitional zone
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78267 (URN)10.1016/j.expneurol.2012.03.014 (DOI)000304177800023 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-06-08 Laget: 2012-06-08 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-07
Palmgren, B., Jin, Z., Jiao, Y., Kostyszyn, B. & Olivius, P. (2011). Horseradish peroxidase dye tracing and embryonic statoacoustic ganglion cell transplantation in the rat auditory nerve trunk. BRAIN RESEARCH, 1377, 41-49
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Horseradish peroxidase dye tracing and embryonic statoacoustic ganglion cell transplantation in the rat auditory nerve trunk
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2011 (engelsk)Inngår i: BRAIN RESEARCH, ISSN 0006-8993, Vol. 1377, s. 41-49Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

At present severe damage to hair cells and sensory neurons in the inner ear results in non-treatable auditory disorders. Cell implantation is a potential treatment for various neurological disorders and has already been used in clinical practice. In the inner ear, delivery of therapeutic substances including neurotrophic factors and stem cells provide strategies that in the future may ameliorate or restore hearing impairment. In order to describe a surgical auditory nerve trunk approach, in the present paper we injected the neuronal tracer horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the central part of the nerve by an intra cranial approach. We further evaluated the applicability of the present approach by implanting statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) cells into the same location of the auditory nerve in normal hearing rats or animals deafened by application of p-bungarotoxin to the round window niche. The HRP results illustrate labeling in the cochlear nucleus in the brain stem as well as peripherally in the spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea. The transplanted SAGs were observed within the auditory nerve trunk but no more peripheral than the CNS-PNS transitional zone. Interestingly, the auditory nerve injection did not impair auditory function, as evidenced by the auditory brainstem response. The present findings illustrate that an auditory nerve trunk approach may well access the entire auditory nerve and does not compromise auditory function. We suggest that such an approach might compose a suitable route for cell transplantation into this sensory cranial nerve.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam., 2011
Emneord
Auditory nerve, Horseradish peroxidase, Statoacoustic ganglion, Cell transplantation, Transitional zone
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67031 (URN)10.1016/j.brainres.2010.12.078 (DOI)000288299900004 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2011-03-25 Laget: 2011-03-25 Sist oppdatert: 2013-11-19
Jiao, Y., Novozhilova, E., Karlen, A., Muhr, J. & Olivius, P. (2011). Olfactory ensheathing cells promote neurite outgrowth from co-cultured brain stem slice. EXPERIMENTAL NEUROLOGY, 229(1), 65-71
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Olfactory ensheathing cells promote neurite outgrowth from co-cultured brain stem slice
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2011 (engelsk)Inngår i: EXPERIMENTAL NEUROLOGY, ISSN 0014-4886, Vol. 229, nr 1, s. 65-71Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Cell therapy aiming at the replacement of degenerated neurons is a very attractive approach. By using an established in vitro organotypic brain stem (BS) slice culture we screen for candidate donor cells, some of them being further functionally assessed in in vivo models of sensorineural hearing loss. Both in vitro and in vivo systems show that implanted cells face challenges of survival, targeted migration, differentiation and functional integration with the host tissue. Low success rates are possibly due to the lack of necessary neurotrophic factors, adhesion molecules and guiding cues. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) have been shown to express a number of neurotrophic factors and to promote axonal growth through cell to cell interactions. In the present study we co-cultured OECs with organotypic BS slice in order to see if OECs can serve as a facilitator when screening candidate donor cells in an organotypic culture setup. Here we show that OECs when co-cultured with the auditory BS slice not only promote neurite outgrowth from the cochlear nucleus (CN) region of the BS slice but also support cells by having BS slice axons growing along their processes. These findings further suggest that OECs may enhance survival and targeted migration of candidate donor cells suitable for cell therapy in vitro and in vivo. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Understanding olfactory ensheathing glia and their prospect for nervous system repair.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, 2011
Emneord
OECs, Brain stem slice, Co-culture, Neurite outgrowth
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69160 (URN)10.1016/j.expneurol.2010.10.008 (DOI)000290920300006 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2011-06-17 Laget: 2011-06-17 Sist oppdatert: 2013-11-19
Palmgren, B., Jin, Z., Ma, H., Jiao, Y. & Olivius, P. (2010). β-Bungarotoxin application to the round window: An in vivo deafferentation model of the inner ear. Hearing Research, 265(1-2), 70-76
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>β-Bungarotoxin application to the round window: An in vivo deafferentation model of the inner ear
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2010 (engelsk)Inngår i: Hearing Research, ISSN 0378-5955, E-ISSN 1878-5891, Vol. 265, nr 1-2, s. 70-76Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Hearing impairment can be caused by a primary lesion to the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) with the hair cells kept intact, for example via tumours, trauma or auditory neuropathy. To mimic these conditions in animal models various methods of inflicting damage to the inner ear have been used. However, only a few methods have a selective effect on the SGNs, which is of importance since it might be clinically more relevant to study hearing impairment with the hair cells undamaged. beta-Bungarotoxin is a venom of the Taiwan banded krait, which in vitro has been shown to induce apoptosis in neurons, leaving remaining cochlear cells intact. We wanted to create an in vivo rat model of selective damage to primary auditory neurons. Under deep anaesthesia, 41 rats received beta-Bungarotoxin or saline to the round window niche. At postoperative intervals between days 3 and 21 auditory brainstem response (ABR) measurement, immunohistochemistry, SGN quantification and cochlear surface preparation were performed. The results in the beta-Bungarotoxin-treated ears, as compared with sham-operated ears, show significantly increased ABR thresholds at all postoperative intervals, illustrating a severe to profound hearing loss at all tested frequencies (3.5, 7, 16 and 28 kHz). Quantification of the SGNs showed no obvious reduction in neuronal numbers until 14 days postoperatively. Between days 14 and 21 a significant reduction in SGN numbers was observed. Cochlear surface preparation and immunohistochemistry showed that the hair cells were intact. Our results illustrate that in vivo application of beta-Bungarotoxin to the round window niche is a feasible way of deafening rats by SGN reduction while the hair cells are kept intact.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2010
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-101016 (URN)10.1016/j.heares.2010.02.009 (DOI)000279092000010 ()20184947 (PubMedID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-11-18 Laget: 2013-11-18 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-06bibliografisk kontrollert
Hu, Z., Ulfendahl, M., Prieskorn, D. M., Olivius, P. & Miller, J. M. (2009). Functional Evaluation of a Cell Replacement Therapy in the Inner Ear. Otology and Neurotology, 30(4), 551-558
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Functional Evaluation of a Cell Replacement Therapy in the Inner Ear
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2009 (engelsk)Inngår i: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 30, nr 4, s. 551-558Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

HYPOTHESIS:

Cell replacement therapy in the inner ear will contribute to the functional recovery of hearing loss.

BACKGROUND:

Cell replacement therapy is a potentially powerful approach to replace degenerated or severely damaged spiral ganglion neurons. This study aimed at stimulating the neurite outgrowth of the implanted neurons and enhancing the potential therapeutic of inner ear cell implants.

METHODS:

Chronic electrical stimulation (CES) and exogenous neurotrophic growth factor (NGF) were applied to 46 guinea pigs transplanted with embryonic dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons 4 days postdeafening. The animals were evaluated with the electrically evoked auditory brainstem responses (EABRs) at experimental Days 7, 11, 17, 24, and 31. The animals were euthanized at Day 31, and the inner ears were dissected for immunohistochemistry investigation.

RESULTS:

Implanted DRG cells, identified by enhanced green fluorescent protein fluorescence and a neuronal marker, were found close to Rosenthal canal in the adult inner ear for up to 4 weeks after transplantation. Extensive neurite projections clearly, greater than in nontreated animals, were observed to penetrate the bony modiolus and reach the spiral ganglion region in animals supplied with CES and/or NGF. There was, however, no significant difference in the thresholds of EABRs between DRG-transplanted animals supplied with CES and/or NGF and DRG-transplanted animals without CES or NGF supplement.

CONCLUSION:

The results suggest that CES and/or NGF can stimulate neurite outgrowth from implanted neurons, although based on EABR measurement, these interventions did not induce functional connections to the central auditory pathway. Additional time or novel approaches may enhance functional responsiveness of implanted cells in the adult cochlea

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2009
Emneord
Chronic electrical stimulation; Dorsal root ganglion; Hair cell; Hearing loss; Nerve growth factor; Neurite; Spiral ganglion; Transplantation; Translational research
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-101018 (URN)10.1097/MAO.0b013e31819fe70a (DOI)000276925800019 ()19395986 (PubMedID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2013-11-18 Laget: 2013-11-18 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-06bibliografisk kontrollert
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