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Andersson, Gerhard, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4753-6745
Publications (10 of 626) Show all publications
Pahnke, J., Jansson-Frojmark, M., Andersson, G., Bjureberg, J., Jokinen, J., Bohman, B. & Lundgren, T. (2023). Acceptance and commitment therapy for autistic adults: A randomized controlled pilot study in a psychiatric outpatient setting. Autism, 27(5), 1461-1476
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acceptance and commitment therapy for autistic adults: A randomized controlled pilot study in a psychiatric outpatient setting
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2023 (English)In: Autism, ISSN 1362-3613, E-ISSN 1461-7005, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1461-1476Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Autistic adults are at risk of stress-related psychiatric disorders and reduced life quality due to social, cognitive, and perceptual challenges. Mental health interventions adapted to autistic adults are scarce. Acceptance and commitment therapy has preliminarily indicated health benefits in autistic adults, although it has not been robustly evaluated. Overall, 39 adults (21 males; 21-72 years) with autism spectrum disorder and normal intellectual ability (IQ M = 108.5; SD = 13.5) were randomized to 14 weeks of adapted acceptance and commitment therapy group treatment (NeuroACT) or treatment as usual. The intervention was feasible. Perceived stress and quality of life (primary outcomes), alongside psychological inflexibility, cognitive fusion, cognitive and behavioral avoidance, and autistic mannerism were statistically significantly improved in NeuroACT compared with treatment as usual (d = 0.70-0.90). Clinically significant changes in perceived stress and quality of life were in favor of NeuroACT. Between-group altered depression, anxiety, sleep problems, one quality of life measure, functional impairment, social aspects of autism, and executive difficulties were statistically non-significant. Dropout was slightly higher in NeuroACT. NeuroACT may be a promising treatment for autistic adults with co-existing stress and reduced quality of life. More extensive studies are warranted to evaluate NeuroACT further. Lay abstract Autistic adults are often stressed and feel depressed or anxious. However, mental health programs that are suited for autistic adults are few. Acceptance and commitment therapy is a psychotherapy method that seems to help people feel better, although not thoroughly evaluated in autistic individuals. In this study, 20 autistic adults had 14 weeks of acceptance and commitment therapy group treatment suited for autism (NeuroACT), while 19 autistic adults had ordinary care. The acceptance and commitment therapy group treatment program seemed logical and reasonable to the participants. Also, when comparing the participants in the NeuroACT group with those in the ordinary care group, the NeuroACT participants reported less stress and higher quality of life. Compared to the ordinary care group, they could also manage distressing thoughts better, perceived themselves as more flexible, and did not avoid stressful situations as much as before. However, there was no significant difference between the groups in depression, anxiety, sleep problems, social aspects of autism, everyday functioning, or executive challenges. Slightly more NeuroACT participants did not finish the treatment than ordinary care participants. In conclusion, the NeuroACT program may be a treatment for autistic adults who feel stressed and have reduced quality of life. More studies are needed to see how helpful the NeuroACT program is for autistic adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2023
Keywords
acceptance and commitment therapy; anxiety; autism; cognitive defusion; depression; interventions-psychosocial; behavioral; mindfulness; psychological flexibility; quality of life; stress
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-190933 (URN)10.1177/13623613221140749 (DOI)000896879700001 ()36510817 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-01-09 Created: 2023-01-09 Last updated: 2024-02-08Bibliographically approved
Östling, A.-K. & Andersson, G. (2023). Behandling av beteendeproblem (3ed.). In: Håkan Nyman, Aniko Bartfai (Ed.), Klinisk neuropsykologi: (pp. 485-496). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, Sidorna 485-496
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behandling av beteendeproblem
2023 (English)In: Klinisk neuropsykologi / [ed] Håkan Nyman, Aniko Bartfai, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2023, 3, Vol. Sidorna 485-496, p. 485-496Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Beteendeproblem definieras som ett beteende som hindrar en person och hans/hennes närstående att, efter förutsättningarna, må så bra som möjligt samt leva ett så tillfredsställande liv som möjligt på arbetet, vid studier, i relationer och i övriga sociala sammanhang. Med beteendeproblem menas inte samma sak som beteendestörning, vilket är en term som framförallt används i det psykiatriska diagnosmanualen DSM-5 för att beskriva de beteenden som krävs för att uppfylla olika diagnoskriterier. Det är inte diagnosen som är det viktiga utan hur personen blir bemött utifrån sina förutsättningar, känslomässiga reaktioner och den fysiska och sociala miljöns förutsättningar.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2023 Edition: 3
Keywords
Beteendeterapi
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-191699 (URN)9789144149066 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-02-09 Created: 2023-02-09 Last updated: 2023-02-14Bibliographically approved
Asbrand, J., Gerdes, S., Breedvelt, J., Guidi, J., Hirsch, C., Maercker, A., . . . Bockting, C. (2023). Clinical Psychology and the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Mixed Methods Survey Among Members of the European Association of Clinical Psychology and Psychological Treatment (EACLIPT).. Clinical Psychology in Europe, 5(1), Article ID e8109.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical Psychology and the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Mixed Methods Survey Among Members of the European Association of Clinical Psychology and Psychological Treatment (EACLIPT).
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2023 (English)In: Clinical Psychology in Europe, E-ISSN 2625-3410, Vol. 5, no 1, article id e8109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected people globally both physically and psychologically. The increased demands for mental health interventions provided by clinical psychologists, psychotherapists and mental health care professionals, as well as the rapid change in work setting (e.g., from face-to-face to video therapy) has proven challenging. The current study investigates European clinical psychologists and psychotherapists' views on the changes and impact on mental health care that occurred due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It further aims to explore individual and organizational processes that assist clinical psychologists' and psychotherapists' in their new working conditions, and understand their needs and priorities.

METHOD: Members of the European Association of Clinical Psychology and Psychological Treatment (EACLIPT) were invited (N = 698) to participate in a survey with closed and open questions covering their experiences during the first wave of the pandemic from June to September 2020. Participants (n = 92) from 19 European countries, mostly employed in universities or hospitals, completed the online survey.

RESULTS: Results of qualitative and quantitative analyses showed that clinical psychologists and psychotherapists throughout the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic managed to continue to provide treatments for patients who were experiencing emotional distress. The challenges (e.g., maintaining a working relationship through video treatment) and opportunities (e.g., more flexible working hours) of working through this time were identified.

CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations for mental health policies and professional organizations are identified, such as clear guidelines regarding data security and workshops on conducting video therapy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PsychOpen, 2023
Keywords
blended therapy, clinical psychology, COVID-19, online therapy, psychotherapy, video therapy
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-193635 (URN)10.32872/cpe.8109 (DOI)37064999 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85154046714 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-10 Created: 2023-05-10 Last updated: 2023-09-15Bibliographically approved
Micklitz, H. M., Nagel, Z., Jahn, S., Oertelt-Prigione, S., Andersson, G. & Sander, L. B. (2023). Digital self-help for people experiencing intimate partner violence: a qualitative study on user experiences and needs including people with lived experiences and services providers.. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 1471.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Digital self-help for people experiencing intimate partner violence: a qualitative study on user experiences and needs including people with lived experiences and services providers.
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2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1471Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a prevalent public health issue associated with multiple physical and mental health consequences for survivors. Digital interventions can provide low-threshold support to those experiencing IPV, but existing digital interventions have limited efficacy in improving the safety and mental health of IPV survivors. Digitally adapting an integrative intervention with advocacy-based and psychological content holds promise for increasing the efficacy of digital interventions in the context of IPV.

METHODS: This study examines the needs, acceptability and usability of an integrative digital intervention for people affected by IPV. We used the think-aloud method and semi-structured interviews with a sample of six people with lived experiences of IPV and six service providers. We analyzed the data using thematic analysis.

RESULTS: We identified the increasing general acceptance of digital support tools and the limited capacity of the current support system as societal context factors influencing the acceptance of and needs regarding digital interventions in the context of IPV. An integrative digital self-help intervention offers several opportunities to complement the current support system and to meet the needs of people affected by IPV, including the reduction of social isolation, a space for self-reflection and coping strategies to alleviate the situation. However, potentially ongoing violence, varying stages of awareness and psychological capacities, and as well as the diversity of IPV survivors make it challenging to develop a digital intervention suitable for the target group. We received feedback on the content of the intervention and identified design features required for intervention usability.

CONCLUSION: An integrative digital self-help approach, with appropriate security measures and trauma-informed design, has the potential to provide well-accepted, comprehensive and continuous psychosocial support to people experiencing IPV. A multi-modular intervention that covers different topics and can be personalized to individual user needs could address the diversity of the target population. Providing guidance for the digital intervention is critical to spontaneously address individual needs. Further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of an integrative digital self-help intervention and to explore its feasibility it in different settings and populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2023
Keywords
Advocacy-based intervention, Digital intervention, E-Health, Integrative intervention, Intimate partner violence, Psychological intervention, Trauma-sensitive design, Virtual-delivery of interventions
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-196577 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-16357-5 (DOI)001041489400004 ()37533005 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2023-12-18
Wienicke, F. J., Beutel, M. E., Zwerenz, R., Brähler, E., Fonagy, P., Luyten, P., . . . Driessen, E. (2023). Efficacy and moderators of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data. Clinical Psychology Review, 101, Article ID 102269.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficacy and moderators of short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis of individual participant data
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2023 (English)In: Clinical Psychology Review, ISSN 0272-7358, E-ISSN 1873-7811, Vol. 101, article id 102269Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) is frequently used to treat depression, but it is unclear which patients might benefit specifically. Individual participant data (IPD) meta-analyses can provide more precise effect estimates than conventional meta-analyses and identify patient-level moderators. This IPD meta-analysis examined the efficacy and moderators of STPP for depression compared to control conditions.

METHODS: PubMed, PsycInfo, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched September 1st, 2022, to identify randomized trials comparing STPP to control conditions for adults with depression. IPD were requested and analyzed using mixed-effects models.

RESULTS: IPD were obtained from 11 of the 13 (84.6%) studies identified (n = 771/837, 92.1%; mean age = 40.8, SD = 13.3; 79.3% female). STPP resulted in significantly lower depressive symptom levels than control conditions at post-treatment (d = -0.62, 95%CI [-0.76, -0.47], p < .001). At post-treatment, STPP was more efficacious for participants with longer rather than shorter current depressive episode durations.

CONCLUSIONS: These results support the evidence base of STPP for depression and indicate episode duration as an effect modifier. This moderator finding, however, is observational and requires prospective validation in future large-scale trials.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Depression, Efficacy, Individual participant data Meta-analysis, Moderators, Outcome, Short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-193638 (URN)10.1016/j.cpr.2023.102269 (DOI)000958413900001 ()36958077 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150446223 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: Fund for Psychoanalytic Research of the American Psycho-analytic Association; Netherlands Organization of Scientific Research (NWO) [016]

Available from: 2023-05-10 Created: 2023-05-10 Last updated: 2023-09-15Bibliographically approved
Støre, S. J., Tillfors, M., Wästlund, E., Angelhoff, C., Andersson, G. & Norell, A. (2023). Mind, Body and Machine: Preliminary Study to Explore Predictors of Treatment Response After a Sleep Robot Intervention for Adults with Insomnia.. Nature and Science of Sleep, 15, 567-577
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mind, Body and Machine: Preliminary Study to Explore Predictors of Treatment Response After a Sleep Robot Intervention for Adults with Insomnia.
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2023 (English)In: Nature and Science of Sleep, ISSN 1179-1608, Vol. 15, p. 567-577Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: The study aimed to explore characteristics of responders to a sleep robot intervention for adults with insomnia, and the likelihood that participants responded to the intervention.

METHODS: Data from the intervention and the control group in a randomized waitlist-controlled trial (n = 44) were pooled together after both had undergone the intervention. A repeated measures ANOVA and Friedman tests were used to explore changes over time. Differences in baseline characteristics between responders (n = 13), defined as a reduction of -5 on the Insomnia Severity Index from pre- to post-intervention, and non-responders (n = 31) were analyzed with t-tests and chi-square tests. Finally, logistic regression models were estimated.

RESULTS: Baseline anxiety was the only statistically significant difference between responders and non-responders (p = 0.03). A logistic regression model with anxiety and sleep quality as predictors was statistically significant, correctly classifying 83.3% of cases.

DISCUSSION: The results imply that people with lower anxiety and higher sleep quality at baseline are more likely to report clinically significant improvements in insomnia from the sleep robot intervention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD, 2023
Keywords
anxiety, depression, insomnia, sleep, sleep diary, sleep robot, treatment response
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-196579 (URN)10.2147/NSS.S408714 (DOI)001031039800001 ()37465662 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2023-12-18
Manchaiah, V., Chundu, S., Ratinaud, P., Andersson, G. & Beukes, E. W. (2023). Social Representations of "Tinnitus" and "Health" among Individuals with Tinnitus Seeking Online Psychological Interventions.. Audiology Research, 13(2), 207-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Representations of "Tinnitus" and "Health" among Individuals with Tinnitus Seeking Online Psychological Interventions.
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2023 (English)In: Audiology Research, ISSN 2039-4330, E-ISSN 2039-4349, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 207-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

(1) Objective: Social representations theory (SRT) is a body of theory within social psychology concerned with how individuals, groups, and communities collectively make sense of socially relevant or problematic issues, ideas, and practices. SRT has been increasingly sued in the area of health and disability. The current study examined the social representations of "tinnitus" and "health" among individuals with tinnitus who are seeking online psychological interventions. (2) Materials/Method: The data were gathered using a free association task about their "tinnitus" and "health" from 399 individuals with tinnitus. The data were analyzed using both qualitative and quantitative analyses methods. (3) Results: The responses resulted in 39 and 30 categories respectively, for "tinnitus" and "health". The most commonly occurring categories for tinnitus included: descriptions of tinnitus (18%), annoying (13.5%), persistent (8%), and distracting (5%). The most commonly occurring categories for health included: content (12%), conditions (8%), active (7%), take control (6%), and overweight (5%). The responses to tinnitus had predominantly negative connotations (i.e., 76.9%) whereas a larger proportion of responses toward their health was related to positive connotations (i.e., 46.4%). These frequently occurring items were also dominant in similarities analysis. Prototypical analysis of tinnitus responses identified categories horrible and bothersome to be key items in the central zone. The categories in central zone of health responses included: content, active, healthy, grateful, and overweight. (4) Conclusions: Individuals with tinnitus have very negative view of their tinnitus impacting their psychological status. Tinnitus management should focus on reducing the negative associations toward their tinnitus and strengthen the positive aspects related to their general health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
attitude, free association, health, social representations, tinnitus
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-193637 (URN)10.3390/audiolres13020020 (DOI)000977438900001 ()36960981 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85153703229 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: National Institute on Deafness and Communication Disorders (NIDCD) of the National Institute of Health (NIH) [R21DC017214]

Available from: 2023-05-10 Created: 2023-05-10 Last updated: 2023-09-15Bibliographically approved
Cawthorne, T., Käll, A., Bennett, S., Baker, E., Andersson, G. & Shafran, R. (2023). The development and preliminary evaluation of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for Chronic Loneliness in Young People.. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 51(5), 414-431, Article ID PII S1352465823000231.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The development and preliminary evaluation of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for Chronic Loneliness in Young People.
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2023 (English)In: Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, ISSN 1352-4658, E-ISSN 1469-1833, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 414-431, article id PII S1352465823000231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Approximately 10% of young people 'often' feel lonely, with loneliness being predictive of multiple physical and mental health problems. Research has found CBT to be effective for reducing loneliness in adults, but interventions for young people who report loneliness as their primary difficulty are lacking.

METHOD: CBT for Chronic Loneliness in Young People was developed as a modular intervention. This was evaluated in a single-case experimental design (SCED) with seven participants aged 11-18 years. The primary outcome was self-reported loneliness on the Three-Item Loneliness Scale. Secondary outcomes were self-reported loneliness on the UCLA-LS-3, and self- and parent-reported RCADS and SDQ impact scores. Feasibility and participant satisfaction were also assessed.

RESULTS: At post-intervention, there was a 66.41% reduction in loneliness, with all seven participants reporting a significant reduction on the primary outcome measure (p < .001). There was also a reduction on the UCLA-LS-3 of a large effect (d = 1.53). Reductions of a large effect size were also found for parent-reported total RCADS (d = 2.19) and SDQ impact scores (d = 2.15) and self-reported total RCADS scores (d = 1.81), with a small reduction in self-reported SDQ impact scores (d = 0.41). Participants reported high levels of satisfaction, with the protocol being feasible and acceptable.

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that CBT for Chronic Loneliness in Young People may be an effective intervention for reducing loneliness and co-occurring mental health difficulties in young people. The intervention should now be evaluated further through a randomised controlled trial (RCT).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2023
Keywords
CBT, Child mental health, Loneliness
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-196576 (URN)10.1017/S1352465823000231 (DOI)001146780400005 ()37550307 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2024-02-23
Maj, A., Michalak, N., Graczykowska, A. & Andersson, G. (2023). The effect of internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and anxiety on quality of life: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.. Internet interventions, 33, Article ID 100654.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for depression and anxiety on quality of life: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.
2023 (English)In: Internet interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 33, article id 100654Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although numerous studies have examined the effects of internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for depression and anxiety on quality of life, no meta-analysis has yet been conducted to integrate the results of these studies. We conducted systematic searches in PubMed, Cochrane, and PsycInfo, which included terms for treatment type, modality of delivery, condition, and main outcome. We included studies that met the following inclusion criteria: (a) randomized controlled trials, (b) patients allocated to some form of the control condition, (c) patients receiving some type of treatment of anxiety and/or depression involving Internet-delivered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, (d) use of a validated outcome measure assessing the level of quality of life, (e) conducted with adult participants diagnosed with anxiety disorder and/or unipolar depression, (f) papers written in English. We analyzed 40 randomized controlled trials with a total of 4289 participants that met inclusion criteria. The pooled between-group effect size for the quality of life overall score was small (g = 0.35, 95 % CI: 0.26-0.44, p = .0001), favoring iCBT over the control conditions. Regarding the distinct quality of life domains measured by the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment, a statistically significant difference between iCBT and control conditions was found only for the physical health domain (g = 0.56, 95 % CI: 0.06-1.07, p = .029), in favor of iCBT. In both cases, heterogeneity was moderate. While the effect on the quality of life is small (the overall quality of life score) to moderate (the physical health domain score), we conclude that iCBT for depression and anxiety may be a promising approach for improving the quality of life of patients.

Keywords
Internet, Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy, Quality of life, iCBT, meta-analysis
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-196575 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2023.100654 (DOI)001055795500001 ()37555075 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Ministry of Science and Higher Education subsidies for maintaining and developing the didactic and research po-tential of the Institute of Psychology of the SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities;  [SUB/IPsy/2019/22]

Available from: 2023-08-14 Created: 2023-08-14 Last updated: 2023-12-11
Store, S. J., Tillfors, M., Wästlund, E., Angelhoff, C., Andersson, G. & Norell-Clarke, A. (2023). The effects of a sleep robot intervention on sleep, depression and anxiety in adults with insomnia - A randomized waitlist-controlled trial. Journal of Sleep Research, 32(3), Article ID e13758.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of a sleep robot intervention on sleep, depression and anxiety in adults with insomnia - A randomized waitlist-controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 32, no 3, article id e13758Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study objective was to assess if a 3-week intervention with the Somnox sleep robot had effects on symptoms of insomnia, somatic arousal, and/or concurrent symptoms of depression and anxiety in adults with insomnia, compared with a waitlist-control group. The participants (n = 44) were randomized to a 3-week intervention with the sleep robot (n = 22), or to a waitlist-control group (n = 22). The primary outcome measure was the Insomnia Severity Index administered at baseline, mid-intervention, post-intervention and at 1-month follow-up. Secondary outcome measures were the Pre-Sleep Arousal Scale, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Additionally, sleep-onset latency, wake time after sleep onset, total sleep time and sleep efficiency were measured the week prior to and the last week of the intervention, both subjectively with the Consensus Sleep Diary and objectively with wrist actigraphy. Mixed-effects models were used to analyse data. The effect of the sleep robot on the participants insomnia severity was not statistically significant. The differences between the intervention group and the control group on the measures of arousal, anxiety and depression were also not statistically significant, and neither were the sleep diary and actigraphy variables. In conclusion, a 3-week intervention with daily at-home use of the robot was not found to be an effective method to relieve the symptom burden in adults with insomnia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2023
Keywords
arousal; hyperarousal; robot; sleep
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-189766 (URN)10.1111/jsr.13758 (DOI)000871837800001 ()36285420 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Region Varmland through DigitalWellResearch project [HNT 2017/279]

Available from: 2022-11-08 Created: 2022-11-08 Last updated: 2023-12-05Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4753-6745

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