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Mendes-Santos, C., Weiderpass, E., Santana, R. & Andersson, G. (2019). A guided internet-delivered individually-tailored ACT-influenced cognitive behavioural intervention to improve psychosocial outcomes in breast cancer survivors (iNNOVBC): Study protocol. Internet Interventions, 17, Article ID 100236.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A guided internet-delivered individually-tailored ACT-influenced cognitive behavioural intervention to improve psychosocial outcomes in breast cancer survivors (iNNOVBC): Study protocol
2019 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Internet interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 17, article id 100236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Internet-delivered interventions can provide remarkable opportunities in addressing breast cancer survivors' unmet support care needs, as they present an effective strategy to improve care coordination and provide access to efficacious, cost-efficient and convenient survivorship care. Nevertheless, research focusing on improving survivors' psychosocial needs using internet-based tools is scarce and its practical implementation is limited.

Objectives: To study the acceptability, feasibility, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of iNNOVBC, a 10 weeks guided internet-delivered individually-tailored Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)-influenced cognitive behavioural (CBT) intervention developed to improve mild to moderate anxiety and depression in Breast cancer survivors when compared to treatment as usual (TAU) in a waiting list control group (WLC).

Methods: A two-arm, parallel, open label, multicentre, waiting list randomized controlled trial will be conducted to investigate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of INNOVBC. The primary outcomes in this research will be anxiety and depression. Secondary outcomes will include psychological flexibility, fatigue, insomnia, sexual dysfunction and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL).

Ethical approval: This study has been reviewed and approved by Comissão Nacional de Proteção de Dados; Instituto Português de Oncologia do Porto Francisco Gentil; Unidade Local de Saúde de Matosinhos, EPE; Centro Hospitalar de São João and Ordem dos Psicólogos ethical committees.

Expected results: It is anticipated that iNNOVBC will show to be an efficacious and cost-effective program in improving the outcomes of interest in this study, as opposed to a WLC under TAU. The results of this research will be published in accordance with CONSORT-EHEALTH guidelines.

Conclusions: This study will inform on the acceptability, feasibility, efficacy and cost-effectiveness of iNNOVBC, in improving psychosocial outcomes in breast cancer survivors when compared to TAU in a WLC. Its conclusions will contribute to understand the idiosyncrasies of designing and implementing internet-delivered interventions in breast cancer survivors.Trial Registration code: INNOVBC (NCT03275727).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), Breast cancer survivors, Internet psychosocial intervention, Portugal, EU, Randomized controlled trial protocol
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160297 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2019.01.004 (DOI)000485180400001 ()30949435 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85063066338 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Erasmus + Programme of the European Union

Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Kothari, R., Barker, C., Pistrang, N., Rozental, A., Egan, S., Wade, T., . . . Shafran, R. (2019). A randomised controlled trial of guided internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism: Effects on psychopathology and transdiagnostic processes. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 64, 113-122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomised controlled trial of guided internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism: Effects on psychopathology and transdiagnostic processes
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, ISSN 0005-7916, E-ISSN 1873-7943, Vol. 64, p. 113-122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and objectives

Perfectionism is a transdiagnostic process that has been associated with a range of psychopathology and also with other transdiagnostic processes. We have previously shown that guided internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) can reduce symptoms of dysfunctional perfectionism, however, no impact was observed on symptoms of depression and anxiety. Here we explore the impact of guided ICBT for perfectionism on symptoms of other associated psychopathology, specifically obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and eating disorders, and also on other associated transdiagnostic processes (self-esteem, intolerance of uncertainty, and self-compassion).

Methods

Participants who presented with clinical levels of perfectionism were randomised to an experimental group that received the intervention (n = 62), or a wait list control group (n = 58). Questionnaires assessing symptoms of OCD, eating disorders, self-esteem, intolerance of uncertainty, and fear of self-compassion were completed pre-intervention, post-intervention (12 weeks), and at follow-up (24 weeks). Between group effect sizes are reported.

Results

The intervention led to significant decreases in symptoms of OCD (d = −0.9; CI: -1.4, −0.4) and eating disorders (d = −0.6; CI: -1.0, −0.1), and had an impact on other transdiagnostic processes resulting in increased self-esteem (d = 0.7; CI: 0.2, 1.2), decreases in intolerance of uncertainty (d = −0.9; CI: -1.4, −0.4), and fear of self-compassion (d = −0.8; CI: -1.3, −0.3). At follow-up changes were maintained in symptoms of OCD (d = −1.3; CI: -1.8, −0.8), disordered eating (d = −0.7; CI: -1.2, −0.2), intolerance of uncertainty (d = −0.8; CI: -1.2, −0.3), and fear of self-compassion (d = −1.0; CI: -1.5, −0.5).

Conclusions

Guided ICBT for perfectionism improves associated psychopathology and transdiagnostic processes. ClinicalTrials.gov registration no. NCT02756871.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pergamon Press, 2019
Keywords
Perfectionism; Cognitive behavioural therapy; Online intervention; Guided self-help; Transdiagnostic; Randomised controlled trial; Self-esteem; Intolerance of uncertainty; Self-compassion; Obsessive-compulsive disorder; Eating disorder
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158037 (URN)10.1016/j.jbtep.2019.03.007 (DOI)000469161400016 ()30981162 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064075585 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-06-25 Created: 2019-06-25 Last updated: 2019-08-07Bibliographically approved
Miloff, A., Lindner, P., Dafgard, P., Deak, S., Garke, M., Hamilton, W., . . . Carlbring, P. (2019). Automated virtual reality exposure therapy for spider phobia vs. in-vivo one-session treatment: A randomized non-inferiority trial. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 118, 130-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automated virtual reality exposure therapy for spider phobia vs. in-vivo one-session treatment: A randomized non-inferiority trial
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2019 (English)In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, ISSN 0005-7967, E-ISSN 1873-622X, Vol. 118, p. 130-140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective This study compared the efficacy of a technician-assisted single-session virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET) for the treatment of spider phobia featuring low-cost consumer-available hardware and novel automated software to gold-standard in-vivo one-session treatment (OST), using a parallel group randomized non-inferiority design.

Method Participants (N = 100) were randomized to VRET and OST arms. Assessors blinded to treatment allocation evaluated participants at pre- and post-treatment as well follow-up (3 and 12 months) using a behavioral approach test (BAT) and self-rated fear of spider, anxiety, depression and quality-of-life scales. A maximum post-treatment difference of 2-points on the BAT qualified as non-inferiority margin.

Results Linear mixed models noted large, significant reductions in behavioral avoidance and self-reported fear in both groups at post-treatment, with VRET approaching the strong treatment benefits of OST over time. Non-inferiority was identified at 3- and 12- months follow-up but was significantly worse until 12-months. There was no significant difference on a questionnaire measuring negative effects.

Conclusions Automated VRET efficaciously reduced spider phobia symptoms in the short-term and was non-inferior to in-vivo exposure therapy in the long-term. VRET effectiveness trials are warranted to evaluate real-world benefits and non-specific therapeutic factors accruing from the presence of a technician during treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Exposure therapy; One-session treatment; Virtual reality; Spider phobia
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158843 (URN)10.1016/j.brat.2019.04.004 (DOI)000471738600014 ()31075675 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065126648 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Government innovation agency Vinnova

Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Johansson, O., Bjärehed, J., Andersson, G., Carlbring, P. & Lundh, L.-G. (2019). Effectiveness of guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for depression in routine psychiatry: A randomized controlled trial. Internet Interventions, 17, Article ID 100247.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness of guided internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for depression in routine psychiatry: A randomized controlled trial
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2019 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Internet interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 17, article id 100247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depression is one of the most common health problems worldwide but is often undertreated. Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) appears to be an effective treatment option, with the potential to reach a larger proportion of individuals suffering from depression. While many studies have examined the efficacy of ICBT for depression in randomized controlled trials, fewer have focused on the effectiveness of ICBT when used as an integral part of routine health care. In this study the effectiveness of an 8-week ICBT program was examined when delivered in a routine psychiatric setting. A total of 108 patients were referred and 54 were then included and randomized to either ICBT or a waitlist control condition. The sample had a lower education level and a higher proportion of individuals were on sick leave than comparable previous efficacy trials of ICBT for depression conducted in Sweden. Measures assessing depression, anxiety and psychiatric symptoms were administered before and after treatment, follow up was performed at 6- and 12 months after treatment had ended. ICBT resulted in significant reductions of depressive symptoms in the treatment group when compared to a waitlist control group with a large effect size (Cohen's d = 1.6). Treatment gains were maintained at 6- and 12 months after the treatment had ended. In terms of clinical significance, 58% of the sample had improved or recovered after treatment. The study was small, and patients received general psychiatric care after the ICBT treatment had ended which limits the implications. We conclude that ICBT appears to be an effective treatment for depression when delivered as an integral part of routine psychiatric care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Cognitive behavioral therapy, Depression, Guided internet-based treatment, Psychiatry
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160291 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2019.100247 (DOI)000485180400012 ()31249791 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85067245577 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Psykiatrifonden; Lindhaga Foundation

Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Holmqvist Larsson, K., Andersson, G., Stern, H. & Zetterqvist, M. (2019). Emotion regulation group skills training for adolescents and parents: A pilot study of an add-on treatment in a clinical setting. Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Article ID UNSP 1359104519869782.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Emotion regulation group skills training for adolescents and parents: A pilot study of an add-on treatment in a clinical setting
2019 (English)In: Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, ISSN 1359-1045, E-ISSN 1461-7021, article id UNSP 1359104519869782Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Difficulties with emotion regulation have been identified as an underlying mechanism in mental health. This pilot study aimed at examining whether group skills training in emotion regulation for adolescents and parents as an add-on intervention was feasible in an outpatient child and adolescent psychiatric clinic. We also investigated if the treatment increased knowledge and awareness of emotions and their functions, increased emotion regulation skills and decreased self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression. Six skills training groups were piloted with a total of 20 adolescents and 21 adults. The treatment consisted of five sessions dealing with psychoeducation about emotions and emotion regulation skills training. Paired-samples t test was used to compare differences between before-and-after measures for adolescents and parents separately. The primary outcome measure, Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale, showed significant improvement after treatment for both adolescents and parents. For adolescents, measures of alexithymia were significantly reduced. Also, emotional awareness was significantly increased. Measures of depression and anxiety did not change. In conclusion, group skills training as an add-on treatment can be feasible and effective but further studies are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Emotion regulation; skills training; adolescents; treatment; group
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160430 (URN)10.1177/1359104519869782 (DOI)000483213500001 ()31419914 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85071517722 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-23 Created: 2019-09-23 Last updated: 2019-10-01Bibliographically approved
Titov, N., Hadjistavropoulos, H. D., Nielssen, O., Mohr, D. C., Andersson, G. & Dear, B. F. (2019). From Research to Practice: Ten Lessons in Delivering Digital Mental Health Services. JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, 8(8), Article ID 1239.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Research to Practice: Ten Lessons in Delivering Digital Mental Health Services
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2019 (English)In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 8, article id 1239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a large body of research showing that psychological treatment can be effectively delivered via the internet, and Digital Mental Health Services (DMHS) are now delivering those interventions in routine care. However, not all attempts to translate these research outcomes into routine care have been successful. This paper draws on the experience of successful DMHS in Australia and Canada to describe ten lessons learned while establishing and delivering internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) and other mental health services as part of routine care. These lessons include learnings at four levels of analysis, including lessons learned working with (1) consumers, (2) therapists, (3) when operating DMHS, and (4) working within healthcare systems. Key themes include recognising that DMHS should provide not only treatment but also information and assessment services, that DMHS require robust systems for training and supervising therapists, that specialist skills are required to operate DMHS, and that the outcome data from DMHS can inform future mental health policy. We also confirm that operating such clinics is particularly challenging in the evolving funding, policy, and regulatory context, as well as increasing expectations from consumers about DMHS. Notwithstanding the difficulties of delivering DMHS, we conclude that the benefits of such services for the broader community significantly outweigh the challenges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
delivery; implementation; internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy; psychological treatment; routine care; depression; anxiety disorders
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160435 (URN)10.3390/jcm8081239 (DOI)000483737700124 ()31426460 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Saskatchewan Ministry of Health; Canadian Institutes of Health Research [152917]; Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation; Saskatchewan Centre for Patient-Oriented Research; Australian Department of Health; MQ Health, Macquarie University

Available from: 2019-09-20 Created: 2019-09-20 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Andersson, G., Carlbring, P., Titov, N. & Lindefors, N. (2019). Internet Interventions for Adults with Anxiety and Mood Disorders: A Narrative Umbrella Review of Recent Meta-Analyses. Canadian journal of psychiatry, 64(7), 465-470
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet Interventions for Adults with Anxiety and Mood Disorders: A Narrative Umbrella Review of Recent Meta-Analyses
2019 (English)In: Canadian journal of psychiatry, ISSN 0706-7437, Vol. 64, no 7, p. 465-470Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) has existed for 20 years and there are now several controlled trials for a range of problems. In this paper, we focused on recent meta-analytic reviews of the literature and found moderate to large effects reported for panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and major depression. In total, we reviewed 9 recent meta-analytic reviews out of a total of 618 meta-analytic reviews identified using our search terms. In these selected reviews, 166 studies were included, including overlap in reviews on similar conditions. We also covered a recent review on transdiagnostic treatments and 2 reviews on face-to-face v. internet treatment. The growing number of meta-analytic reviews of studies now suggests that ICBT works and can be as effective as face-to-face therapy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
internet delivery; cognitive behaviour therapy; long-term effects; depression; anxiety
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159064 (URN)10.1177/0706743719839381 (DOI)000473937200003 ()31096757 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066863296 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Linkoping University

Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Wade, T. D., Kay, E., de Valle, M. K., Egan, S. J., Andersson, G., Carlbring, P. & Shafran, R. (2019). Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism: More is better but no need to be prescriptive. Clinical Psychologist
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for perfectionism: More is better but no need to be prescriptive
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2019 (English)In: Clinical Psychologist, ISSN 1328-4207, E-ISSN 1742-9552Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background

The current study explored whether higher‐ (up to 8 modules) versus lower‐dose (3 or less modules) unguided internet Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for perfectionism (ICBT‐P) was more effective, and the best method to promote higher dosage.

Methods

Two sequential randomised ICBT‐P studies were conducted with participants who self‐identified as having difficulties with perfectionism; in the first participants (N = 51) received 3‐module ICBT‐P or wait‐list, and in the second participants (N = 55) received fixed (asked to complete all 8 modules two per week over 4‐weeks) or flexible format (after completing the first psychoeducational module, participants decided how many/in what order they completed the modules). We examined impact on our primary variables, perfectionistic concerns and standards, and secondary outcomes of negative affect, body image flexibility, and self‐efficacy.

Results

More modules were completed in the higher‐ (M modules = 4.36, SD = 3.29) versus lower‐dose (M = 1.96, SD = 1.23) ICBT‐P, d = 0.86 (95% confidence interval: 0.39, 1.34). The latter impacted perfectionism but not secondary outcomes; the former impacted all outcomes (except for self‐efficacy), and within‐group effect size improvements were double in the high‐ compared to low‐dose ICBT‐P. There was no difference between the fixed and flexible formats in terms of the number of modules completed or impact.

Conclusions

We can offer a patient‐centred approach to ICBT‐P that is effective, while suggesting completion of more modules can result in larger, more pervasive improvements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
body image flexibility; fixed or flexible format; internet cognitive-behavioural therapy; negative affect; perfectionism
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159054 (URN)10.1111/cp.12193 (DOI)000474411100001 ()2-s2.0-85068657142 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-07-22 Created: 2019-07-22 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Beukes, E. W., Manchaiah, V., Allen, P. M., Baguley, D. M. & Andersson, G. (2019). Internet-Based Interventions for Adults With Hearing Loss, Tinnitus, and Vestibular Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. TRENDS IN HEARING, 23, Article ID 2331216519851749.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-Based Interventions for Adults With Hearing Loss, Tinnitus, and Vestibular Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
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2019 (English)In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 23, article id 2331216519851749Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Internet-based interventions have been developed to improve access to audiovestibular health care. This review aimed to identify outcomes of Internet interventions for adults with hearing loss, tinnitus, and vestibular disorders. Electronic databases and manual searches were performed to identify studies meeting eligibility for inclusion. Fifteen studies (1,811 participants) met the inclusion criteria, with nine studies targeting tinnitus distress, five considering hearing loss, and one for vestibular difficulties. Only the tinnitus and hearing loss Internet intervention studies were eligible for data synthesis. Internet-based interventions for hearing loss were diverse. Overall, they showed no significant effects, although a statistically significant moderate effect (d = 0.59) was found after removing the study with the highest risk of bias (as a result of high attrition). Most Internet-based interventions for tinnitus provided cognitive behavioural therapy. They yielded statistically significant mean effect sizes for reducing tinnitus distress compared with both inactive (d = 0.59) and active controls (d = 0.32). Significant effects were also present for the secondary outcomes of anxiety, depression, insomnia, and quality of life (combined effect d = 0.28). Only Internet-based interventions for tinnitus evaluated the 1-year postintervention effects indicated that results were maintained long term (d = 0.45). Scientific study quality was appraised using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation approach and found to vary from very low to moderate. This review indicates the potential of Internet interventions for tinnitus to provide evidence-based accessible care. There is a need for additional high-quality evidence before conclusive results can be established regarding the effects of audiovestibular Internet interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
Internet interventions; hearing loss; tinnitus; vestibular disorders; systematic review
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-159284 (URN)10.1177/2331216519851749 (DOI)000476759000001 ()31328660 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85069792941 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Johnson, S., Egan, S. J., Andersson, G., Carlbring, P., Shafran, R. & Wade, T. D. (2019). Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism: Targeting dysmorphic concern. Body image, 30, 44-55, Article ID S1740-1445(18)30489-3.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism: Targeting dysmorphic concern
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2019 (English)In: Body image, ISSN 1740-1445, E-ISSN 1873-6807, Vol. 30, p. 44-55, article id S1740-1445(18)30489-3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Perfectionism is an important transdiagnostic risk factor for several psychopathologies. As such, treatments targeting perfectionism have gained increased attention over recent years. While perfectionism is postulated to be an important underlying mechanism for dysmorphic concern, no research has explored the benefits of targeting perfectionism to reduce dysmorphic concern. The current study evaluated the use of Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism (ICBT-P) with 31 participants (28 women) with high levels of dysmorphic concern to examine the impact on perfectionism, dysmorphic concern, body image disturbance, negative affect, and selective attention towards appearance-based stimuli. Using a case series design, observations were collected at baseline, at the end of a 4-week pre-treatment phase, after the 8-week ICBT-P, and 1-month post-treatment. Intent-to-treat analyses showed significant improvement from baseline to end-of-treatment and follow-up on most of the variables, with a large effect size decrease in dysmorphic concern, and decreased selective attention to BDD-body, BDD-positive, and BDD-negative words. The results of this study support the use of ICBT-P as an efficacious treatment worthy of further examination in populations who experience high levels of dysmorphic concern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Cognitive-behavioral therapy, Dysmorphic concern, Internet, Perfectionism, Selective attention
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160294 (URN)10.1016/j.bodyim.2019.05.002 (DOI)000484881300005 ()31128427 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065852707 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-17 Created: 2019-09-17 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4753-6745

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