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Håkan, H., Johansson, B., Magnusson, L., Lyxell, B. & Ellis, R. J. (2017). Speech Recognition and Cognitive Skills in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 60(9), 2752-2763
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Speech Recognition and Cognitive Skills in Bimodal Cochlear Implant Users
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 2752-2763Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To examine the relation between speech recognition and cognitive skills in bimodal cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid users.

Method: Seventeen bimodal CI users (28-74 years) were recruited to the study. Speech recognition tests were carried out in quiet and in noise. The cognitive tests employed included the Reading Span Test and the Trail Making Test (Daneman & Carpenter, 1980; Reitan, 1958, 1992), measuring working memory capacity and processing speed and executive functioning, respectively. Data were analyzed using paired-sample t tests, Pearson correlations, and partial correlations controlling for age.

Results: The results indicate that performance on some cognitive tests predicts speech recognition and that bimodal listening generates a significant improvement in speech in quiet compared to unilateral CI listening. However, the current results also suggest that bimodal listening requires different cognitive skills than does unimodal CI listening. This is likely to relate to the relative difficulty of having to integrate 2 different signals and then map the integrated signal to representations stored in the long-term memory.

Conclusions: Even though participants obtained speech recognition benefit from bimodal listening, the results suggest that processing bimodal stimuli involves different cognitive skills than does unimodal conditions in quiet. Thus, clinically, it is important to consider this when assessing treatment outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2017
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140999 (URN)10.1044/2017_JSLHR-H-16-0276 (DOI)000411478200028 ()28885638 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-09-19 Created: 2017-09-19 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved
Ronnasen, B., Moller, K., Moller, C., Lyxell, B. & Anderzen-Carlsson, A. (2016). Aspects of learning from the perspective of people with Alstrom syndrome. Disability and Rehabilitation, 38(7), 644-652
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aspects of learning from the perspective of people with Alstrom syndrome
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2016 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 644-652Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the study was to explore aspects of learning, from a lifelong perspective, in individuals with Alstrom syndrome (AS). AS is an autosomal recessive disorder causing early blindness, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, cardiomyopathy, endocrine disorders, metabolic dysfunction, and abbreviated lifespan. Method: Eleven individuals with AS participated. The study had a qualitative explorative design, giving voice to the participants perspectives on their situation. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, which were subjected to conventional (inductive) qualitative content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed in the participants a quest for independence and an image of themselves as capable people willing to learn, but in constant need of support to continue learning throughout their lives to be as independent as possible. Conclusion: Based on the levels of functioning, i.e. personal resources, revealed in the interviews, supervisors, caregivers, and teachers are encouraged to allow people with AS to be their own advocates, as they know best how, what, and with whom they learn, and what type of sensory material - tactile, auditory, visual, or a combination - is most helpful.Implications for RehabilitationIndividuals with AS strive for independence, and to be independent they need to continue to learn throughout their lives.Individuals with AS know best how they learn, and should be asked what modalities are the most effective for them.The tactile modality for learning will continue throughout life and should be emphasized early in the individuals education and rehabilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2016
Keyword
Alstrom syndrome (AS); deafblindness; dual sensory loss; learning; sensoneural progressive hearing loss; vision loss
National Category
Learning Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124616 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2015.1055381 (DOI)000367902500005 ()26084572 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council; Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linnaeus Centre HEAD

Available from: 2016-02-09 Created: 2016-02-08 Last updated: 2016-02-16
Ellis, R., Molander, P., Rönnberg, J., Lyxell, B., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2016). Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study. Ear and Hearing, 37(1), 73-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study
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2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of an internet-based version of the trail making test (TMT) to predict performance on a speech-in-noise perception task.

Design: Data were taken from a sample of 1509 listeners aged between 18 and 91 years old. Participants completed computerized versions of the TMT and an adaptive speech-in-noise recognition test. All testing was conducted via the internet.

Results: The results indicate that better performance on both the simple and complex subtests of the TMT are associated with better speech-in-noise recognition scores. Thirty-eight percent of the participants had scores on the speech-in-noise test that indicated the presence of a hearing loss.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that the TMT may be a useful tool in the assessment, and possibly the treatment, of speech-recognition difficulties. The results indicate that the relation between speech-in-noise recognition and TMT performance relates both to the capacity of the TMT to index processing speed and to the more complex cognitive abilities also implicated in TMT performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
Keyword
Cognition, Internet screening, Speech-in-noise perception, Trail making test
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123218 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000218 (DOI)000367343400008 ()26317162 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (Forte) [2009-0055]

Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2017-05-03
Henricson, C., Frölander, H. E., Möller, C. & Lyxell, B. (2016). Theory-of-mind and cognitive function in adults with Usher and Alström syndromes. Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, 110(5), 349-366
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Theory-of-mind and cognitive function in adults with Usher and Alström syndromes
2016 (English)In: Journal of Visual Impairment & Blindness, ISSN 0145-482X, E-ISSN 1559-1476, Vol. 110, no 5, p. 349-366Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Theory-of-Mind (ToM) refers to the ability to impute mental states to one self and to others. ToM was investigated in adults with Usher syndrome type II (USH2) and Alström syndrome (AS) - two syndromes causing acquired deafblindness. The syndromes differ with regard to onset and degree of sensory loss. Individuals with AS in contrast to individuals with USH2 display a high incidence of additional physical diseases. Cognitive shortcomings are generally not observed in USH2 or in AS, but cognitive delay and a delay in receptive language have been reported in AS. The results were compared to adults with normal hearing and vision (NHV).

Methods: Thirteen persons with USH2, 12 persons with AS, and 33 persons with NHV participated. All participants performed a test of working memory capacity and verbal ability. ToM was tested with Happe´s Strange Stories test, taxing the ability to understand the emotions and actions of story characters, comprising a mental condition. The test also include a section of matched stories, tapping verbal problem solving ability in a physical condition, and a set of tasks tapping the ability to recall verbal material.

Results: There were no differences between the three groups in the ability to recall verbal material. Significant differences were however established on working memory, and on verbal problem solving in a physical condition, with higher results for the NHV group. The two groups with deafblindness also displayed poorer ToM performance than the NHV group, by producing fewer correct mental references. The two groups with deafblindness differed from each other also in the ability to produce mental inferences as such, where the USH group outperformed the AS group. Intra-group variability in this ability was also observed within the two syndromal groups. Differences were related to verbal ability, complex working memory capacity, visual status, and to a minor extent auditory capacity. The prevalence and severity of additional physical diseases in AS was not related to ToM performance.

Conclusions: A limited access to information as a function of sensory loss could influence degree of experience of the physical world, but also of social situations and of communication, affecting ToM development negatively. Early loss of visual field and visual acuity was related to ToM performance in individuals with USH2 and AS. Access to information also requires processing skills promoted by effective cognitive skills. Working memory capacity was related to ToM in USH. This relation also points to the contribution of hearing in development of ToM. Differences between the two groups could be a function of genetic conditions, where the gene causing USH2 only affects the ear and the eye, while AS in addition has a multi-systemic pathology with varying onset and degree. Differences in ToM performance in the AS group could however not be directly attributed to health conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER FOUNDATION BLIND, 2016
Keyword
Usher syndrome (USH); Alström syndrome (AS); Theory-of-Mind; Deafblindness; physical disorders
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120113 (URN)000384900000006 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Linnaeus Centre HEAD

Available from: 2015-07-09 Created: 2015-07-09 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2015). Cognitive inhibition, WMC, and speech-recognition-in-noise. In: 3rd International conference in Cognitive Hearing Science and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015.: . Paper presented at Cognitive Hearing SCience and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive inhibition, WMC, and speech-recognition-in-noise
2015 (English)In: 3rd International conference in Cognitive Hearing Science and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015., 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive abilities are important for a number of human attributes, such as making sense of communication, holding information active in memory, and making decisions. When it is the goal to focus on a single target voice, and resist intrusions from irrelevant information, cognitive inhibition can aid us in our endeavour. Cognitive inhibition is thought to support and co-operate with working memory. Abilities such as cognitive inhibition and working memory are also important for speech processing, even more so when listening to speech under adverse conditions. In order to assess different difficulties that can arise in every day listening situations, it´s of importance to have solid methods for measuring cognitive abilities. In the present study we present a task assessing cognitive inhibition, and how it relates to individual working memory capacity (WMC), and speech-recognition-in-noise. Forty-six young normally-hearing individuals were presented with a cognitive test battery, as well as a speech-in-noise test. Our results suggest that individuals with high WMC, also exhibit good cognitive inhibition. The results also indicate that those who perform well in the cognitive inhibition task need less favourable signal-to-noise-ratios in the speech-recognition task. Our findings indicate that capacity to resist semantic interference can be used to predict performance in speech-recognition tasks when listening under adverse conditions. 

Keyword
speech in noise, working memory, inhibition, normal hearing, working memory capacity
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126356 (URN)
Conference
Cognitive Hearing SCience and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 8723111202
Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2016-04-11Bibliographically approved
Henricson, C., Lidestam, B., Lyxell, B. & Moller, C. (2015). Cognitive skills and reading in adults with Usher syndrome type 2. Frontiers in Psychology, 6(326)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive skills and reading in adults with Usher syndrome type 2
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, no 326Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate working memory (WM), phonological skills, lexical skills, and reading comprehension in adults with Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2). Design: The participants performed tests of phonological processing, lexical access, WM, and reading comprehension. The design of the test situation and tests was specifically considered for use with persons with low vision in combination with hearing impairment. The performance of the group with USH2 on the different cognitive measures was compared to that of a matched control group with normal hearing and vision (NVH). Study Sample: Thirteen participants with USH2 aged 21-60 years and a control group of 10 individuals with NVH, matched on age and level of education. Results: The group with USH2 displayed significantly lower performance on tests of phonological processing, and on measures requiring both fast visual judgment and phonological processing. There was a larger variation in performance among the individuals with USH2 than in the matched control group. Conclusion: The performance of the group with USH2 indicated similar problems with phonological processing skills and phonological WM as in individuals with long-term hearing loss. The group with USH2 also had significantly longer reaction times, indicating that processing of visual stimuli is difficult due to the visual impairment. These findings point toward the difficulties in accessing information that persons with USH2 experience, and could be part of the explanation of why individuals with USH2 report high levels of fatigue and feelings of stress (Wahlqvist et al., 2013).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers, 2015
Keyword
deafblindness; Usher syndrome; phonological skill; lexical skill; working memory; reading
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117380 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00326 (DOI)000351714000001 ()25859232 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council Forte; Audiological Research Centre in Orebro

Available from: 2015-04-24 Created: 2015-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Dahlström, Ö., Skagerstrand, Å., Lyxell, B., Thunberg, P., Sörqvist, P., Lundin, M., . . . Möller, C. (2015). Cognitive training and effects on speech-in noise performance in normal hearing and hearing impaired individuals. In: : . Paper presented at Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive training and effects on speech-in noise performance in normal hearing and hearing impaired individuals
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive training might have potential to improve speech understanding under adverse listening conditions. Here, we have examined the effects of a 5-week computer-based cognitive training program on speech-in-noise-performance, in normal hearing (NH) participants and in participants with mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss (HI).

Two groups, matched on gender and age (45-65 years), of 20 participants each (HI and NH respectively) are recruited. Participants perform four test-sessions; inclusion (t0), five weeks (t1), ten weeks (t2) and six months (t3). Training is performed either between t0 and t1, or between t1 and t2 (using a cross-over design), using the computer-based Cogmed training program, approximately 30-40 minutes per day, five days per week, during five weeks. At each session participants are tested in three different ways: (a) cognitive testing (KIPS, SICSPAN, TRT); (b) auditory performance (pure tone-audiometry (air- and bone-conduction) and speech audiometry (HINT, Swedish SPIN-test (SNR +4dB))); (c) cortical activation (MR sessions where participants performed a speech-in-noise task using Hagerman-sentences with steady-state speech-spectrum noise (SSN) and with two competing talkers). MR imaging is performed on a Philips Achieva 1.5 Tesla scanner using a sparse imaging technique in which stimuli are presented during the silent period between successive scans. Participants listen to auditory stimuli under eight different conditions: clear speech, SSN or two competing talkers (each at 90%, 50% and 0% intelligibility), and silent rest. Pre- and post-training, hearing disability is assessed by the Speech-Spatial-Qualities-Questionnaire.

The study is on-going and behavioral results as well as results from fMRI will be presented.

National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123247 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication (CHCCOM2015), Linköping, June 14-17, 2015
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2018-04-07
Hua, H., Anderzen-Carlsson, A., Widen, S., Moller, C. & Lyxell, B. (2015). Conceptions of working life among employees with mild-moderate aided hearing impairment: A phenomenographic study. International Journal of Audiology, 54(11), 873-880
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conceptions of working life among employees with mild-moderate aided hearing impairment: A phenomenographic study
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 11, p. 873-880Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim was to explore the conceptions of working life among employees with mild-moderate aided hearing impairment (HI). Design: This study has a descriptive design, in which data was collected by means of semi-structured interviews. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The text was analysed in accordance with the phenomenographic approach. Study sample: Fifteen participants with mild-moderate aided HI were recruited to the current study. Results: The analysis of the interviews resulted in four main categories describing the participants conceptions of working life: (1) diffiiculties in daily work, (2) communication strategies, (3) facilitating factors in work environment, and (4) impact on daily life. The four identified descriptive categories show that the effects of HI on the lives of working adults generate far-reaching psychosocial consequences for the individual. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that difficulties and impact of having a HI interact with strategies used by the individual and contextual facilitators made in the work environment. We argue that there is a need for extensive services in aural rehabilitation for this population. This includes identifying the need of assistive listening devices, teaching the individual with HI about communication strategies and informing stakeholders about the consequence of having a HI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keyword
Conceptions; employees; fatigue; hearing impairment; labor market; noise; phenomenography; withdrawal
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123811 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2015.1060640 (DOI)000366449600012 ()26140299 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|AFA Insurance.

The previous status of this article was Manuscript and the working title was Being part of the labor market: conceptions among employees with aided hearing impairment.

Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Mäki-Torkko, E., Vestergren, S., Harder, H. & Lyxell, B. (2015). From isolation and dependence to autonomy - expectations before and experiences after cochlear implantation in adult cochlear implant users and their significant others. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(6), 541-547
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From isolation and dependence to autonomy - expectations before and experiences after cochlear implantation in adult cochlear implant users and their significant others
2015 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 541-547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine pre-operative expectations and the postoperative experiences related to cochlear implants (CI) in CI-users and their significant others. Methods: A questionnaire was used and the responses were analysed by means of The Qualitative Content Analysis. All adults implanted between 1992 and 2010, who had had their implants for a minimum of 12 months (n = 120) were contacted. Response rate was high (90.8%), and all-inclusive answers were received from 101 CI-users (84.2%). Results: The overall sense of increased well-being and life satisfaction was described as having lived in two different worlds, one with the auditory stimulation and one without. In the overall sense of increased well-being and satisfaction three interwoven subcategories, alienation - normality, fear - autonomy, and living a social life emerged. When CI-users and their significant others recalled the time prior to receiving the CI, a sense of fear was present with origins in the concern for the respondents (CI-users) ability to cope and care independently in society. Conversely, after the implantation both parties emphasized the notion of a distinct transformation within the CI-user towards autonomy. Communication was highlighted as a large part of living social life. Conclusion: The CI increases well-being and satisfaction for both CI-users and their significant others, which is especially evident regarding enhanced autonomy, normality and living social life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keyword
Autonomy; cochlear implant; experience; hearing loss; well-being
National Category
Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116978 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2014.935490 (DOI)000351007500009 ()24989065 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Association of Hard of Hearing People; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2010-0761]

Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Boisvert, I., McMahon, C. M., Dowell, R. C. & Lyxell, B. (2015). Long-Term Asymmetric Hearing Affects Cochlear Implantation Outcomes Differently in Adults with Pre- and Postlingual Hearing Loss. PLoS ONE, 10(6), Article ID e0129167.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Asymmetric Hearing Affects Cochlear Implantation Outcomes Differently in Adults with Pre- and Postlingual Hearing Loss
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, article id e0129167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In many countries, a single cochlear implant is offered as a treatment for a bilateral hearing loss. In cases where there is asymmetry in the amount of sound deprivation between the ears, there is a dilemma in choosing which ear should be implanted. In many clinics, the choice of ear has been guided by an assumption that the reorganisation of the auditory pathways caused by longer duration of deafness in one ear is associated with poorer implantation outcomes for that ear. This assumption, however, is mainly derived from studies of early childhood deafness. This study compared outcomes following implantation of the better or poorer ear in cases of long-term hearing asymmetries. Audiological records of 146 adults with bilateral hearing loss using a single hearing aid were reviewed. The unaided ear had 15 to 72 years of unaided severe to profound hearing loss before unilateral cochlear implantation. 98 received the implant in their long-term sound-deprived ear. A multiple regression analysis was conducted to assess the relative contribution of potential predictors to speech recognition performance after implantation. Duration of bilateral significant hearing loss and the presence of a prelingual hearing loss explained the majority of variance in speech recognition performance following cochlear implantation. For participants with post-lingual hearing loss, similar outcomes were obtained by implanting either ear. With prelingual hearing loss, poorer outcomes were obtained when implanting the long-term sound-deprived ear, but the duration of the sound deprivation in the implanted ear did not reliably predict outcomes. Contrary to an apparent clinical consensus, duration of sound deprivation in one ear has limited value in predicting speech recognition outcomes of cochlear implantation in that ear. Outcomes of cochlear implantation are more closely related to the period of time for which the brain is deprived of auditory stimulation from both ears.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2015
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120052 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0129167 (DOI)000355701600092 ()26043227 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Macquarie University Research Excellence Scheme; HEARing CRC, under Cooperative Research Centres Program - Business Australia; Linnaeus Centre HEAD, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research

Available from: 2015-07-06 Created: 2015-07-06 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0624-2495

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