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Mäki-Torkko, Elena
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Publications (10 of 54) Show all publications
Asp, F., Mäki-Torkko, E., Karltorp, E., Harder, H., Hergils, L., Eskilsson, G. & Stenfelt, S. (2015). A longitudinal study of the bilateral benefit in children with bilateral cochlear implants. International Journal of Audiology, 54(2), 77-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of the bilateral benefit in children with bilateral cochlear implants
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To study the development of the bilateral benefit in children using bilateral cochlear implants by measurements of speech recognition and sound localization. Design: Bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet, in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization was measured at three occasions during a two-year period, without controlling for age or implant experience. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses were performed. Results were compared to cross-sectional data from children with normal hearing. Study sample: Seventy-eight children aged 5.1-11.9 years, with a mean bilateral cochlear implant experience of 3.3 years and a mean age of 7.8 years, at inclusion in the study. Thirty children with normal hearing aged 4.8-9.0 years provided normative data. Results: For children with cochlear implants, bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet was comparable whereas a bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization was found at all three test occasions. Absolute performance was lower than in children with normal hearing. Early bilateral implantation facilitated sound localization. Conclusions: A bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization continues to exist over time for children with bilateral cochlear implants, but no relative improvement is found after three years of bilateral cochlear implant experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Bilateral cochlear implants; children; release from masking; sound localization
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114231 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.973536 (DOI)000347971300003 ()25428567 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Tysta Skolan Foundation; Stockholm County Council; Karolinska Institutet; Karolinska University Hospital

Available from: 2015-02-16 Created: 2015-02-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Mäki-Torkko, E., Vestergren, S., Harder, H. & Lyxell, B. (2015). From isolation and dependence to autonomy - expectations before and experiences after cochlear implantation in adult cochlear implant users and their significant others. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(6), 541-547
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From isolation and dependence to autonomy - expectations before and experiences after cochlear implantation in adult cochlear implant users and their significant others
2015 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 541-547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine pre-operative expectations and the postoperative experiences related to cochlear implants (CI) in CI-users and their significant others. Methods: A questionnaire was used and the responses were analysed by means of The Qualitative Content Analysis. All adults implanted between 1992 and 2010, who had had their implants for a minimum of 12 months (n = 120) were contacted. Response rate was high (90.8%), and all-inclusive answers were received from 101 CI-users (84.2%). Results: The overall sense of increased well-being and life satisfaction was described as having lived in two different worlds, one with the auditory stimulation and one without. In the overall sense of increased well-being and satisfaction three interwoven subcategories, alienation - normality, fear - autonomy, and living a social life emerged. When CI-users and their significant others recalled the time prior to receiving the CI, a sense of fear was present with origins in the concern for the respondents (CI-users) ability to cope and care independently in society. Conversely, after the implantation both parties emphasized the notion of a distinct transformation within the CI-user towards autonomy. Communication was highlighted as a large part of living social life. Conclusion: The CI increases well-being and satisfaction for both CI-users and their significant others, which is especially evident regarding enhanced autonomy, normality and living social life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Autonomy; cochlear implant; experience; hearing loss; well-being
National Category
Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116978 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2014.935490 (DOI)000351007500009 ()24989065 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Association of Hard of Hearing People; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2010-0761]

Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2018-09-06
Lohi, V., Hannula, S., Ohtonen, P., Sorri, M. & Mäki-Torkko, E. (2015). Hearing impairment among adults: The impact of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors. International Journal of Audiology, 54(4), 265-273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hearing impairment among adults: The impact of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 265-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To investigate the influence of cardiovascular diseases on hearing impairment (HI) among adults. Furthermore, to seek other potential risk factors for HI, such as smoking, obesity, and socioeconomic class. Design: A cross-sectional, unscreened, population-based, epidemiological study among adults. Study sample: The subjects (n = 850), aged 54-66 years, were randomly sampled from the population register. A questionnaire survey, an otological examination, and pure-tone audiometry were performed. Results: Cardiovascular diseases did not increase the risk for HI in a propensity-score adjusted logistic regression model: OR 1.24, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.96 for HI defined by better ear hearing level (BEHL), and OR 1.48, 95% CI 0.96 to 2.28 for HI defined by worse ear hearing level (WEHL), in the 0.5-4 kHz frequency range. Heavy smoking is a risk factor for HI among men (BEHL: OR 1.96, WEHL: OR 1.88) and women (WEHL: OR 2.4). Among men, obesity (BEHL, OR 1.85) and lower socioeconomic class (BEHL: OR 2.79, WEHL: OR 2.28) are also risk factors for HI. Conclusion: No significant association between cardiovascular disease and HI was found.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Hearing impairment; adult; cardiovascular disease; diabetes; body mass index; smoking; socioeconomic class
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117796 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.974112 (DOI)000352704800008 ()25547009 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Oulu University Hospital; European ARHI Project [QLRT-2001-00331]

Available from: 2015-05-11 Created: 2015-05-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Saremi, A., Stenfelt, S. & Mäki-Torkko, E. (2014). Changes in Temporal and Spectral Functions of the Auditory Periphery Due to Aging and Noise-induced Cochlear Pathologies: A Comparative Clinical Study.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in Temporal and Spectral Functions of the Auditory Periphery Due to Aging and Noise-induced Cochlear Pathologies: A Comparative Clinical Study
2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study includes a battery of psychoacoustical and electrophysiological tests to quantitatively investigate the changes in the frequency and the temporal features of the human auditory periphery caused by aging (presbyacusis) and noise-induced lesions, two common types of sensorineural hearing impairments. The scores are comparatively analyzed.

Design: These clinical experiments have been implemented in MATLAB software.

Study sample: 20 normal hearing adults (aged 30-54), 20 older hearing-impaired subjects (aged 65-70) with no history of Ototoxic medication or noise exposure and 7 adult men with a traceable noise-induced hearing impairment.

Results: The observed temporal and spectral declines are generally consistent with the high-frequency audiometric loss depicted by the audiogram, for each group. Moreover, the test battery provides valuable information on the frequency sensitivity, temporal resolution, loudness growth, compression and otoacoustic emissions.

Conclusion: These scores are compared with the predictions of a physiologicallybased cochlear model to provide evidence about specific inner-ear pathologies, beyond what the audiogram can indicate. Among these 7 clinical experiments, the results from the forward temporal masking test, the categorical loudness discrimination test and the distortion product otoacoustic emission test provide the most differential information about the underlying cellular lesions. The results indicate that the reduction in the temporal resolution is substantially age-relate since the presbyacusis listeners, unlike the other groups, obtained almost no benefit from the temporal cues provided by the gap duration at any of the experiments. Moreover, the results suggest that the DPOAEs reflect the cellular lesions associated with the acoustic overstimulation rather than the age-related strial degenerations.

Keywords
Inner ear pathologies, Cochlear lesion, Sensorineural hearing impairment, Auditory models
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105809 (URN)
Available from: 2014-04-08 Created: 2014-04-08 Last updated: 2015-04-01Bibliographically approved
Lyxell, B., Wass, M., Sahlén, B., Uhlén, I., Möller, C., Henricson, C., . . . Mäki-Torkko, E. (2013). Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids. In: : . Paper presented at Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping University, Sweden, June 16-19, 2013. (pp. 114).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive and communicative development in deaf and hearing-impaired children with cochlear implants and/or hearing-aids
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2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the study was to examine neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development in deaf and hearing-impaired children (5–7 years of age) with CI and/or hearingaids and how a phonological intervention programme may influence this development. The deaf and hearing-impaired children were compared with age-matched hearing children. The results reveal that deaf and hearing-impaired children had equivalent or close to equivalent performance levels compared to hearing children for cognitive and linguistic tasks with relatively low demands on phonological processing, whereas there was a substantial and significant difference between the groups for cognitive tasks involving explicit phonological processing. The results indicate that there is a relationship between age at implant and neurophysiological, cognitive and linguistic development, where early implantation promotes faster development. The childrens´ cognitive performance increased as a function of phonological intervention.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103053 (URN)
Conference
Second International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping University, Sweden, June 16-19, 2013.
Available from: 2014-01-12 Created: 2014-01-12 Last updated: 2014-01-28
Hendrickx, J.-J., Huyghe, J., Topsakal, V., Demeester, K., Wienker, T., Van Laer, L., . . . Van de Heyning, P. (2013). Familial Aggregation of Pure Tone Hearing Thresholds in an Aging European Population. Otology and Neurotology, 34(5), 838-844
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Familial Aggregation of Pure Tone Hearing Thresholds in an Aging European Population
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2013 (English)In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 838-844Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the familial correlations and intraclass correlation of age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in specific frequencies. In addition, heritability estimates were calculated.

STUDY DESIGN:

Multicenter survey in 8 European centers.

SUBJECTS:

One hundred ninety-eight families consisting of 952 family members, screened by otologic examination and structured interviews. Subjects with general conditions, known to affect hearing thresholds or known otologic cause were excluded from the study.

RESULTS:

We detected familial correlation coefficients of 0.36, 0.37, 0.36, and 0.30 for 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 kHz, respectively, and correlation coefficients of 0.20 and 0.18 for 4 and 8 kHz, respectively. Variance components analyses showed that the proportion of the total variance attributable to family differences was between 0.32 and 0.40 for 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 kHz and below 0.20 for 4 and 8 kHz. When testing for homogeneity between sib pair types, we observed a larger familial correlation between female than male subjects. Heritability estimates ranged between 0.79 and 0.36 across the frequencies.

DISCUSSION:

Our results indicate that there is a substantial shared familial effect in ARHI. We found that familial aggregation of ARHI is markedly higher in the low frequencies and that there is a trend toward higher familial aggregation in female compared with male subjects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-101453 (URN)10.1097/MAO.0b013e318288646a (DOI)000330371400014 ()23739559 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-11-22 Created: 2013-11-22 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Lyxell, B., Wass, M., Sahlén, B., Ibertsson, T., Asker-Árnason, L., Uhlén, I., . . . Möller, C. (2013). Hearing and cognitive development in deaf and hearing-impaired children: effects of intervention. In: Gastone Celesia (Ed.), Disorders of Peripheral and Central Auditory Processing: (pp. 71-80). Amsterdam: Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hearing and cognitive development in deaf and hearing-impaired children: effects of intervention
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2013 (English)In: Disorders of Peripheral and Central Auditory Processing / [ed] Gastone Celesia, Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013, p. 71-80Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2013
Series
Handbook of Clinical Neurophysiology, ISSN 1567-4231 ; 10
Keywords
Word deafness, Word deafness in children, Auditory pathways, Ear, Auditory Pathways physiology, Auditory Pathways physiopathology, Hearing Disorders diagnosis
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100639 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-7020-5310-8.00004-1 (DOI)978-0-7020-5310-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-11-10 Created: 2013-11-10 Last updated: 2014-10-30Bibliographically approved
Hesser, H., Gustafsson, T., Lundén, C., Henrikson, O., Fattahi, K., Johnsson, E., . . . Andersson, G. (2012). A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 80(4), 649-661
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 80, no 4, p. 649-661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were significantly distressed by tinnitus were recruited from the community. Participants were randomly assigned to CBT (n = 32), ACT (n = 35), or a control condition (monitored Internet discussion forum; n = 32), and they were assessed with standardized self-report measures (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; Quality of Life Inventory; Perceived Stress Scale; Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire) at pre-, posttreatment (8 weeks), and 1-year follow-up. Results: Mixed-effects linear regression analysis of all randomized participants showed significant effects on the primary outcome (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory) for CBT and for ACT compared with control at posttreatment (95% CI [-17.03, -2.94], d = 0.70, and 95% CI [-16.29, -2.53], d = 0.68, respectively). Within-group effects were substantial from pretreatment through 1-year-follow-up for both treatments (95% CI [-44.65, -20.45], d = 1.34), with no significant difference between treatments (95% CI [-14.87, 11.21], d = 0.16). Conclusions: Acceptance-based procedures may be a viable alternative to traditional CBT techniques in the management of tinnitus. The Internet can improve access to psychological interventions for tinnitus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, DC, USA: American Psychological Association (APA), 2012
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76865 (URN)10.1037/a0027021 (DOI)000306861800011 ()22250855 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-04-20 Created: 2012-04-20 Last updated: 2018-12-12Bibliographically approved
Asp, F., Mäki-Torkko, E., Karltorp, E., Harder, H., Hergils, L., Eskilsson, G. & Stenfelt, S. (2012). Bilateral versus unilateral cochlear implants in children: Speech recognition, sound localization, and parental reports. International Journal of Audiology, 51(11), 817-832
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilateral versus unilateral cochlear implants in children: Speech recognition, sound localization, and parental reports
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2012 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 817-832Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To compare bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet and in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization of low and high frequency sounds in children with bilateral cochlear implants. Design: Bilateral performance was compared to performance of the implanted side with the best monaural speech recognition in quiet result. Parental reports were collected in a questionnaire. Results from the CI children were compared to binaural and monaural performance of normal-hearing peers. Study sample: Sixty-four children aged 5.1-11.9 years who were daily users of bilateral cochlear implants. Thirty normal-hearing children aged 4.8-9.0 years were recruited as controls. Results and Conclusions : Group data showed a statistically significant bilateral speech recognition and sound localization benefit, both behaviorally and in parental reports. The bilateral speech recognition benefit was smaller in quiet than in noise. The majority of subjects localized high and low frequency sounds significantly better than chance using bilateral implants, while localization accuracy was close to chance using unilateral implants. Binaural normal-hearing performance was better than bilateral performance in implanted children across tests, while bilaterally implanted children showed better localization than normal-hearing children under acute monaural conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2012
Keywords
Bilateral cochlear implants, children, release from masking, sound localization, parental reports
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85292 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2012.705898 (DOI)000309746600004 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|ALF grants from Stockholm City Council||

Available from: 2012-11-19 Created: 2012-11-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Boisvert, I., Lyxell, B., Mäki-Torkko, E., McMahon, C. M. & Dowell, R. C. (2012). Choice of Ear for Cochlear Implantation in Adults With Monaural Sound-Deprivation and Unilateral Hearing Aid. Otology and Neurotology, 33(4), 572-579
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choice of Ear for Cochlear Implantation in Adults With Monaural Sound-Deprivation and Unilateral Hearing Aid
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2012 (English)In: Otology and Neurotology, ISSN 1531-7129, E-ISSN 1537-4505, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 572-579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To identify whether speech recognition outcomes are influenced by the choice of ear for cochlear implantation in adults with bilateral hearing loss who use a hearing aid in 1 ear but have long-term auditory deprivation in the other. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanStudy Design: Retrospective matched cohort study. Speech recognition results were examined in 30 adults with monaural sound deprivation. Fifteen received the implant in the sound-deprived ear and 15 in the aided ear. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting: Tertiary referral centers with active cochlear implant programs. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPatients: Adults with bilateral hearing loss and a minimum of 15 years of monaural sound deprivation who received a cochlear implant after meeting the traditional implantation criteria of the referral centers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanIntervention: Cochlear implantation with devices approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain Outcome Measure(s): Paired comparisons of postoperative monosyllabic word recognition scores obtained with the implant alone and in the usual listening condition (CI alone or bimodal). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: With the cochlear implant alone, individuals who received the implant in a sound-deprived ear obtained poorer scores than individuals who received the implant in the aided ear. There was no significant difference, however, in speech recognition results for the 2 groups when tested in their usual listening condition. In particular, poorer speech recognition scores were obtained with the cochlear implant alone by individuals using bimodal hearing. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Similar clinical outcomes of cochlear implantation can be achieved by adults with a long-term monaural sound deprivation when comparing the usual listening condition, irrespective of whether the implant is in the sound-deprived or in the aided ear.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 2012
Keywords
Adults, Auditory deprivation, Choice of ear, Cochlear implant, Outcomes, Speech perception, Unilateral hearing aid
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78568 (URN)10.1097/MAO.0b013e3182544cdb (DOI)000304315900016 ()
Note
Funding Agencies|Macquarie University||HEARing CRC||Australian Government||HEAD Graduate School in Sweden||Available from: 2012-06-15 Created: 2012-06-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07
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