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Anderson, Chris D
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Publications (10 of 82) Show all publications
Toll John, R., Henricson, J., Junker, J., Jonson, C.-O., Nilsson, G., Björk Wilhelms, D. & Anderson, C. D. (2018). A cool response: the influence of ambient temperature on capillary refill time. Journal of Biophotonics, 11(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cool response: the influence of ambient temperature on capillary refill time
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Biophotonics, ISSN 1864-063X, E-ISSN 1864-0648, Vol. 11, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To describe the effect of low ambient temperature on skin temperature and capillary refill (CR) time in forehead, sternum and finger pulp.

Methods

An observational, nonrandomized experimental study on 15 healthy subjects (6 females) in a cold room (8°C). Outcome measures were skin temperature and quantified CR test after application of a standardized blanching pressure (9 N/cm2) using digital photographic polarization spectroscopy to generate CR times.

Results

The finger pulp showed marked temperature fall and prolonged CR times (>10 seconds). The CR registrations of the forehead and sternum were more comparable to curves observed in a control material at room temperature, and skin temperature falls were less marked. CR times were not prolonged in forehead measurements. At the sternum, some individuals showed CR times beyond guideline recommendations despite only a marginal reduction in skin temperature.

Conclusions

Low ambient temperature is a strong independent factor for CR time at peripheral sites. Reservation about sternum as a site of measurement is warranted since cold provocation produced prolonged CR times in some individuals. We found that the forehead is the most thermostable of the 3 sites and thus the preferred site to avoid ambient temperature artifact in measuring CR time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2018
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145527 (URN)10.1002/jbio.201700371 (DOI)000434641700017 ()29384267 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Socialstyrelsen; Region Ostergotland

Available from: 2018-03-05 Created: 2018-03-05 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Fernando, G. J. P., Hickling, J., Flores, C. M. J., Griffin, P., Anderson, C. D., Skinner, S. R., . . . Forster, A. H. (2018). Safety, tolerability, acceptability and immunogenicity of an influenza vaccine delivered to human skin by a novel high-density microprojection array patch (Nanopatch (TM)). Vaccine, 36(26), 3779-3788
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Safety, tolerability, acceptability and immunogenicity of an influenza vaccine delivered to human skin by a novel high-density microprojection array patch (Nanopatch (TM))
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2018 (English)In: Vaccine, ISSN 0264-410X, E-ISSN 1873-2518, Vol. 36, no 26, p. 3779-3788Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Injection using needle and syringe (Namp;S) is the most widely used method for vaccination, but requires trained healthcare workers. Fear of needles, risk of needle-stick injury, and the need to reconstitute lyophilised vaccines, are also drawbacks. The Nanopatch (NP) is a microarray skin patch comprised of a high-density array of microprojections dry-coated with vaccine that is being developed to address these shortcomings. Here we report a randomised, partly-blinded, placebo-controlled trial that represents the first use in humans of the NP to deliver a vaccine. Methods: Healthy volunteers were vaccinated once with one of the following: (1) NPs coated with split inactivated influenza virus (A/California/07/2009 [H1N1], 15 mu g haemagglutinin (HA) per dose), applied to the volar forearm (NP-HAIFA), n = 15; (2) NPs coated with split inactivated influenza virus (A/California/07/2009 11-11N1 I, 15 mu g HA per dose), applied to the upper arm (NP-HA/UA), n = 15; (3) Fluvaxe (R) 2016 containing 15 mu g of the same H1N1 HA antigen injected intramuscularly (IM) into the deltoid (IM-HA/D), n = 15; (4) NPs coated with excipients only, applied to the volar forearm (NP-placebo/FA), n = 5; (5) NPs coated with excipients only applied to the upper arm (NP-placebo/UA), n = 5; or (6) Saline injected IM into the deltoid (IM-placebo/D), n = 5. Antibody responses at days 0, 7, and 21 were measured by haemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and microneutralisation (MN) assays. Findings: NP vaccination was safe and acceptable; all adverse events were mild or moderate. Most subjects (55%) receiving patch vaccinations (HA or placebo) preferred the NP compared with their past experience of IM injection with Namp;S (preferred by 24%). The antigen-vaccinated groups had statistically higher HAI titres at day 7 and 21 compared with baseline (p amp;lt; 0.0001), with no statistical differences between the treatment groups (p amp;gt; 0.05), although the group sizes were small. The geometric mean HAI titres at day 21 for the NP-HA/FA, NP-HA/UA and IM-HA/D groups were: 335 (189-593 95% CI), 160 (74-345 95% CI), and 221 (129-380 95% CI) respectively. A similar pattern of responses was seen with the MN assays. Application site reactions were mild or moderate, and more marked with the influenza vaccine NPs than with the placebo or IM injection. Interpretation: Influenza vaccination using the NP appeared to be safe, and acceptable in this first time in humans study, and induced similar immune responses to vaccination by IM injection. (C) 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2018
Keywords
Microarray patch; Microneedle patch; Nanopatch; Transcutaneous vaccination; Influenza; Clinical trial
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149717 (URN)10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.05.053 (DOI)000436216700010 ()29779922 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Vaxxas Pty Ltd, Brisbane, QLD, Australia [ACTRN12616000880448]

Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2019-05-02
Mernelius, S., Carlsson, E., Henricson, J., Löfgren, S., Lindgren, P.-E., Ehricht, R., . . . Anderson, C. (2016). Staphylococcus aureus colonization related to severity of hand eczema. European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 35(8), 1355-1361
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Staphylococcus aureus colonization related to severity of hand eczema
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2016 (English)In: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0934-9723, E-ISSN 1435-4373, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 1355-1361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Knowledge on Staphylococcus aureus colonization rates and epidemiology in hand eczema is limited. The aim of this study was to clarify some of these issues. Samples were collected by the "glove juice" method from the hands of 59 patients with chronic hand eczema and 24 healthy individuals. Swab samples were taken from anterior nares and throat from 43 of the 59 patients and all healthy individuals. S. aureus were spa typed and analysed by DNA-microarray-based genotyping. The extent of the eczema was evaluated by the hand eczema extent score (HEES). The colonization rate was higher on the hands of hand eczema patients (69 %) compared to healthy individuals (21 %, p amp;lt; 0.001). This was also seen for bacterial density (p = 0.002). Patients with severe hand eczema (HEES a parts per thousand yen 13) had a significantly higher S. aureus density on their hands compared to those with milder eczema (HEES = 1 to 12, p = 0.004). There was no difference between patients and healthy individuals regarding colonization rates in anterior nares or throat. spa typing and DNA-microarray-based genotyping indicated certain types more prone to colonize eczematous skin. Simultaneous colonization, in one individual, with S. aureus of different types, was identified in 60-85 % of the study subjects. The colonization rate and density indicate a need for effective treatment of eczema and may have an impact on infection control in healthcare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130833 (URN)10.1007/s10096-016-2672-2 (DOI)000380089800017 ()27193891 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Futurum - the Academy of Healthcare, County Council, Jonkoping; Medeca Pharma AB, Uppsala

Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-26 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, E., Anderson, C., Henricsson, J. & Falk, M. (2015). Validation of phototesting for estimation of individual skin ultraviolet sensitivity based on a lengthwise attenuating ultraviolet B field.. Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, 39(2), 91-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of phototesting for estimation of individual skin ultraviolet sensitivity based on a lengthwise attenuating ultraviolet B field.
2015 (English)In: Journal of Medical Engineering & Technology, ISSN 0309-1902, E-ISSN 1464-522X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 91-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conventional skin UV-sensitivity phototesting is based on semi-quantitative assessment of minimal erythema dose (MED). This study demonstrates a method for quantitative MED determination, using a lengthwise attenuating UVB-field combined with tissue viability imaging (TiVi). The study aim was to investigate the agreement between MED acquired by traditional phototest and by the new method. Forty-seven voluntary subjects underwent phototesting with a traditional phototest and with the new technique. Test reading, carried out after 24 h, showed moderate agreement between the methods when assessed with TiVi (Kappa value=0.46) and visually (Kappa value=0.48). For the new method, no systematic differences were seen between outcomes assessed with TiVi or visually (95% CI for the mean difference=-1.6-2.0). In conclusion, the results give promising support for the concept of achieving a more precise MED estimation by combining continuous attenuating UV fields with new available bioengineering technology.

National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115793 (URN)10.3109/03091902.2014.980523 (DOI)25429800 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-19 Created: 2015-03-19 Last updated: 2019-02-11
Detert, H., Hedlund, S., Anderson, C., Rodvall, Y., Festin, K., Whiteman, D. C. & Falk, M. (2015). Validation of sun exposure and protection index (SEPI) for estimation of sun habits. Cancer Epidemiology, 39(6), 986-993
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of sun exposure and protection index (SEPI) for estimation of sun habits
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2015 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 986-993Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: In both Sweden and Australia high incidence rates of skin cancer have become a major health problem. In prevention and risk communication, it is important to have reliable ways for identifying people with risky sun habits. In this study the validity and reliability of the questionnaire Sun Exposure Protection Index (SEPI), developed to assess individuals sun habits and their propensity to increase sun protection during routine, often brief, clinical encounters, has been evaluated. The aim of our study was to evaluate validity and reliability of the proposed SEPI scoring instrument, in two countries with markedly different ultraviolet radiation environments (Sweden and Australia). Method: Two subpopulations in Sweden and Australia respectively were asked to fill out the SEPI together with the previously evaluated Readiness to Alter Sun Protective Behaviour questionnaire (RASP-B) and the associated Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire. To test reliability, the SEPI was again filled out by the subjects one month later. Results: Comparison between SEPI and the questions in the Sun-protective Behaviours Questionnaire, analyzed with Spearmans Rho, showed good correlations regarding sun habits. Comparison between SEPI and RASP-B regarding propensity to increase sun protection showed concurrently lower SEPI mean scores for action stage, but no difference between precontemplation and contemplation stages. The SEPI test-retest analysis indicated stability over time. Internal consistency of the SEPI, assessed with Cronbachs alpha estimation showed values marginally lower than the desired >0.70 coefficient value generally recommended, and was somewhat negatively affected by the question on sunscreen use, likely related to the classic "sunscreen paradox". There were some differences in the performance of the SEPI between the Swedish and Australian samples, possibly due to the influence of "available" sunlight and differing attitudes to behaviour and protection "at home" and on vacation. Conclusions: SEPI appears to be a stable instrument with an overall acceptable validity and reliability, applicable for use in populations exposed to different UVR environments, in order to evaluate individual sun exposure and protection. (C) 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2015
Keywords
Skin cancer; Sun habits; Sun protection; Ultraviolet exposure; Questionnaire
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124511 (URN)10.1016/j.canep.2015.10.022 (DOI)000367444300028 ()26547793 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Sundbom, P., Hübbert, L., Armeryd, T., Karlsson, M., Lindén, M. & Anderson, C. (2014). The place of skin cancer screening in heart transplant recipient follow-up protocols: a case series. Paper presented at Enliven: Surgery and Transplantation. Enliven: Surgery and Transplantation, 1(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The place of skin cancer screening in heart transplant recipient follow-up protocols: a case series
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2014 (English)In: Enliven: Surgery and Transplantation, ISSN 2379-5719, Vol. 1, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectivesFor solid organ transplant recipients the risk of skin cancer is markedly increased due to immunosuppression. Many studies propose an annual, or morefrequent, skin screening program by a dermatologist. As the number of transplant recipients increases and survival times improve, the need for screeningand rapid response (as required) access is increasing.

DesignIn a quality control study we retrospectively examined the medical records of patients participating in an annual screening program between 1997 and2012. A total of 69 medical records were studied and we here describe the program and present the findings.

ResultsWe found malignant melanoma in 3 cases. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma occurred in 16 patients and basal cell carcinoma in 12 patients. Themost frequent skin lesions were actinic keratoses, reported in 20 patients.

ConclusionsIncidence rates for all diagnoses were elevated compared to the general population. Awareness of the increased risk for skin malignancies is of importanceto those involved in the care of solid organ transplant recipients. Routines for early discovery of skin tumors are needed both in the form of screening,which can also establish risk group status and give preventive education, and as rapid response access for skin lesion diagnosis and treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Enliven Archive, 2014
Keywords
Cutanous squamous cell carcinoma; Heart transplant; Screening; Skin cancer
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114002 (URN)
Conference
Enliven: Surgery and Transplantation
Available from: 2015-02-05 Created: 2015-02-05 Last updated: 2019-01-31
ODoherty, J., Henricson, J., Falk, M. & Anderson, C. (2013). Correcting for possible tissue distortion between provocation and assessment in skin testing: The divergent beam UVB photo-test. Skin research and technology, 19(4), 368-374
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correcting for possible tissue distortion between provocation and assessment in skin testing: The divergent beam UVB photo-test
2013 (English)In: Skin research and technology, ISSN 0909-752X, E-ISSN 1600-0846, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 368-374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundIn tissue viability imaging (TiVi), an assessment method for skin erythema, correct orientation of skin position from provocation to assessment optimizes data interpretation. Image processing algorithms could compensate for the effects of skin translation, torsion and rotation realigning assessment images to the position of the skin at provocation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethodsA reference image of a divergent, UVB phototest was acquired, as well as test images at varying levels of translation, rotation and torsion. Using 12 skin markers, an algorithm was applied to restore the distorted test images to the reference image. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResultsThe algorithm corrected torsion and rotation up to approximately 35 degrees. The radius of the erythemal reaction and average value of the input image closely matched that of the reference images true value. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusionThe image de-warping procedure improves the robustness of the response image evaluation in a clinical research setting and opens the possibility of the correction of possibly flawed images performed away from the laboratory setting by the subject/patient themselves. This opportunity may increase the use of photo-testing and, by extension, other late response skin testing where the necessity of a return assessment visit is a disincentive to performance of the test.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
tissue viability imaging, TiVi, photo-test, spectroscopy, image correction
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100468 (URN)10.1111/srt.12055 (DOI)000325547300002 ()
Available from: 2013-11-08 Created: 2013-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Falk, M. & Anderson, C. (2013). Influence of age, gender, educational level and self-estimation of skin type on sun exposure habits and readiness to increase sun protection. Cancer Epidemiology, 37(2), 127-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of age, gender, educational level and self-estimation of skin type on sun exposure habits and readiness to increase sun protection
2013 (English)In: Cancer Epidemiology, ISSN 1877-7821, E-ISSN 1877-783X, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 127-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sun exposure habits and the propensity to undertake sun protection differ between individuals. Not least in primary prevention of skin cancer, aiming at reducing ultraviolet (UV) exposure, knowledge about these factors may be of importance. The aim of the present study was to investigate, in a primary health care (PHC) population, the relationship between sun exposure habits/sun protection behaviour/readiness to increase sun protection and gender, age, educational level and skin UV-sensitivity. Methods: The baseline data from a previously performed RCT on skin cancer prevention was used. 415 patients, aged andgt;18 years, visiting a PHC centre in southern Sweden, filled-out a questionnaire mapping sun exposure, readiness to increase sun protection according to the Transtheoretical Model of Behaviour Change (TTM), and the above mentioned factors. Results: Female gender was associated with more frequent suntanning (p andlt; 0.001) and sunbed use (p andlt; 0.05), but also with more extensive sunscreen use (p andlt; 0.001). High age was in general associated with low level of sun exposure and high level of protection. Subjects with low educational level reported less frequent sunscreen use than those with higher educational level, and also chose lower SPF (p andlt; 0.001). For almost all parameters, high skin UV-sensitivity was associated with markedly lower sun exposure (p andlt; 0.001) and more pronounced readiness to increase sun protection. Females and subjects with high educational level reported higher readiness to increase sunscreen use than males and subjects with lower educational level (p andlt; 0.001). Conclusions: Gender, age, educational level and skin type appear to be important factors affecting sun exposure habits and sun protection behaviour, which supports the idea of appropriate mapping of these factors in patients in order to individualise sun protection advice according to the individual patient situation and capabilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Sun exposure, Sun protection behaviour, Behaviour change, Demographic factors, Skin type
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-92705 (URN)10.1016/j.canep.2012.12.006 (DOI)000317415700004 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland||

Available from: 2013-05-16 Created: 2013-05-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Sjögren, F., Davidsson, K., Sjöström, M. & Anderson, C. (2012). Cutaneous Microdialysis: Cytokine Evidence for Altered Innate Reactivity in the Skin of Psoriasis Patients?. AAPS Journal, 14(2), 187-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cutaneous Microdialysis: Cytokine Evidence for Altered Innate Reactivity in the Skin of Psoriasis Patients?
2012 (English)In: AAPS Journal, ISSN 1550-7416, E-ISSN 1550-7416, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 187-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cutaneous microdialysis demonstrates cytokine production in living human skin. In the present study, microdialysis samples taken from uninvolved and lesional skin in three test subjects with psoriasis over 24 h have been investigated for cytokine content with a bead-based multiplex immunoassay from Luminex. Concentration curves for a set of Th1/Th2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines measured differed from a reference group of ten subjects without psoriasis. The time to return to near baseline values after innate insertion reactivity is between 9 and 16 h. Post-equilibration levels (17-24 h) for the three main cytokines elevated in the reference group were differentially elevated outside the range of the reference group for interleukin-1 beta (IL1 beta) and IL8 but not so for IL6. Two further cytokines, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha not generally elevated in the reference group, showed elevated values in the test subjects. Multivariate time series analysis (chemometry) showed that cytokine patterns for the individual test subjects often fell outside the 99% confidence intervals of a model generated from the reference group. In a clinical research situation, cutaneous microdialysis is feasible, gives generally higher cytokine levels than in the blood and generates interpretable data on an individuals reactivity compared with a reference group. This may well prove useful in delineation of pathogenetic issues, selection of appropriate therapy and monitoring of subsequent response in inflammatory dermatoses such as psoriasis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, 2012
Keywords
cytokines, dermis, human, microdialysis, multivariate time series analysis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77319 (URN)10.1208/s12248-012-9331-z (DOI)000302814900005 ()
Note
Funding Agencies|Swedish Psoriasis Foundation||Welander Foundation||Available from: 2012-05-11 Created: 2012-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Seifert, O., Matussek, A., Sjögren, F., Geffers, R. & Anderson, C. (2012). Gene expression profiling of macrophages: implications for an immunosuppressive effect of dissolucytotic gold ions. Journal of Inflammation, 9(43)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gene expression profiling of macrophages: implications for an immunosuppressive effect of dissolucytotic gold ions
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Inflammation, ISSN 1476-9255, E-ISSN 1476-9255, Vol. 9, no 43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Gold salts has previously been used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis but have been replaced by biologicals such as TNF-alpha inhibitors. The mechanisms behind the anti-inflammatory effect of metallic gold ions are still unknown, however, recent data showed that charged gold atoms are released from pure metallic gold implants by macrophages via a dissolucytosis membrane, and that gold ions are taken up by local macrophages, mast cells and to some extent fibroblasts. These findings open the question of possible immunomodulatory effects of metallic gold and motivate efforts on a deeper understanding of the effect of metallic gold on key inflammatory cells as macrophages. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: Human macrophage cells (cell line THP-1) were grown on gold foils and intracellular uptake was analysed by autometallography. The impact of phagocytised gold ions on viability of THP-1 cells was investigated by trypan blue staining and TUNEL assay. The global gene expression profile of THP-1 cells after incorporation of gold ions was studied using microarray analysis comprising approximately 20,000 genes. The gene expression data was confirmed by measurement of secreted proteins. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Autometallography showed intracellular uptake of gold ions into THP-1 cells. No significant effect on viability of THP-1 cells was demonstrated. Our data revealed a unique gene expression signature of dissolucytotic THP-1 cells that had taken up gold ions. A large number of regulated genes were functionally related to immunomodulation. Gold ion uptake induced downregulation of genes involved in rheumatoid arthritis such as hepatocyte growth factor, tenascin-C, inhibitor of DNA binding 1 and 3 and matrix metalloproteinase 13. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: The data obtained in this study offer new insights into the mode of action of gold ions and suggest for the investigation of effects on other key cells and a possible future role of metallic gold as implants in rheumatoid arthritis or other inflammatory conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2012
Keywords
Gold, Macrophages, Inflammation, Rheumatoid arthritis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87469 (URN)10.1186/1476-9255-9-43 (DOI)000312597100001 ()
Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06
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