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Rindzeviciute, Egle
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 16) Show all publications
Rindzeviciute, E., Svensson, J. & Tomson, K. (2016). The international transfer of creative industries as a policy idea. The International Journal of Cultural Policy, 22(4), 594-610
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The international transfer of creative industries as a policy idea
2016 (English)In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 594-610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the transfer of creative industries as a policy idea to Lithuania. Tracing the stages of the transfer and analysing its consequences in the local cultural policy field, this paper argues for the importance of studying cultural policy process. The findings reveal that the process of the international transfer of creative industries mattered, because it generated wider transformations in cultural policy field by having ambiguous effects on local power relations. The policy idea of creative industries opened the cultural policy field to new actors. As a result, competition for scarce state funding increased, but cultural organisations gained access to the European Union structural funds. In all, creative industries as a policy idea significantly transformed Lithuanian state cultural policy, in that it led to a reassessment of both the practices and identities of cultural organisations.

Keywords
creative industries, policy transfer, the British Council, translation
National Category
Economics and Business Other Social Sciences Other Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117599 (URN)10.1080/10286632.2015.1025067 (DOI)000381410700007 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Baltic Sea Foundation (Ostersjostiftelsen) under a grant for the research project: The struggle for culture: A study of the culture of political change in Lithuania and Sweden at Sodertorn University, Sweden

Available from: 2015-05-05 Created: 2015-05-05 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Andersson, J. & Rindzeviciute, E. (Eds.). (2015). The Struggle for the Long-Term in Transnational Science and Politics: Forging the Future. London, New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Struggle for the Long-Term in Transnational Science and Politics: Forging the Future
2015 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book reconsiders the power of the idea of the future. Bringing together perspectives from cultural history, environmental history, political history and the history of science, it investigates how the future became a specific field of action in liberal democratic, state socialist and post-colonial regimes after the Second World War. It highlights the emergence of new forms of predictive scientific expertise in this period, and shows how such forms of expertise interacted with political systems of the Cold War world order, as the future became the prism for dealing with post-industrialisation, technoscientific progress, changing social values, Cold War tensions and an emerging Third World. A forgotten problem of cultural history, the future re-emerges in this volume as a fundamentally contested field in which forms of control and central forms of resistance met, as different actors set out to colonise and control and others to liberate. The individual studies of this book show how the West European, African, Romanian and Czechoslovak "long term" was constructed through forms of expertise, computer simulations and models, and they reveal how such constructions both opened up new realities but also imposed limits on possible futures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, New York: Routledge, 2015. p. 256
Series
Routledge Approaches to History
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117600 (URN)978-1-13-885853-4 (ISBN)
Projects
Futurepol
Funder
EU, European Research Council
Note

Contents

Foreword Michael D. Gordin Introduction: Toward a New History of the Future Jenny Andersson and Eglė Rindzevičiūtė

1. Midwives of the Future: Futurism, Futures Studies and the Shaping of the Global Imagination Jenny Andersson

2. Expertise for the Future: The Emergence of Environmental Prediction c.1920-1970 Paul Warde and Sverker Sörlin

3. Energy Futures from the Social Market Economy to the Energiewende: The Politicization of West German Energy Debates, 1950-1990 Stefan Cihan Aykut

4. Technoscientific Cornucopian Futures versus Doomsday Futures: The World Models and The Limits to Growth Elodie Vieille-Blanchard

5. Towards a Joint Future Beyond the Iron Curtain: East-West Politics of Global Modelling Eglė Rindzevičiūtė

6. Forecasting the Post-Socialist Future: Prognostika in Late Socialist Czechoslovakia, 1970–1989 Vítězslav Sommer

7. Official and Unofficial Futures of the Communism System: Romanian Futures Studies Between Control and Dissidence Ana-Maria Cătănuş

8. Virtually Nigeria: USAID, Simulated Futures, and the Politics of Postcolonial Expertise, 1964-1980 Kevin Baker

9. Pan-Africanism, Socialism and the Future: Development Planning in Ghana, 1951-1966 Jeff Grischow and Holger Weiss

Available from: 2015-05-05 Created: 2015-05-05 Last updated: 2015-11-13Bibliographically approved
Rindzeviciute, E. (2015). Towards a joint future beyond the iron curtain: East-West politics of global modelling. In: Egle Rindzeviciute, Jenny Andersson (Ed.), The struggle for the long-term in transnational science and politics: forging the future (pp. 115-143). London, New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards a joint future beyond the iron curtain: East-West politics of global modelling
2015 (English)In: The struggle for the long-term in transnational science and politics: forging the future / [ed] Egle Rindzeviciute, Jenny Andersson, London, New York: Routledge, 2015, p. 115-143Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, New York: Routledge, 2015
Series
Routledge Approaches to History
Keywords
öst-västrelationer
National Category
History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117601 (URN)9781138858534 (ISBN)
Funder
EU, European Research Council
Available from: 2015-05-05 Created: 2015-05-05 Last updated: 2015-11-13Bibliographically approved
Rindzeviciute, E. (2012). Book review of Emma Waterton, Politics, Policy and the Discourses of Heritage in Britain, Palgrave Macmillan 2010 [Review]. The International Journal of Cultural Policy, 18(4), 488-490
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Book review of Emma Waterton, Politics, Policy and the Discourses of Heritage in Britain, Palgrave Macmillan 2010
2012 (English)In: The International Journal of Cultural Policy, ISSN 1028-6632, E-ISSN 1477-2833, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 488-490Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: , 2012
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77130 (URN)10.1080/10286632.2011.625422 (DOI)000305211200009 ()
Available from: 2012-05-07 Created: 2012-05-07 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Rindzeviciute, E. (2012). The House of Human & Social Sciences. In: Svante Beckman (Ed.), Kulturaliseringens samhälle: Problemorienterad kulturvetenskaplig forskning vid Tema Q 2002 - 2012. Paper presented at Tema Q jubileumssymposium 19-20 januari 2012 (pp. 221-223). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The House of Human & Social Sciences
2012 (English)In: Kulturaliseringens samhälle: Problemorienterad kulturvetenskaplig forskning vid Tema Q 2002 - 2012 / [ed] Svante Beckman, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 221-223Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012
Series
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings, ISSN 1650-3686, E-ISSN 1650-3740 ; 66Skriftserie / Tema, Kultur och samhälle, Linköpings universitet, ISSN 1653-0373, E-ISSN 1654-143X ; 2012:1
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77295 (URN)9789197727525 (ISBN)
Conference
Tema Q jubileumssymposium 19-20 januari 2012
Available from: 2012-05-11 Created: 2012-05-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Rindzevičiūtė, E. (2011). Cultural Studies Travel to (and from) East Central Europe. Baltic Worlds, 4(3), 18-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultural Studies Travel to (and from) East Central Europe
2011 (English)In: Baltic Worlds, ISSN 2000-2955, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 18-19Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Huddinge, Sweden: Södertoerns Högskola - Centrum för Östersjö- och Östeuropaforskning, 2011
National Category
Other Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77055 (URN)
Available from: 2012-05-03 Created: 2012-05-03 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Rindzeviciute, E. (2011). Internal Transfer of Cybernetics and Informality in the Soviet Union: The Case of Lithuania. In: Sari Autio Sarasmo, Katalin Miklossy (Ed.), Reassessing Cold War Europe: (pp. 119-137). London and New York: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internal Transfer of Cybernetics and Informality in the Soviet Union: The Case of Lithuania
2011 (English)In: Reassessing Cold War Europe / [ed] Sari Autio Sarasmo, Katalin Miklossy, London and New York: Routledge, 2011, p. 119-137Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This book presents a comprehensive reassessment of Europe in the Cold War period, 1945-91. Contrary to popular belief, it shows that relations between East and West were based not only on confrontation and mutual distrust, but also on collaboration. The authors reveal that - despite opposing ideologies - there was in fact considerable interaction and exchange between different Eastern and Western actors (such states, enterprises, associations, organisations and individuals) irrespective of the Iron Curtain.  This book challenges both the traditional understanding of the East-West juxtaposition and the relevancy of the Iron Curtain. Covering the full period, and taking into account a range of spheres including trade, scientific-technical co-operation, and cultural and social exchanges, it reveals how smaller countries and smaller actors in Europe were able to forge and implement their agendas within their own blocs. The books suggests that given these lower-level actors engaged in mutually beneficial cooperation, often running counter to the ambitions of the bloc-leaders, the rules of Cold War interaction were not, in fact,  exclusively dictated by the superpowers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London and New York: Routledge, 2011
Series
Routledge Studies in the History of Russia and Eastern Europe ; 14
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-61024 (URN)0-415-58769-7 (ISBN)978-0-415-58769-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2010-11-02 Created: 2010-11-02 Last updated: 2014-03-24Bibliographically approved
Rindzeviciute, E. (2011). National Museums in Lithuania: A Story of State Building (1855-2010). In: Peter Aronsson & Gabriella Elgenius (Ed.), Building National Museums in Europe 1750–2010: Conference proceedings from EuNaMus, European National Museums: Identity Politics, the Uses of the Past and the European Citizen, Bologna 28-30 April 2011, Report No. 1. Paper presented at Building National Museums in Europe 1750–2010. EuNaMus, European National Museums: Identity Politics, the Uses of the Past and the European Citizen, Bologna 28-30 April 2011. EuNaMus Report No. 1 (pp. 521-552). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>National Museums in Lithuania: A Story of State Building (1855-2010)
2011 (English)In: Building National Museums in Europe 1750–2010: Conference proceedings from EuNaMus, European National Museums: Identity Politics, the Uses of the Past and the European Citizen, Bologna 28-30 April 2011, Report No. 1 / [ed] Peter Aronsson & Gabriella Elgenius, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011, p. 521-552Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The construction of national museums in Lithuania can be analysed in relation to traditional conceptualizations of European nationalism which emphasize state building through the identification of an ethnic and cultural nation situated in a particular territory (Hroch 2000). Although state building is not entirely explained by theories of nationalism, this report will broadly rely on this theoretical framework. The history of Lithuanian national museums can be divided into the following stages, based on forms of national statehood, key museums and key political oppositions:

I. The first public museums: Baublys local history museum (1812) and Vilnius Museum of Antiquities (1855-1863), were established by Lithuanian-Polish aristocrats who were interested in the political and archaeological history of Lithuania. Opposition to the Russian Empire.

II. The first state museums (1918-1940): Vytautas the Great Military Museum and Ciurlionis Art Gallery were organized by groups of Lithuanian intellectuals and established as part of a ‘national pantheon’ in Kaunas. Opposition to Poland, which occupied Vilnius.

III. The establishment of a centralized museums system (1940/1944-1990): state initiated museums were dedicated to Soviet propaganda in line with Marxism-Leninism, but groups of Lithuanian intellectuals built museums relying on the nineteenth-century template of an ethnic nation. Silent opposition to the communist regime, forgetting of the Holocaust.

IV. The consolidation of national state museums system (1990-2010): Soviet centralized administrative system was both subverted and modified to emphasize the ethnic Lithuanian dimension of nation-building through history, archaeology and culture. Opposition to Western popular culture and other perceived negative aspects of globalization, but beginning to deal with the Holocaust and communist crimes.

Stage I saw emphasis on the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (PLC), but also on the prehistory of Lithuania. In stage II, the Polish element of Lithuania’s history was represented as negative; hence there was little interest in aristocratic culture. History museums focused on the territory of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (GDL); a cult of grand dukes emerged alongside interest in Lithuanian folk culture. Jewish, Karaite and Belarusian learned societies organized ethnic museums too. During stage III, the political dimensions of ethnic nation-building were eliminated by the communist regime. However, the Lithuanian state was further constructed in museums through a history of the Middle Ages and folk culture. Aristocratic culture and the cultural heritage of the Lithuanian Jewish community did not get much space in Soviet museums, but were not completely eliminated either. The territorial focus was on the Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic (LSSR); references to the GDL were carefully censored. In stage IV the political dimension of ethnicity was brought back into the museums. Jews and Karaites were represented in existing museums or acquired their own museums. The Polish dimension of Lithuania’s history remained contested. However, there emerged new museums, dedicated to the difficult parts of twentieth century history, such as the Holocaust and communist crimes.

Note: A Full list of the abbreviations used can be found in an annexe of this report.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2011
Series
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings, ISSN 1650-3686, E-ISSN 1650-3740 ; 64
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77054 (URN)978-91-7393-070-3 (ISBN)
Conference
Building National Museums in Europe 1750–2010. EuNaMus, European National Museums: Identity Politics, the Uses of the Past and the European Citizen, Bologna 28-30 April 2011. EuNaMus Report No. 1
Available from: 2012-05-03 Created: 2012-05-03 Last updated: 2018-02-19Bibliographically approved
Rindzeviciute, E. (2010). Imagining the Grand Duchy of Lithuania: The Politics and Economics of the Rebuilding of Trakai Castle and the Palace of Sovereigns in Vilnius. CENTRAL EUROPE, 8(2), 181-203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imagining the Grand Duchy of Lithuania: The Politics and Economics of the Rebuilding of Trakai Castle and the Palace of Sovereigns in Vilnius
2010 (English)In: CENTRAL EUROPE, ISSN 1479-0963, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 181-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 1884 the prominent nation-builder Jonas Basanavicius declared that castle mounds and literature were the only appropriate elements from which to build the Lithuanian nation. Basanaviciuss view, this article suggests, had a lasting influence on the public uses of history in twentieth-century Lithuania. The study explores the construction of two iconic images of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Trakai Castle and the `Palace of Sovereigns in Vilnius. Built in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, Trakai Castle was once the seat of the Grand Duke of Lithuania, but fell into neglect before its reconstruction in the 1960s. Dating back to the thirteenth century, the Palace in Vilnius deteriorated during the eighteenth century, was dismantled at the beginning of the nineteenth, and has been completely rebuilt since 2000. It is striking that the reconstructions of castles were the largest state investments in culture in both the Soviet and post-Soviet regimes. The reconstruction of Trakai Castle was criticized on economic and ideological grounds by Nikita Khrushchev. The rebuilding of the Palace polarized Lithuanian intellectuals. The presentation compares the intellectual, social, and political rationales which underpinned the two projects and explores the changes and continuities in the uses of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania under the Soviet and post-Soviet regimes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
School of Slavonic and East European Studies,University College London, 2010
Keywords
Trakai Castle, Palace of Sovereigns, Vilnius, Grand Duchy of Lithuania, Lithuanian Soviet Socialist Republic, Republic of Lithuania, heritage
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66895 (URN)10.1179/174582110X12871342860243 (DOI)000287456600008 ()
Available from: 2011-03-21 Created: 2011-03-21 Last updated: 2011-03-21
Rindzeviciute, E. (2010). Purification and Hybridisation of Soviet Cybernetics: The Politics of Scientific Governance in an Authoritarian Regime. Archiv für Sozialgeschichte, 50, 289-309
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Purification and Hybridisation of Soviet Cybernetics: The Politics of Scientific Governance in an Authoritarian Regime
2010 (English)In: Archiv für Sozialgeschichte, ISSN 0066-6505, Vol. 50, p. 289-309Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, 2010
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-61023 (URN)
Available from: 2010-11-09 Created: 2010-11-02 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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