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Theodorsson, Annette
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Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Sinkvist, D., Theodorsson, A., Ledin, T. & Theodorsson, E. (2017). Five Year Data and Results of Continuous Quality Improvement Using SKURT. Educational Research Applications, 2017(05), Article ID ERCA-125.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Five Year Data and Results of Continuous Quality Improvement Using SKURT
2017 (English)In: Educational Research Applications, E-ISSN 2575-7032, Vol. 2017, no 05, article id ERCA-125Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Student rating of teaching isessentialfor attaining and maintaining higheducational quality.A quality improvement system, SKURT,based on digital online weekly combined quantitative, ten-graded scale, and qualitative, open-ended free text, group feedback from medical students was developed. Students rated all educational, non-clerkship, items throughout the entire medical program, spanning eleven terms. The results were semi-publicly available for students and faculty at a Swedish university. This study describes datafrom five-year use of the system,focusing on how the use of SKURT influenced educational items found to be in the most substantial need for improvements.

Statistically but hardly practically significant improvement in average feedback grade was found during the observation period (average 7.07 in 2009 to 7.24 in 2013 (p<0.001)).The medical program was already in 2007recognized ascenter of excellent quality in higher education. When analyzing the 18 lectures with lowest outcome in the spring 2009 compared to the fall 2013, five were discontinued. The remaining 13 lectures improved significantly (p<0.001) 116% from 2.94 (SD 0.92) to 6.34 (SD 2.58). 

A weekly group feedback system employing the principles used in SKURTis useful forimproving the quality of medical education particularlyby improvingthe items with the lowest ratings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IL, USA: Gavin Publishers, 2017
Keywords
Medical Education; Online Evaluation; Problem-based Learning; Quality Improvement; Rating of Teachers; Student Evaluation
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145230 (URN)10.29011/2575-7032/100025 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-02-19 Created: 2018-02-19 Last updated: 2018-02-27Bibliographically approved
Sinkvist, D., Theodorsson, A., Ledin, T. & Theodorsson, E. (2017). SKURT: Quality Improvement System with Comprehensive Weekly Digital Student Group Feedback. Educational Research Applications, 2017(5), Article ID RCA-124.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SKURT: Quality Improvement System with Comprehensive Weekly Digital Student Group Feedback
2017 (English)In: Educational Research Applications, E-ISSN 2575-7032, Vol. 2017, no 5, article id RCA-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Students’ role in evaluation and rating of teachers and education has been extensively researched for nearly a century. Applied worldwide, students’ ratings account for the majority of the available data.We created a new quality improvement system, SKURT, using digital online weekly combined quantitative, ten-graded scale, and qualitative, open-ended free text, group feedback from medical students. Students rated all educational, non-clerkship, items throughout the entire medical program, spanning eleven terms. The rating process is since 2008 an integral part of a medical program at a Swedish university. The results are, after a screening process, semi-publicly available on-demand, for students and faculty, creating a feedback loop enabling continuous improvement of quality.A thorough literature search of students rating of teaching found no other corresponding weekly group rating system spanning all educational items. Quality improvement systems based on similar principles as SKURT can uncover problem areas that are difficult to find using other rating systems and has the potential to circumvent several biases, risks and shortcomings of traditional rating systems in current use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Gavin Publishers, 2017
Keywords
Medical Education; Online Evaluation; Problem-Based Learning; Quality Improvement; Rating of Teachers; Student Evaluation
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145282 (URN)
Available from: 2018-02-20 Created: 2018-02-20 Last updated: 2018-03-08Bibliographically approved
Ivars, K., Nelson Follin, N., Theodorsson, A., Theodorsson, E., Ström, J. & Mörelius, E. (2016). Correction: Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants. PLoS ONE, 11(3), Article ID e0151888.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction: Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0151888Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Cortisol concentrations in plasma display a circadian rhythm in adults and children older than one year. Earlier studies report divergent results regarding when cortisol circadian rhythm is established. The present study aims to investigate at what age infants develop a circadian rhythm, as well as the possible influences of behavioral regularity and daily life trauma on when the rhythm is established. Furthermore, we determine age-related reference intervals for cortisol concentrations in saliva during the first year of life.

METHODS:

130 healthy full-term infants were included in a prospective, longitudinal study with saliva sampling on two consecutive days, in the morning (07:30-09:30), noon (10:00-12:00) and evening (19:30-21:30), each month from birth until the infant was twelve months old. Information about development of behavioral regularity and potential exposure to trauma was obtained from the parents through the Baby Behavior Questionnaire and the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist.

RESULTS:

A significant group-level circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol secretion was established at one month, and remained throughout the first year of life, although there was considerable individual variability. No correlation was found between development of cortisol circadian rhythm and the results from either the Baby Behavior Questionnaire or the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. The study presents salivary cortisol reference intervals for infants during the first twelve months of life.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cortisol circadian rhythm in infants is already established by one month of age, earlier than previous studies have shown. The current study also provides first year age-related reference intervals for salivary cortisol levels in healthy, full-term infants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2016
National Category
Pediatrics Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127497 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0151888 (DOI)26086734 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-28 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ingberg, E., Theodorsson, E., Theodorsson, A. & Ström, J. (2016). Effects of high and low 17 beta-estradiol doses on focal cerebral ischemia in rats. Scientific Reports, 6(20228)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of high and low 17 beta-estradiol doses on focal cerebral ischemia in rats
2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 20228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The majority of the numerous animal studies of the effects of estrogens on cerebral ischemia have reported neuroprotective results, but a few have shown increased damage. Differences in hormone administration methods, resulting in highly different 17 beta-estradiol levels, may explain the discrepancies in previously reported effects. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that it is the delivered dose per se, and not the route and method of administration, that determines the effect, and that high doses are damaging while lower doses are protective. One hundred and twenty ovariectomized female Wistar rats (n = 40 per group) were randomized into three groups, subcutaneously administered different doses of 17 beta-estradiol and subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. The modified sticky tape test was performed after 24 h and the rats were subsequently sacrificed for infarct size measurements. In contrast to our hypothesis, a significant negative correlation between 17 beta-estradiol dose and infarct size was found (p = 0.018). Thus, no support was found for the hypothesis that 17 beta-estradiol can be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic merely depending on dose. In fact, on the contrary, the findings indicate that the higher the dose of 17 beta-estradiol, the smaller the infarct.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125674 (URN)10.1038/srep20228 (DOI)000369323500001 ()26839007 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

Available from: 2016-03-02 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2017-05-03
Ingberg, E., Theodorsson, E., Theodorsson, A. & Ström, J. O. (2016). Effects of high and low 17β-estradiol doses on focal cerebral ischemia in rats.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of high and low 17β-estradiol doses on focal cerebral ischemia in rats
2016 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The majority of the numerous animal studies of the effects of estrogens on cerebral ischemia have reported neuroprotective results, but a few have shown increased damage. Differences in hormone administration methods, resulting in highly different 17β-estradiol levels, may explain the discrepancies in previously reported effects. The objective of the present study was to test the hypothesis that it is the delivered dose per se, and not the route and method of administration, that determines the effect, and that high doses are damaging while lower doses are protective. One hundred and twenty ovariectomized female Wistar rats (n=40 per group) were randomized into three groups, subcutaneously administered different doses of 17β-estradiol and subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. The modifi ed sticky tape test was performed after 24 h and the rats were subsequently sacrifi ced for infarct size measurements. In contrast to our hypothesis, a signifi cant negative correlation between 17β-estradiol dose and infarct size was found (p=0.018). Thus, no support was found for the hypothesis that 17β-estradiol can be both neuroprotective and neurotoxic merely depending on dose. In fact, on the contrary, the fi ndings indicate that the higher the dose of 17β-estradiol, the smaller the infarct.

National Category
Clinical Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123890 (URN)
Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Ingberg, E., Dock, H., Theodorsson, E., Theodorsson, A. & Ström, J. O. (2016). Method parameters’ impact on mortality and variability in mouse stroke experiments: a meta-analysis. Scientific Reports, 6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Method parameters’ impact on mortality and variability in mouse stroke experiments: a meta-analysis
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although hundreds of promising substances have been tested in clinical trials, thrombolysis currently remains the only specifi c pharmacological treatment for ischemic stroke. Poor quality, e.g. low statistical power, in the preclinical studies has been suggested to play an important role in these failures. Therefore, it would be attractive to use animal models optimized to minimize unnecessary mortality and outcome variability, or at least to be able to power studies more exactly by predicting variability and mortality given a certain experimental setup. The possible combinations of methodological parameters are innumerous, and an experimental comparison of them all is therefore not feasible. As an alternative approach, we extracted data from 334 experimental mouse stroke articles and, using a hypothesis-driven meta-analysis, investigated the method parameters’ impact on infarct size variability and mortality. The use of Swiss and C57BL6 mice as well as permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery rendered the lowest variability of the infarct size while the emboli methods increased variability. The use of Swiss mice increased mortality. Our study offers guidance for researchers striving to optimize mouse stroke models.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2016
National Category
Clinical Medicine Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123892 (URN)10.1038/srep21086 (DOI)000370034300001 ()
Note

Funding agencies:  County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

Vid tiden för disputation förelåg publikationen endast som manuskript

Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Ivars, K., Nelson Follin, N., Theodorsson, A., Theodorsson, E., Ström, J. & Mörelius, E. (2015). Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants. PLoS ONE, 10(6), Article ID e0129502.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants
Show others...
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, article id e0129502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Cortisol concentrations in plasma display a circadian rhythm in adults and children older than one year. Earlier studies report divergent results regarding when cortisol circadian rhythm is established. The present study aims to investigate at what age infants develop a circadian rhythm, as well as the possible influences of behavioral regularity and daily life trauma on when the rhythm is established. Furthermore, we determine age-related reference intervals for cortisol concentrations in saliva during the first year of life. Methods 130 healthy full-term infants were included in a prospective, longitudinal study with saliva sampling on two consecutive days, in the morning (07:30-09:30), noon (10:00-12:00) and evening (19:30-21:30), each month from birth until the infant was twelve months old. Information about development of behavioral regularity and potential exposure to trauma was obtained from the parents through the Baby Behavior Questionnaire and the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. Results A significant group-level circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol secretion was established at one month, and remained throughout the first year of life, although there was considerable individual variability. No correlation was found between development of cortisol circadian rhythm and the results from either the Baby Behavior Questionnaire or the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. The study presents salivary cortisol reference intervals for infants during the first twelve months of life. Conclusions Cortisol circadian rhythm in infants is already established by one month of age, earlier than previous studies have shown. The current study also provides first year age-related reference intervals for salivary cortisol levels in healthy, full-term infants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120229 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0129502 (DOI)000356567500051 ()26086734 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden, FORSS

Available from: 2015-07-21 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Dock, H., Theodorsson, A. & Theodorsson, E. (2015). DNA Methylation Inhibitor Zebularine Confers Stroke Protection in Ischemic Rats. TRANSLATIONAL STROKE RESEARCH, 6(4), 296-300
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DNA Methylation Inhibitor Zebularine Confers Stroke Protection in Ischemic Rats
2015 (English)In: TRANSLATIONAL STROKE RESEARCH, ISSN 1868-4483, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 296-300Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

5-Aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) confers neuroprotection in ischemic mice by inhibiting DNA methylation. Zebularine is another DNA methylation inhibitor, less toxic and more stable in aqueous solutions and, therefore more biologically suitable. We investigated Zebularines effects on brain ischemia in a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) model in order to elucidate its therapeutic potential. Male Wistar wild-type (WT) rats were randomly allocated to three treatment groups, vehicle, Zebularine 100 mu g, and Zebularine 500 mu g. Saline (10 mu L) or Zebularine (10 mu L) was administered intracerebroventricularly 20 min before 45-min occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Reperfusion was allowed after 45-min occlusion, and the rats were sacrificed at 24-h reperfusion. The brains were removed, sliced, and stained with 2 % 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) before measuring infarct size. Zebularine (500 mu g) reduced infarct volumes significantly (p less than 0.05) by 61 % from 20.7 +/- 4.2 % in the vehicle treated to 8.1 +/- 1.6 % in the Zebularine treated. Zebularine (100 mu g) also reduced infarct volumes dramatically by 55 to 9.4 +/- 1.2 %. The mechanisms behind this neuroprotection is not yet known, but the results agree with previous studies and support the notion that Zebularine-induced inhibition of DNA methyltransferase ameliorates ischemic brain injury in rats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag (Germany), 2015
Keywords
Zebularine; DNA methylation inhibitor; Ischemic stroke; Neuroprotection
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120207 (URN)10.1007/s12975-015-0397-7 (DOI)000357040400007 ()25824538 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

Available from: 2015-07-21 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2015-07-21
Ingberg, E., Gudjonsdottir, J., Theodorsson, E., Theodorsson, A. & Ström, J. (2015). Elevated body swing test after focal cerebral ischemia in rodents: methodological considerations. BMC neuroscience (Online), 16(50)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevated body swing test after focal cerebral ischemia in rodents: methodological considerations
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2015 (English)In: BMC neuroscience (Online), ISSN 1471-2202, E-ISSN 1471-2202, Vol. 16, no 50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The elevated body swing test (EBST) is a behavioral test used to evaluate experimental stroke in rodents. The basic idea is that when the animal is suspended vertically by the tail, it will swing its head laterally to the left or right depending on lesion side. In a previous study from our lab using the EBST after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo), rats swung contralateral to the infarct day 1 post-MCAo, but ipsilateral day 3 post-MCAo. This shift was unexpected and prompted us to perform the present study. First, the literature was systematically reviewed to elucidate whether a similar shift had been noticed before, and if consensus existed regarding swing direction. Secondly, an experiment was conducted to systematically investigate the suggested behavior. Eighty-three adult male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to MCAo or sham surgery and the EBST was performed up to 7 days after the lesion. Results: Both experimentally and through systematic literature review, the present study shows that the direction of biased swing activity in the EBST for rodents after cerebral ischemia can differ and even shift over time in some situations. The EBST curve for females was significantly different from that of males after the same occlusion time (p = 0.023). Conclusions: This study highlights the importance of adequate reporting of behavioral tests for lateralization and it is concluded that the EBST cannot be recommended as a test for motor asymmetry after MCAo in rats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central / Springer Verlag (Germany), 2015
Keywords
Brain infarction; Focal cerebral ischemia; Middle cerebral artery occlusion; Elevated body swing test; Rodents; Rats; Lateralization
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120862 (URN)10.1186/s12868-015-0189-8 (DOI)000358984700001 ()26242584 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Region Ostergotland/Linkoping University, Sweden

Available from: 2015-08-28 Created: 2015-08-28 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Szabó, Z., Harangi, M., Nylander, E., Ljungman, A., Theodorsson, A., Ahn, H. & Davidsson, B. (2015). How students perceive problem-based learning (PBL) group tutorials at a Swedish Medical College. Med Ed Publish, 6(17)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How students perceive problem-based learning (PBL) group tutorials at a Swedish Medical College
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2015 (English)In: Med Ed Publish, ISSN 2312-7996, Vol. 6, no 17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: student perception of problem-based learning (PBL) group tutorials was investigated at a Swedish University Medical College 27 years after the introduction of PBL into the curriculum.

Methods: a survey questionnaire comprising 43 questions answered on a Likert-type scale, together with one open question was used. The questionnaire was distributed to all 821 students taking part in the Linköping University medical program at the beginning of the Spring Term 2013. The results were subjected to explorative factor analysis, descriptive statistics and ANOVA. Responses to the open question where analyzed qualitatively by categorization.

Results: 84 per cent of the 821 students completed the survey. Four factors describing student perception were identified: 1) PBL as a method of learning; 2) the tutor’s role; 3) PBL, stress and feelings of insecurity; and 4) traditional teaching methods within the PBL curriculum. The Cronbach´s alpha value was 0,788 overall. Two hundred and seventy-six students answered the open question declaring that they would appreciate more precise aims and objectives, smaller tutorial groups, and more formal lectures.

Conclusions: the results of this study on PBL group tutorials, as seen from the student’s perspective, stress the importance of tutorial quality, tutor competence, tutorial group size and the quality and aims of the curriculum. Too much emphasis on the teacher’s research merits against the educational ones, and the inability to adapt to the needs and wishes of new generations of students seems a probable cause for the erosion of PBL.

Keywords
Problem-based learning, group work, tutors, self-directed learning
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122164 (URN)10.15694/mep.2015.006.0017 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-10-22 Created: 2015-10-22 Last updated: 2018-02-21
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