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Fejes, Andreas
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Publications (10 of 260) Show all publications
Fejes, A. & Nylander, E. (2019). Adult Education and Learning: A Pluralistic Research Field? (1ed.). In: Andeas Fejes & Erik Nylander (Ed.), Mapping out the research field of adult education and learning: (pp. 119-137). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adult Education and Learning: A Pluralistic Research Field?
2019 (English)In: Mapping out the research field of adult education and learning / [ed] Andeas Fejes & Erik Nylander, Springer, 2019, 1, p. 119-137Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

What the field of adult education research is and how it can be described has been a debated issue over the decades. Several scholars argue that the field today is heterogeneous, borrowing theories and methods from a range of disciplines. In this chapter, we take such statements as a starting point for empirical analysis. In what ways could it be argued that the field is pluralistic rather than monolithic; heterogeneous rather than homogenous? Drawing on bibliographic data of the top cited articles in three main adult education journals between 2005 and 2012, we illustrate how the citation patterns have tendencies of homogeneity when it comes to the geographical country of authorship, since the USA, UK, Australia and Canada dominate, as well as the research methods adopted, since qualitative approaches have near total dominance. Furthermore, there is a tendency to adopt similar theoretical approaches, since sociocultural perspectives, critical pedagogy and post-structuralism represent more than half of the articles in our sample. At the same time, the results of our analysis indicate signs of scholarly pluralism, for instance, in terms of authorship, since both early career researchers and established researchers are represented among the top cited publications. We conclude the chapter by arguing that empirical analysis of publication and citation patterns is important to further the development of reflexivity within the field, not least for early career researchers, who might benefit from knowledge about what has been recognized among peers as worth citing in recent times.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Lifelong Learning Book Series ; 24
Keywords
adult education, content analysis, bibliometrics
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157154 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-10946-2_7 (DOI)9783030109455 (ISBN)9783030109462 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-29 Created: 2019-05-29 Last updated: 2019-06-03
Fejes, A. (2019). Adult education and the fostering of asylum seekers as “full” citizens. International Review of Education, 65(2), 233-250
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adult education and the fostering of asylum seekers as “full” citizens
2019 (English)In: International Review of Education, ISSN 0020-8566, E-ISSN 1573-0638, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 233-250Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The role of adult education in the shaping and fostering of democratic citizens is prevalent in current transnational and national policy discussions; a significance which has been further infused by the past few years’ historically high migration flows. This article focuses specifically on the role of adult education in shaping asylum seekers into “full” citizens in Sweden. Drawing on a poststructural discursive theorisation, the author analyses policy reports as well as interviews with project managers and leaders of study circles (a particular form of collaborative adult learning in Sweden) involved in a state-funded initiative called Svenska från dag ett [Swedish from Day One]. This programme emerged in the wake of the arrival of high numbers of asylum seekers in Sweden in the autumn of 2015 and onwards, providing them with an introduction to the Swedish language and to Swedish society. The author’s analysis illustrates how a discourse on asylum seekers as “not yet citizens” emerges, where “they” still lack certain knowledge and capabilities deemed necessary to potentially become “full” citizens in Sweden. Such knowledge, besides language, concerns (Swedish) cultural and institutional (e.g. healthcare and taxation) knowledge. The article concludes by raising some questions regarding the way in which the need for country-specific language as a basis for inclusion is taken for granted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2019
Keywords
adult education, study circles, asylum seekers, citizen formation, Sweden
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154473 (URN)10.1007/s11159-019-09769-2 (DOI)000465995300003 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Linkoping University; ABF (Arbetarnas bildningsforbund, the Swedish Workers Educational Association)

Available from: 2019-02-14 Created: 2019-02-14 Last updated: 2019-06-22Bibliographically approved
Nylander, E., Österlund, L. & Fejes, A. (2019). Exploring the Adult Learning Research Field by Analysing Who Cites Whom (1ed.). In: Andreas Fejes & Erik Nylander (Ed.), Mapping out the research field of adult education and learning: (pp. 55-72). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the Adult Learning Research Field by Analysing Who Cites Whom
2019 (English)In: Mapping out the research field of adult education and learning / [ed] Andreas Fejes & Erik Nylander, Springer, 2019, 1, p. 55-72Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this article we report on findings from a large-scale bibliographic study conducted based on the citation practices within the field of research on adult learning. Our data consist of 151,261 citation links between more than 33,000 different authors whose papers were published in five leading international journals in the field of adult learning during the time period 2006–2014. By analysing the composition of the dominating citation clusters we are able to construct a telescopic view of the research field based on an accumulation of bibliographic citations. The results consist of two parts. First we go through the dominating players active in the field, their position and mutual relationship. Secondly, we derive two main structural oppositions inherent in the citation networks, one connected to the research object (studying education or work) and the second to the level of analysis (cognition or policy). We find that the most dominating tradition within adult learning the last few decades – socio- cultural perspectives on learning – occupies a very central position in the space of citations, balancing between these opposing poles. We hope that this analysis will help foster reflexivity concerning our own research practices, and will reveal the relations of dominance currently prevailing within the field of adult learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Lifelong Learning Book Series ; 24
Keywords
Adult education, bibliometrics, scientometrics, sociology of science
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157157 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-10946-2_4 (DOI)9783030109455 (ISBN)9783030109462 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-29 Created: 2019-05-29 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Dahlstedt, M. & Fejes, A. (2019). Fostering entrepreneurial citizens (1ed.). In: Magnus Dahlstedt & Andreas Fejes (Ed.), Neoliberalism and market forces in education: Lessons from Sweden (pp. 107-122). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fostering entrepreneurial citizens
2019 (English)In: Neoliberalism and market forces in education: Lessons from Sweden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt & Andreas Fejes, Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 107-122Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The focus of this chapter is the discourse of entrepreneurship education in Sweden. Drawing on a genealogical approach, the analysis draws attention to how this discourse is shaped in the curriculum today and how it has come to emerge. Focusing on two key events that constitute this discourse, responsibility and problem-solving, and tracing these events back in time, the analysis illustrates how the discourse on entrepreneurship education today shapes a specific kind of citizen, one who is responsible for themselves and who has developed a constant will and desire for learning, thus being able to adapt to the constant changing future. Such a citizen is distinctly different from the one emerging in the 1960s and 1980s, where a citizen who shows solidarity with others, and especially the weak, and who develops problem-solving skills in order to actively engage in the development of society, emerges. These results can be related to wider trends in education policy, where neoliberal rationalities have become more central, in Sweden as well as in other countries, where there has been a shift of focus, from an understanding of education as a common good, to an understanding of education as a private good.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019 Edition: 1
Keywords
Entrepreneurship education, Foucault
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155070 (URN)9781138600881 (ISBN)9780429470530 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Dahlstedt, M. & Fejes, A. (2019). Futures in line?: Occupational choice among migrant adult students in Sweden. International Journal of Lifelong Education, 38(1), 76-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Futures in line?: Occupational choice among migrant adult students in Sweden
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 76-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this article is to analyse the ways in which migration plays outin adult students’ narratives about their occupational choice and future,focusing on three individual narratives of adult students with variousexperiences of migration to Sweden. Drawing on Sara Ahmed’s conceptionof orientation, our results show how the adult students’ narrativeson their future occupations are formed on the basis of migration, pertainingto their particular experiences of being recognised as migrantOthers. Among the three students, similar challenges emerge in terms oftheir claims for belonging. One the one hand, the students do claimbelonging to the Swedish social community. On the other hand, theyare – as ‘migrants’ – repeatedly reminded of their non-belonging to thiscommunity. In various ways, they feel out of place. Although migration,in the narratives, is not played out one and the same way, but in variousways, engagement in adult education as a means of finding a job appearas the main orientation guiding the futures of the adult students, asbeing an important way of finding a future and claim one’s belonging tothe Swedish social community.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155131 (URN)10.1080/02601370.2018.1497719 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-03-19
Fejes, A., Nylund, M. & Wallin, J. (2019). How do teachers interpret and transform entrepreneurship education?. Journal of Curriculum Studies, 51(4), 554-566
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How do teachers interpret and transform entrepreneurship education?
2019 (English)In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 554-566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the last decade, entrepreneurship education has become a central curricular topic in many locations in the world. In Sweden, entrepreneurship education was implemented in the curriculum for the first time in 2011, as something that should be included in all upper secondary school pro- grammes. In this article, we focus on one of these programmes, the handicraft programme, investigating how entrepreneurship education is formulated in the latest curriculum and how teachers understand and transform such content in their teaching. Drawing on Bernstein’s concepts of classification and framing, we illustrate how entrepreneurship education in the Swedish curriculum has a ‘dual definition’, representing very different framing and classification, but still clearly belongs in a ‘market relevance’ discourse. This is expressed through the way in which the concept is transformed by teachers in their teaching. We also find that entrepreneurship education has low legitimacy among teachers, particularly when it is classified weakly. The weak framing and classification, taken together with the low legitimacy among teachers, are likely to lead to very different transformations of entre- preneurship education in different educational contexts. In the long run, this could have a negative effect on the equivalence of teaching at upper secondary school.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Entrepreneurship; vocational education; curriculum; classification; framing; market relevance
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-149506 (URN)10.1080/00220272.2018.1488998 (DOI)000474306900007 ()2-s2.0-85049219384 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2019-07-22Bibliographically approved
Fejes, A. & Nylander, E. (2019). Introduction: Mapping the Research Field on Adult Education and Learning (1ed.). In: Andreas Fejes & Erik Nylander (Ed.), Mapping out the Research Field on Adult Education and Learning: (pp. 3-13). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Mapping the Research Field on Adult Education and Learning
2019 (English)In: Mapping out the Research Field on Adult Education and Learning / [ed] Andreas Fejes & Erik Nylander, Springer, 2019, 1, p. 3-13Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

If the framing and composition of research fields are never fully fixed or saturated (Abbott 1995; Gieryn 1983), this is a particularly salient feature of the research field that deals with the education and learning of adults. Not only is the research question of adult education and learning approached from a multitude of academic disciplines – such as sociology, psychology and education – the very concepts that are used to denote this field have also undergone important changes. Such conceptual changes are visible, for instance, in the recent development whereby the model of adult education and Bildung came to be partly replaced by the notion of lifelong learning. In Europe, lifelong learning gained prominence in the policy area with the year of Lifelong Learning in 1996 and then the Memorandum on Lifelong Learning, published by the European Commission (2001), which positions lifelong learning as a central policy concept in the realisation of the Commission’s strategies. As a policy preoccupation, lifelong learning supersedes concepts of adult education (Lindeman 1926) and lifelong education (Faure 1972). The shift from focusing on education to speaking about learning is important to address in research, because it marks out a new way of conceptualising the education and learning of adults in terms of the why, the how, the what, the when and the where questions. These policy changes can also be identified within research and, particularly, in how the research field on the education and learning of adults is defined and delimited (see Chaps.  2 and  3). Thus, while it is clear that the research field of adult education and learning undergoes changes over time and is quite diverse in terms of the current choice of theories, research objects, methodologies and so on, little is known empirically about its current “state of affairs” and how it can be mapped out and characterised scientifically.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Lifelong Learning Book Series ; 24
Keywords
adult education, sociology of science, bibliometrics
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157152 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-10946-2_1 (DOI)9783030109455 (ISBN)9783030109462 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-29 Created: 2019-05-29 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Larsson, S., Fejes, A., Österlund, L. & Nylander, E. (2019). Invisible Colleges in Research on Adult Learning: A Bibliometric Study on International Scholarly Recognition (1ed.). In: Andreas Fejes & Erik Nylander (Ed.), Mapping out the research field of adult education and learning: (pp. 73-97). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Invisible Colleges in Research on Adult Learning: A Bibliometric Study on International Scholarly Recognition
2019 (English)In: Mapping out the research field of adult education and learning / [ed] Andreas Fejes & Erik Nylander, Springer, 2019, 1, p. 73-97Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

An “economy of publications and citations” has emerged in academia, where databases as Web of Science and Scopus provide tools for “quality” measurements. The assumption is that such measurements are unbiased in terms of geography, language, gender etc. This is investigated by scrutinizing the “invisible colleges”, i.e. networks of citations in adult learning/education journals, indexed by Scopus. A bibliometric analysis is made of 151,261 direct citation links in 5 journals published between 2006–2014. The outcome shows a pattern of biases: a US/UK, anglophone, male domination. It also shows how the investigated field consists of many loosely connected invisible colleges. This might make the field weak in terms of academic power.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Lifelong Learning Book Series ; 24
Keywords
adult education, bibliometrics
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157156 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-10946-2_5 (DOI)9783030109455 (ISBN)9783030109462 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-29 Created: 2019-05-29 Last updated: 2019-06-03Bibliographically approved
Fejes, A. & Dahlstedt, M. (2019). Lessons from Sweden (1ed.). In: Magnus Dahlstedt & Andreas Fejes (Ed.), Neoliberalism and market forces in education: Lessons from Sweden (pp. 231-234). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lessons from Sweden
2019 (English)In: Neoliberalism and market forces in education: Lessons from Sweden / [ed] Magnus Dahlstedt & Andreas Fejes, Routledge, 2019, 1, p. 231-234Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Through the establishment of a free school choice, the right to establish independent schools, and possibilities to make profit on publicly funded schools, Sweden has developed one of the most market-oriented education systems in the world. Currently, Chile and New Zealand are two of the few countries where similarities to the extreme market orientation in Swedish education can be traced (see Chapter 5). Even the OECD have critiqued the Swedish education system for having become too market oriented, contributing to an increase in inequalities and segregation. This critique is highly interesting in that the OECD is a global organisation that for decades has been promoting a market-liberal reform agenda throughout the world. In the report Improving Schools in Sweden – an OECD Perspective, on the state of the Swedish education system, the organisation concludes:

Providing full parental school choice can result in segregating students by ability and/or socio-economic background and generate greater inequities while not necessarily raising performance… . Swedish school choice arrangements do not currently have a consolidated approach to ensure equity while supporting quality. There are no clear guidelines for schools, and funding strategies do not necessarily prioritise disadvantaged students across all municipalities, possibly implying that independent schools become more selective towards more advantaged students, given the same student costs.

(OECD, 2015, p. 101) The current market-oriented system in Sweden was also elaborated in the school commission, commissioned by the government, delivering its final report in 2017 (SOU 2017:35). The commission was made up of researchers, as well as representatives from teacher trade unions as well as public and independent schools, and had the task to make a complete overview of the entire education system in Sweden. At large, the commission confirms, based on existing research, the assessment made by the OECD, in terms of an extreme market orientation in 232Sweden, contributing to an increase in inequality and segregation. However, rather than suggesting a makeover of the Swedish education system, as was made in the early 1990s when the market reforms were introduced and implemented, the commission provides suggestions on how the current system could be fine-tuned. Or rather, the neoliberal ideas behind the last decades’ makeover of the Swedish education system were further reinforced by the commission.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019 Edition: 1
Keywords
Neoliberalism, marketization, education, market forces
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-155059 (URN)9781138600881 (ISBN)9780429470530 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-11 Created: 2019-03-11 Last updated: 2019-03-13Bibliographically approved
Fejes, A. & Nylander, E. (Eds.). (2019). Mapping out the research field of adult education and learning (1ed.). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping out the research field of adult education and learning
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book discusses the current state of the art in research on the education and learning of adults, and how such research has been transformed through contemporary policy and research practices. Gathering contributions from leading experts in the field, the book draws on previous research, as well as new findings in order to provide a map of this research field and its contemporary history. 

The chapters address a number of questions, including: What constitutes this research field? What theories and methodologies dominate within the field? What “invisible colleges” are active in shaping this academic field, in marking out its contours and in transforming its contemporary battle zones? Who is publishing in the field and who is deemed worth citing? What is the relationship between the shift in state policy on adult education and the research that is conducted on the education and learning of adults? How has the research field changed over time in various western countries? What do these meta-reflections of the field tell us about possible future research endeavours? 

Rather than speaking from within the field, this is a book about the research field. The diversity of the chapters provide a fascinating resource for anyone interested in research on the education and learning of adults.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2019 Edition: 1
Series
Lifelong Learning Book Series ; 24
Keywords
adult education, bibliometrics, sociology of science, Vuxenutbildning, Livslångt lärande
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157151 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-10946-2 (DOI)9783030109455 (ISBN)9783030109462 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-05-29 Created: 2019-05-29 Last updated: 2019-07-30Bibliographically approved
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