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Samuelsson, Stefan
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Publications (10 of 126) Show all publications
Olson, R. K., Keenan, J. M., Byrne, B. & Samuelsson, S. (2017). Genetic and environmental influences on the development of reading and related skills. In: Cain, K., Compton, D. L., & Parrila, R. K (Ed.), Theories of Reading Development: (pp. 33-54). John Benjamins Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic and environmental influences on the development of reading and related skills
2017 (English)In: Theories of Reading Development / [ed] Cain, K., Compton, D. L., & Parrila, R. K, John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017, p. 33-54Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2017
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140659 (URN)10.1075/swll.15.03ols (DOI)9789027218117 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-07 Created: 2017-09-07 Last updated: 2017-09-15Bibliographically approved
Leijon, I., Ingemansson, F., Nelson Follin, N., Wadsby, M. & Samuelsson, S. (2016). Reading deficits in very low birthweight children are associated withvocabulary and attention issues at the age of seven. Acta Paediatrica, 105(1), 60-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading deficits in very low birthweight children are associated withvocabulary and attention issues at the age of seven
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2016 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 1, p. 60-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThis Swedish study compared reading skills between seven-year-old children with a very low birthweight (VLBW) and controls with a normal birthweight, exploring associations between reading variables and cognition, parent-rated behaviour, perinatal factors and family factors. MethodsWe studied 51 VLBW children, with no major neurodevelopmental impairments and attending their first year at a regular school, and compared them with the 51 sex- and age-matched controls. The test battery, carried out at 7.80.4years of age, included reading skills, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - III and the Child Behaviour Checklist. ResultsVery low birthweight children with a mean birthweight of 1105g (+/- 291g) and a gestational age of 28.8 (+/- 2.2) weeks scored significantly lower in all reading subtests and cognition and demonstrated more behavioural problems than normal birthweight controls. We also found significant associations between poor vocabulary, combined with attention problems, and phonological awareness, rapid naming and spelling control. Perinatal factors had no association with reading function, and socio-economic factors had very few. ConclusionVery low birthweight children demonstrated deficits in all reading domains and had poorer cognition and more behavioural problems at the age of seven, with reading ability related to vocabulary and attention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keyword
Behavioural problems; Parental factors; Reading ability; School children; Very low birthweight
National Category
Clinical Medicine Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124471 (URN)10.1111/apa.13094 (DOI)000367728500022 ()26098907 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Futurum - The Academy of Health Care; Jonkoping County Council; Ostergotland County Council; Linkoping University

Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Elwér, Å., Gustafson, S., Byrne, B., Olson, R. K., Keenan, J. M. & Samuelsson, S. (2015). A retrospective longitudinal study of cognitive and language skills in poor reading comprehension. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(2), 157-166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A retrospective longitudinal study of cognitive and language skills in poor reading comprehension
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2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 2, p. 157-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fifty-six specific poor reading comprehenders (SPRC) were selected in Grade 4 and retrospectively compared to good comprehenders at preschool (age 5) and at the end of kindergarten, Grade 1, and Grade 2. The results revealed deficits in vocabulary, grammar, verbal memory and early deficits in phonological awareness in most of the SPRC sample, beginning in preschool. The reading comprehension deficits in children with SPRC were not as marked in earlier assessments in Grade 1 and 2, probably because of the greater dependence on word decoding in reading comprehension in the early grades.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley: 24 months, 2015
Keyword
Poor comprehenders; reading comprehension; longitudinal study; preschool language skills; core deficits
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117225 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12188 (DOI)000351217500006 ()25581078 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|National Institute of Health [2 P50 HD27802, 1 R01 HD38562]; Swedish Research Council [345-2002-3701, PDOKJ028/2006:1]; Riksbankens Jubileumsfond; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation [PDOKJ028/2006:1]

Available from: 2015-04-22 Created: 2015-04-21 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Christopher, M., Hulslander, J., Byrne, B., Samuelsson, S., Keenan, J., Pennington, B., . . . Olson, R. (2015). Genetic and environmental etiologies of the longitudinal relations between prereading skills and reading. Child Development, 86(2), 342-361
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic and environmental etiologies of the longitudinal relations between prereading skills and reading
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2015 (English)In: Child Development, ISSN 0009-3920, E-ISSN 1467-8624, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 342-361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study explored the environmental and genetic etiologies of the longitudinal relations between prereading skills and reading and spelling. Twin pairs (n = 489) were assessed before kindergarten (M = 4.9 years), post-first grade (M = 7.4 years), and post-fourth grade (M = 10.4 years). Genetic influences on five prereading skills (print knowledge, rapid naming, phonological awareness, vocabulary, and verbal memory) were primarily responsible for relations with word reading and spelling. However, relations with post-fourth-grade reading comprehension were due to both genetic and shared environmental influences. Genetic and shared environmental influences that were common among the prereading variables covaried with reading and spelling, as did genetic influences unique to verbal memory (only post-fourth-grade comprehension), print knowledge, and rapid naming.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2015
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116486 (URN)10.1111/cdev.12295 (DOI)000352104000002 ()25263167 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Elwér, Å., Gustafson, S., Byrne, B., Olson, R., Keenan, J. & Samuelsson, S. (2014). A Retrospective Longitudinal Study of Cognitive and Language Skills in Poor Reading Comprehension.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Retrospective Longitudinal Study of Cognitive and Language Skills in Poor Reading Comprehension
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2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Fifty-six specific poor reading comprehenders (SPRC) were selected in grade 4 and retrospectively compared to good comprehenders at preschool age 5 and at the end of kindergarten, grade 1 and 2. The results showed a widespread language-deficit profile in children with SPRC, including deficits in vocabulary, grammar, verbal memory and early phonological awareness in a large part of the sample beginning in preschool. The reading comprehension deficits in children with SPRC were not as apparent in earlier assessments at grade 1 and 2, likely because of the greater dependence on word decoding in reading comprehension in the early grades.

Keyword
poor comprehenders, reading comprehension, longitudinal study, preschool language skills, core deficits
National Category
Educational Sciences Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110034 (URN)
Available from: 2014-09-01 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2014-09-01Bibliographically approved
Wadsby, M., Nelson, N., Ingemansson, F., Samuelsson, S. & Leijon, I. (2014). Behaviour problems and cortisol levels in very-low-birth-weight children. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 68(8), 626-632
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behaviour problems and cortisol levels in very-low-birth-weight children
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2014 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 68, no 8, p. 626-632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. There are still diverging results concerning the behaviour of children with very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) and they have been questioned to display different levels of stress hormone than normal-birth-weight (NBW) children. Aims. This study examined behaviour and the stress hormone cortisol in children with VLBW at the ages of 7 and 9 years compared with children with NBW. Results. Fifty-one VLBW and 50 NBW children were studied with the Child Behavior Checklist. Cortisol rhythm was measured through saliva samples three times a day for 2 days. VLBW children displayed more behavioural problems than NBW children, specifically social and attention problems, although still within normal ranges. They showed lower cortisol levels both at 7 and 9 years of age. No strong association between behaviour and cortisol levels was shown. Conclusion. VLBW children display more behaviour problems compared with NBW children but both groups score are within the normal range. Down-regulation of their hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function in terms of lower cortisol levels is also noted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keyword
Behaviour problems; Follow-up study; Stress hormone; Very-low-birth-weight
National Category
Clinical Medicine Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112627 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2014.907341 (DOI)000343980600015 ()24802123 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-08 Created: 2014-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Byrne, B., Samuelsson, S. & Olson, R. (2014). Dyslexia. In: Andrew Holliman (Ed.), The Routledge international companion to educational psychology: (pp. 297-306). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dyslexia
2014 (English)In: The Routledge international companion to educational psychology / [ed] Andrew Holliman, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 297-306Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2014
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111017 (URN)9780415675581 (ISBN)978-0-415-67560-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-10-03 Created: 2014-10-03 Last updated: 2014-10-16Bibliographically approved
Elwér, Å., Furnes, B., Gustafson, S. & Samuelsson, S. (2014). Pattern of Preschool Prediction of Reading Comprehension Impairment: A 10 Year Longitudinal Study.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pattern of Preschool Prediction of Reading Comprehension Impairment: A 10 Year Longitudinal Study
2014 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Compromised reading comprehension will invariably influence future academic achievements. In reading research there has been an emphasis on early identification of poor decoders to reduce future difficulties. Only a few studies have examined preschool prediction of reading comprehension impairments beyond the first grades of school, and these studies have presented different patterns of results. As studies have mostly been conducted in English; it is unclear how the results generalize to languages with transparent orthographies. In this study, a Swedish and a Norwegian twin sample were used to predict reading comprehension and decoding impairments in grade 2, 4 and 8/9 from preschool. The results suggested an important role for RAN and verbal memory. Compromised RAN was consistently associated with the poor decoders, as well as in identifying poor reading comprehenders in grade 8/9. Verbal memory tasks at preschool contributed to the identification of children with reading comprehension impairment across grades.

Keyword
Reading comprehension, reading disabilities, longitudinal study
National Category
Educational Sciences Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110035 (URN)
Available from: 2014-09-01 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2014-09-01Bibliographically approved
Byrne, B., Samuelsson, S. & Olson, R. (2014). Reading and reading acquisition in European languages. In: Heather Winskel and Prakash Padakannaya (Ed.), South and Southeast Asian psycholinguistics: (pp. 159-170). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading and reading acquisition in European languages
2014 (English)In: South and Southeast Asian psycholinguistics / [ed] Heather Winskel and Prakash Padakannaya, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014, p. 159-170Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105492 (URN)9781107017764 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-03-25 Created: 2014-03-25 Last updated: 2014-04-01
Olson, R. K., Keenan, J. M., Byrne, B. & Samuelsson, S. (2014). Why Do Children Differ in Their Development of Reading and Related Skills?. Scientific Studies of Reading, 18(1), 38-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Do Children Differ in Their Development of Reading and Related Skills?
2014 (English)In: Scientific Studies of Reading, ISSN 1088-8438, E-ISSN 1532-799X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 38-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Modern behavior-genetic studies of twins in the United States, Australia, Scandinavia, and the United Kingdom show that genes account for most of the variance in children's reading ability by the end of the 1st year of formal reading instruction. Strong genetic influence continues across the grades, though the relevant genes vary for reading words and comprehending text, and some of the genetic influence comes through a gene–environment correlation. Strong genetic influences do not diminish the importance of the environment for reading development in the population and for helping struggling readers, but they question setting the same minimal performance criterion for all children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2014
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103359 (URN)10.1080/10888438.2013.800521 (DOI)000329509300005 ()
Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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