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Leijon, Matti E.
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 11) Show all publications
Leijon, M., Arvidsson, D., Nilsen, P., Stark Ekman, D., Carlfjord, S., Andersson, A., . . . Bendtsen, P. (2011). Improvement of Physical Activity by a Kiosk-based Electronic Screening and Brief Intervention in Routine Primary Health Care: Patient-Initiated Versus Staff-Referred. Journal of medical Internet research, 13(4), e99
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvement of Physical Activity by a Kiosk-based Electronic Screening and Brief Intervention in Routine Primary Health Care: Patient-Initiated Versus Staff-Referred
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2011 (English)In: Journal of medical Internet research, ISSN 1438-8871, Vol. 13, no 4, p. e99-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Interactive behavior change technology (eg, computer programs, Internet websites, and mobile phones) may facilitate the implementation of lifestyle behavior interventions in routine primary health care. Effective, fully automated solutions not involving primary health care staff may offer low-cost support for behavior change.

OBJECTIVES: We explored the effectiveness of an electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) deployed through a stand-alone information kiosk for promoting physical activity among sedentary patients in routine primary health care. We further tested whether its effectiveness differed between patients performing the e-SBI on their own initiative and those referred to it by primary health care staff.

METHODS: The e-SBI screens for the physical activity level, motivation to change, attitudes toward performing the test, and physical characteristics and provides tailored feedback supporting behavior change. A total of 7863 patients performed the e-SBI from 2007 through 2009 in routine primary health care in Östergötland County, Sweden. Of these, 2509 were considered not sufficiently physically active, and 311 of these 2509 patients agreed to participate in an optional 3-month follow-up. These 311 patients were included in the analysis and were further divided into two groups based on whether the e-SBI was performed on the patient´s own initiative (informed by posters in the waiting room) or if the patient was referred to it by staff. A physical activity score representing the number of days being physically active was compared between baseline e-SBI and the 3-month follow-up. Based on physical activity recommendations, a score of 5 was considered the cutoff for being sufficiently physically active.

RESULTS: In all, 137 of 311 patients (44%) were sufficiently physically active at the 3-month follow-up. The proportion becoming sufficiently physically active was 16/55 (29%), 40/101 (40%), and 81/155 (52%) for patients with a physical activity score at baseline of 0, 1 to 2, and 3 to 4, respectively. The patient-initiated group and staff-referred group had similar mean physical activity scores at baseline (2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-2.3, versus 2.3, 95% CI 2.1-2.5) and at follow-up, (4.1, 95% CI 3.4-4.7, vs 4.2, 95% CI 3.7-4.8).

CONCLUSIONS: Among the sedentary patients in primary health care who participated in the follow-up, the e-SBI appeared effective at promoting short-term improvement of physical activity for about half of them. The results were similar when the e-SBI was patient-initiated or staff-referred. The e-SBI may be a low-cost complement to lifestyle behavior interventions in routine primary health care and could work as a stand-alone technique not requiring the involvment of primary health care staff.

Keywords
Computer-tailored; eHealth; lifestyle behavior; exercise; automated
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75304 (URN)10.2196/jmir.1745 (DOI)000299313300016 ()22107702 (PubMedID)
Note
funding agencies|Swedish National Institute for Public Health||Available from: 2012-02-24 Created: 2012-02-24 Last updated: 2013-09-30
Bendtsen, P., Stark Ekman, D., Johansson, A. L., Carlfjord, S., Andersson, A., Leijon, M., . . . Nilsen, P. (2011). Referral to an electronic screening and brief alcohol intervention in primary health care in Sweden: impact of staff referral to the computer. International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications, 2011, 1-11, Article ID 918763.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Referral to an electronic screening and brief alcohol intervention in primary health care in Sweden: impact of staff referral to the computer
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2011 (English)In: International Journal of Telemedicine and Applications, ISSN 1687-6415, E-ISSN 1687-6423, Vol. 2011, p. 1-11, article id 918763Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper was to evaluate whether primary health care staff's referral of patients to perform an electronic screening and brief intervention (e-SBI) for alcohol use had a greater impact on change in alcohol consumption after 3 month, compared to patients who performed the test on their own initiative. Staff-referred responders reported reduced weekly alcohol consumption with an average decrease of 8.4 grams. In contrast, self-referred responders reported an average increase in weekly alcohol consumption of 2.4 grams. Staff-referred responders reported a 49% reduction of average number of heavy episodic drinking (HED) occasions per month. The corresponding reduction for self-referred responders was 62%. The differences between staff- and self-referred patient groups in the number who moved from risky drinking to nonrisky drinking at the followup were not statistically significant. Our results indicate that standalone computers with touchscreens that provide e-SBIs for risky drinking have the same effect on drinking behaviour in both staff-referred patients and self-referred patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75303 (URN)10.1155/2011/918763 (DOI)21603024 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-02-24 Created: 2012-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Leijon, M. E., Faskunger, J., Bendtsen, P., Festin, K. & Nilsen, P. (2011). Who is not adhering to physical activity referrals, and why?. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 29(4), 234-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who is not adhering to physical activity referrals, and why?
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2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 234-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To analyse patients self-reported reasons for not adhering to physical activity referrals (PARs). Design and setting. Data on 1358 patients who did not adhere to PARs were collected at 38 primary health care (PHC) centres in Sweden. Intervention. PHC providers issued formal physical activity prescriptions for home-based activities or referrals for facility-based activities. Subjects. Ordinary PHC patients whom regular staff believed would benefit from increased physical activity. Main outcome measure: Reasons for non-adherence to PARs: "sickness", "pain", "low motivation", "no time", "economic factors", and "other". Results. Sickness and pain were the most common motives for non-adherence among older patients. The youngest patients blamed economic factors and lack of time more frequently than those in the oldest age group. Economic factors was a more common reason for non-adherence among those referred for facility-based activities compared with those prescribed home-based activities. Low motivation was a more frequent cause of non-adherence among those prescribed home-based activities compared with those referred for facility-based activities. Furthermore, lack of time was a more common reason for non-adherence among patients issued with PARs due to high blood pressure than other patients, while low motivation was a more common reason among patients issued with PARs because of a BMI of greater than 25. Conclusion. The reasons for non-adherence differ between patients prescribed home-based activities and referred for facility-based activities, as well as between patients with different specific characteristics. The information obtained may be valuable not only for the professionals working in PHC, but also for those who work to develop PARs for use in different contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2011
Keywords
Adherence; exercise; lifestyle; health promotion; prescription; primary prevention
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73320 (URN)10.3109/02813432.2011.628238 (DOI)297472200008 ()
Available from: 2012-01-03 Created: 2012-01-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Leijon, M. E., Bendtsen, P., Ståhle, A., Ekberg, K., Festin, K. & Nilsen, P. (2010). Factors associated with patients self-reported adherence to prescribed physical activity in routine primary health care. BMC Family Practice, 11(38)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with patients self-reported adherence to prescribed physical activity in routine primary health care
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2010 (English)In: BMC Family Practice, ISSN 1471-2296, E-ISSN 1471-2296, Vol. 11, no 38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Written prescriptions of physical activity, so‐called physical activity referral (PAR) schemes, have increased in popularity in recent years. Such schemes have mostly been evaluated in terms of efficacy. This study reports on a Swedish PAR scheme implemented in routine primary health care (PHC) measuring patients’ self‐reported adherence to physical activity prescriptions. The aim of this study was to evaluate adherence to physical activity prescriptions issued in everyday PHC at 3 and 12 months and to analyse the different characteristics associated with adherence to these prescriptions.

Methods: Prospective prescription data were obtained for 37 of the 42 PHC centres in Östergötland County, Sweden, during 2004. The study population consisted of 3300 patients issued PARs by ordinary PHC staff members. Odds ratios were calculated to identify the factors associated with adherence.

Results: The average adherence rate was 56% at 3 months and 50% at 12 months. In the descriptive analyses, higher adherence was associated with increased age, higher activity level at baseline, home‐based activities, prescriptions issued by professional groups other than physicians, and among patients issued PARs due to diabetes, high blood pressure and “other PAR reasons”. In the multiple logistic regression models, higher adherence was associated with higher activity level at baseline, and to prescriptions including home‐based activities, both at 3 and 12 months.

Conclusions: Prescriptions from ordinary staff in routine PHC yielded adherence in 50% of the patients in this routine care PAR scheme follow‐up. Patients’ activity level at baseline (being at least somewhat physically inactive) and being issued homebased activities were associated with higher adherence at both 3 and 12 months.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: BioMed Central, 2010
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16824 (URN)10.1186/1471-2296-11-38 (DOI)000279851800001 ()
Note

Original Publication:Matti E. Leijon, Preben Bendtsen, Agneta Stahle, Kerstin Ekberg, Karin Festin and Per Nilsen, Factors associated with patients self-reported adherence to prescribed physical activity in routine primary health care, 2010, BMC Family Practice, (11), 38.http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-11-38Licensee: BioMed Centralhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/

Available from: 2009-02-20 Created: 2009-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Leijon, M., Stark Ekman, D., Nilsen, P., Ekberg, K., Walter, L., Ståhle, A. & Bendtsen, P. (2010). Is there a demand for physical activity interventions from health care providers?: Findings from a population survey. BMC Public Health, 10(34)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there a demand for physical activity interventions from health care providers?: Findings from a population survey
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2010 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, no 34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Health care providers in many countries have delivered interventions to improve physical activity levels among their patients. Thus far, less is known about the population's interest to increase their physical activity levels and their opinion about the health care provider's role in physical activity promotion. The aims of this paper were to investigate the self-reported physical activity levels of the population and intention to increase physical activity levels, self-perceived need for support, and opinions about the responsibilities of both individuals and health care providers to promote physical activity.

Methods: A regional public health survey was mailed to 13 440 adults (aged 18-84 years) living in Östergötland County (Sweden) in 2006. The survey was part of the regular effort by the regional Health Authorities.

Results: About 25% of the population was categorised as physically active, 38% as moderately active, 27% as somewhat active, and 11% as low active. More than one-third (37%) had no intentions to increase their physical activity levels, 36% had thought about change, while 27% were determined to change. Lower intention to change was mainly associated with increased age and lower education levels. 28% answered that physical activity was the most important health-related behaviour to change "right now" and 15% of those answered that they wanted or needed support to make this change. Of respondents who might be assumed to be in greatest need of increased activity (i.e. respondents reporting poor general health, BMI>30, and inactivity) more than one-quarter wanted support to make improvements to their health. About half of the respondents who wanted support to increase their physical activity levels listed health care providers as a primary source for support.

Conclusion: These findings suggest that there is considerable need for physical activity interventions in this population. Adults feel great responsibility for their own physical activity levels, but also attribute responsibility for promoting increased physical activity to health care practitioners.

Keywords
Exercise, public health, health survey, health behaviour, lifestyle
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16816 (URN)10.1186/1471-2458-10-34 (DOI)000275405700002 ()
Note

Original Publication:Matti Leijon, Diana Stark-Ekman, Per Nilsen, Kerstin Ekberg, Lars Walter, Agneta Stahle and Preben Bendtsen, Is there a demand for physical activity interventions provided by the health care sector? Findings from a population survey, 2010, BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, (10), 34.http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-10-34Licensee: BioMed Centralhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/

Available from: 2009-02-19 Created: 2009-02-19 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Leijon, M. (2009). Activating People: Physical activity in the general population and referral schemes among primary health care patients in a Swedish county. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Activating People: Physical activity in the general population and referral schemes among primary health care patients in a Swedish county
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this thesis the need for physical activity interventions is investigated in a general adult population, the characteristics of physical activity referral (PAR) scheme recipients and referral practitioners, and the effectiveness of PAR in a routine primary health-care (PHC) setting in the county of Östergötland, Sweden. The thesis consists of four papers: three papers are based on a quantitative, uncontrolled prospective PAR study and one paper is based on a population survey in the county of Östergötland, Sweden.

In 2006, only one in four of the adult population, aged 18–84 years, in Östergötland was considered sufficiently active to meet the Swedish national public health recommendations, stated as “30 minutes of moderate physical activity a day”. More than one-third (37%) reported that they hade no intentions to change their physical activity levels, while 36% had thought about change, and 27% were determined to change. Although the individuals felt a large responsibility for their own physical activity, they also believed that this responsibility is partly shared by health-care providers. Among those who wanted to increase their physical activity level, almost one in seven of the total population and one in four among those reporting poor general health, with a BMI over 30 and those who were inactive reported that they wanted support to bring about this change. More than half of them wanted this support from their health-care provider.

During 2004 and 2005, a total of 6300 patients received PARs as part of the Östergötland PAR scheme. Two-thirds of the patients were female and half of the patients were 45–64 years old. The PAR scheme reached a relatively high proportion of physically inactive people. PARrelated statistics, including the numbers of referrals made at individual PHC centres and by different professional categories, showed large differences in prescribing activities, both by patient categories, and by prescribing professionals, indicating great potential for further improvements of this scheme in the future.

Half of the patients (51%) who received PARs were recommended home-based activities, such as walking. Patient follow-up showed that an increase in self-reported physical activity level was achieved by 52% of the patients at the 12-month follow-up. The proportion of inactive patients decreased from 33% at baseline to 20% at 12 months. The proportion of patients who were physically active on a regular basis increased from 22% at baseline to 32% at 12 months. Neither patient age, diagnosis/PAR reason nor the profession of the prescriber were associated with differences in effectiveness. Low activity levels at baseline and homebased activities were significantly associated with increased physical activity at 12 months. Half of the patients (50%) achieved adherence to PARs at the 12-month follow-up, with adherence assessed by simply asking the patients about their adherence to prescribed activity. Patients’ activity levels at baseline (being at least somewhat physically active) and being issued home-based activities were significantly associated with higher adherence at 12 months.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2009. p. 100
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 1096
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16825 (URN)978-91-7393-710-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-03-11, Aulan i Hälsans hus, ingång 16, Campus US, Linköpings Universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2009-02-20 Created: 2009-02-20 Last updated: 2017-06-30Bibliographically approved
Leijon, M. W., Hagenblad, J., Edqvist, J. & Karlsson Strese, E.-M. (2009). DNA preservation and utility of a historic seed collection. Seed Science Research, 19, 125-135
Open this publication in new window or tab >>DNA preservation and utility of a historic seed collection
2009 (English)In: Seed Science Research, ISSN 0960-2585, E-ISSN 1475-2735, Vol. 19, p. 125-135Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Historic collections of biological material are important genetic resources for taxonomic, evolutionary and historical research. In this paper we describe a seed collection dating from 1862 to 1918 maintained at the Swedish Museum of Cultural History. The collection contains over 3000 well-documented seed samples of various agricultural crops, mostly cereals. A subset of 100 samples divided over ten species frequently represented in the collection and a range of ages were tested for germinability and DNA preservation. None of these accessions were found to contain viable seeds. DNA extracted from the seeds was degraded, but the amount of degradation varied between species. DNA quality was evaluated by yield, fragment size and size of amplification product. Quality was highest for DNA extracted from Pisum sativum and Vicia sativa. DNA extracted from Brassica napus, Beta vulgaris and Trifolium pratense was more fragmented, and DNA extracted from Triticum aestivum, Secale sereale, Hordeum vulgare, Avena sativa and Phleum pratense was most degraded. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of ribosomal DNA fragments of up to 700 bp was permitted for most samples in all species. To test whether single-copy nuclear genes could be amplified from the extracted DNA, microsatellite markers were used on the Pisum sativum and Hordeum vulgare samples. Polymorphisms of microsatellite markers were detected between samples for both species. The results show that the 19th-century seed collection can be utilized to infer genetic relationships among obsolete cultivars as well as for other types of genetic research based on sequence or marker analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009
Keywords
aged seed; DNA; genebank; microsatellites; plant genetic resources; stability
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-19865 (URN)10.1017/S0960258509990055 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-08-13 Created: 2009-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Leijon, M. E., Bendtsen, P., Nilsen, P., Festin, K. & Ståhle, A. (2009). Does a physical activity referral scheme improve the physical activity among routine primary health care patients?. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 19(5), 627-636
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does a physical activity referral scheme improve the physical activity among routine primary health care patients?
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2009 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 627-636Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical activity referral (PAR) schemes or concepts occur in varying forms. Because few physical activity intervention studies have been carried out in routine health care settings, it is difficult to translate research findings into daily practice. The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of a PAR scheme implemented in routine primary health care. The study did not include a control group and was based on the ordinary staff's work efforts and follow-up measures. During a 2-year period, 6300 PARs were issued. Effectiveness was measured by an increase in self-reported physical activity. Half of the patients reached reported increased physical activity both at 3 months (49%) and at 12 months (52%). The proportion of inactive patients decreased from 33% at baseline to 17% at 3 months and 20% at 12 months. The proportion of patients who were physically active on a regular basis increased from 22% at baseline to 33% at 3 months and 32% at 12 months. Neither the patient's age nor the profession of the prescriber was associated with differences in effectiveness. The patient's activity level at baseline, the type of physical activity as well as the reason for the prescription were associated with increased physical activity.

Keywords
Exercise, prescription, lifestyle, primary prevention, health promotion, health education, interpersonal relations, health service research
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-15609 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0838.2008.00820.x (DOI)
Note
The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com: M. E. Leijon, P. Bendtsen, P. Nilsen, K. Festin, A. Ståhle, Does a physical activity referral scheme improve the physical activity among routine primary health care patients?, 2008, Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports.http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2008.00820.x. Copyright: Blackwell Publishing www.blackwell-synergy.comAvailable from: 2008-11-21 Created: 2008-11-21 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Kallings, L., Leijon, M. E., Kowalski, J., Hellenius, M.-L. & Stahle, A. (2009). Self-reported adherence: A method for evaluating prescribed physical activity in primary health care patients. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 6(4), 483-492
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported adherence: A method for evaluating prescribed physical activity in primary health care patients
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2009 (English)In: Journal of Physical Activity and Health, ISSN 1543-3080, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 483-492Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical activity on prescription, as a method for increasing physical activity, has attracted attention in recent years. However, few studies have examined adherence as a primary outcome variable. The aim of this article was to examine self-reported adherence to individualized prescribed physical activity in a routine primary health care setting. Methods: Patients receiving an individualized physical activity on prescription (FaR) for prevention or treatment of disease were recruited from 13 Swedish primary health care units. Self-reported adherence, physical activity level, readiness to change to a more physically active lifestyle, and well-being were measured with questions at baseline and after 6 months in 240 patients (mean age 51, range 12 to 80, 75% women). Results: At the 6-month follow-up a majority (65%) of the patients reported adherence to the prescription. Partial adherence was reported by 19% and nonadher- ence by 16%. There was a relationship between adherence and well-being and stages of action or maintenance. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that adherence to physical activity on prescription is as good as adherence to other treatments for chronic diseases. This is significant because even a small increase in physical activity is important both on an individual level and for public health.

Keywords
Clinical research; Exercise prescription; Health behavior; Health promotion; Intervention study; Public health
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-21276 (URN)000279664400012 ()
Available from: 2009-09-30 Created: 2009-09-30 Last updated: 2010-08-10
Leijon, M. E., Bendtsen, P., Nilsen, P., Ekberg, K. & Ståhle, A. (2008). Physical activity referrals in Swedish primary health care: prescriber and patient characteristics, reasons for prescriptions, and prescribed activities. BMC Health Services Research, 8(201)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity referrals in Swedish primary health care: prescriber and patient characteristics, reasons for prescriptions, and prescribed activities
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2008 (English)In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 8, no 201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Over the past decade, practitioners in primary health care (PHC) settings in many countries have issued written prescriptions to patients to promote increased physical activity or exercise. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse a comprehensive physical activity referral (PAR) scheme implemented in a routine PHC setting in Östergötland County. The study examines characteristics of the PARs recipients and referral practitioners, identifies reasons why practitioners opted to use PARs with their clients, and discusses prescribed activities and prescriptions in relation to PHC registries.

Methods: Prospective prescription data were obtained for 90% of the primary health care centres in Östergötland County, Sweden, in 2004 and 2005. The study population consisted of patients who were issued PARs after they were deemed likely to benefit from increased physical activity, as assessed by PHC staff.

Results: During the two-year period, a total of 6,300 patients received PARs. Two-thirds of the patients were female and half of the patients were 45–64 years. Half of the patients (50.8%) who received PARs were recommended a home-based activity, such as walking. One third (33%) of the patients issued PARs were totally inactive, reporting no days of physical activity that lasted for 30 minutes, and 29% stated that they reached this level 1–2 days per week.

The number of PARs prescribed per year in relation to the number of unique individuals that visited primary health care during one year was 1.4% in 2004 and 1.2% in 2005. Two-thirds of the combined prescriptions were issued by physicians (38%) and nurses (31%). Physiotherapists and behavioural scientists issued the highest relative number of prescriptions. The most common reasons for issuing PARs were musculoskeletal disorders (39.1%) and overweight (35.4%), followed by high blood pressure (23.3%) and diabetes (23.2%).

Conclusion: Östergötland County's PAR scheme reached a relatively high proportion of physically inactive people visiting local PHC centres for other health reasons. PAR-related statistics, including PAR-rates by individual PHC centres and PAR- rates per health professional category, show differences in prescribing activities, both by patient categories, and by prescribing professionals.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16823 (URN)10.1186/1472-6963-8-201 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-02-22 Created: 2009-02-20 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
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