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Nelson, Nina
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Publications (10 of 49) Show all publications
Ivars, K., Nelson Follin, N., Theodorsson, A., Theodorsson, E., Ström, J. & Mörelius, E. (2016). Correction: Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants. PLoS ONE, 11(3), Article ID e0151888.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction: Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 3, article id e0151888Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Cortisol concentrations in plasma display a circadian rhythm in adults and children older than one year. Earlier studies report divergent results regarding when cortisol circadian rhythm is established. The present study aims to investigate at what age infants develop a circadian rhythm, as well as the possible influences of behavioral regularity and daily life trauma on when the rhythm is established. Furthermore, we determine age-related reference intervals for cortisol concentrations in saliva during the first year of life.

METHODS:

130 healthy full-term infants were included in a prospective, longitudinal study with saliva sampling on two consecutive days, in the morning (07:30-09:30), noon (10:00-12:00) and evening (19:30-21:30), each month from birth until the infant was twelve months old. Information about development of behavioral regularity and potential exposure to trauma was obtained from the parents through the Baby Behavior Questionnaire and the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist.

RESULTS:

A significant group-level circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol secretion was established at one month, and remained throughout the first year of life, although there was considerable individual variability. No correlation was found between development of cortisol circadian rhythm and the results from either the Baby Behavior Questionnaire or the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. The study presents salivary cortisol reference intervals for infants during the first twelve months of life.

CONCLUSIONS:

Cortisol circadian rhythm in infants is already established by one month of age, earlier than previous studies have shown. The current study also provides first year age-related reference intervals for salivary cortisol levels in healthy, full-term infants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2016
National Category
Pediatrics Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127497 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0151888 (DOI)26086734 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-28 Created: 2016-04-28 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
van Vliet, J. S., Gustafsson, P. & Nelson Follin, N. (2016). Feeling ‘too fat’ rather than being ‘too fat’ increases unhealthy eating habits among adolescents – even in boys. Food & Nutrition Research, 60, Article ID 29530.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feeling ‘too fat’ rather than being ‘too fat’ increases unhealthy eating habits among adolescents – even in boys
2016 (English)In: Food & Nutrition Research, ISSN 1654-6628, E-ISSN 1654-661X, Vol. 60, article id 29530Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Adolescence is a period of gender-specific physical changes, during which eating habits develop. To better understand what factors determine unhealthy eating habits such as dieting to lose weight, skipping meals and consumption of unhealthy foods, we studied how physical measurements and body perception relate to eating habits in boys and girls, before and during adolescence.

Methods: For this cross-sectional study, we obtained data from both written questionnaires and physical measurements of height, weight and waist circumference (WC).

Results: Dieting to lose weight and skipping breakfast were more common among adolescents than among younger boys and girls (p<0.05). The strongest risk factor for dieting in both boys and girls was perception of overweight, which persisted after adjusting for age and for being overweight (p<0.01). Another independent risk factor for dieting behaviour was overweight, as defined by body mass index (BMI) among boys (p<0.01) and WC among girls (p<0.05). In both boys and girls, skipping breakfast was associated with both a more negative body perception and higher BMI (p<0.05). Skipping breakfast was also associated with age- and gender-specific unhealthy eating habits such as skipping other meals, lower consumption of fruits and vegetables, and higher consumption of sweets and sugary drinks (p<0.05).

Conclusion: Body perception among adolescents is an important factor relating to unhealthy eating habits, not only in girls, but even in boys. Focus on body perception and eating breakfast daily is crucial for the development of healthy food consumption behaviours during adolescence and tracking into adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Co-Action Publishing, 2016
Keywords
Body image, overweight, adolescent behaviour, food habits, prevention
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123852 (URN)10.3402/fnr.v60.29530 (DOI)000370126700001 ()
Note

On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Manuscript.

Funding agencies:  Erik Johan Ljungberg Educational Fund; County Council of Ostergotland; Medical Research Council of south-east Sweden [FORSS-233111]

Available from: 2016-01-11 Created: 2016-01-11 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Leijon, I., Ingemansson, F., Nelson Follin, N., Wadsby, M. & Samuelsson, S. (2016). Reading deficits in very low birthweight children are associated withvocabulary and attention issues at the age of seven. Acta Paediatrica, 105(1), 60-68
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reading deficits in very low birthweight children are associated withvocabulary and attention issues at the age of seven
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2016 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 1, p. 60-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThis Swedish study compared reading skills between seven-year-old children with a very low birthweight (VLBW) and controls with a normal birthweight, exploring associations between reading variables and cognition, parent-rated behaviour, perinatal factors and family factors. MethodsWe studied 51 VLBW children, with no major neurodevelopmental impairments and attending their first year at a regular school, and compared them with the 51 sex- and age-matched controls. The test battery, carried out at 7.80.4years of age, included reading skills, the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children - III and the Child Behaviour Checklist. ResultsVery low birthweight children with a mean birthweight of 1105g (+/- 291g) and a gestational age of 28.8 (+/- 2.2) weeks scored significantly lower in all reading subtests and cognition and demonstrated more behavioural problems than normal birthweight controls. We also found significant associations between poor vocabulary, combined with attention problems, and phonological awareness, rapid naming and spelling control. Perinatal factors had no association with reading function, and socio-economic factors had very few. ConclusionVery low birthweight children demonstrated deficits in all reading domains and had poorer cognition and more behavioural problems at the age of seven, with reading ability related to vocabulary and attention.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
Behavioural problems; Parental factors; Reading ability; School children; Very low birthweight
National Category
Clinical Medicine Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124471 (URN)10.1111/apa.13094 (DOI)000367728500022 ()26098907 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Futurum - The Academy of Health Care; Jonkoping County Council; Ostergotland County Council; Linkoping University

Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Ivars, K., Nelson Follin, N., Theodorsson, A., Theodorsson, E., Ström, J. & Mörelius, E. (2015). Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants. PLoS ONE, 10(6), Article ID e0129502.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of Salivary Cortisol Circadian Rhythm and Reference Intervals in Full-Term Infants
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2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 6, article id e0129502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Cortisol concentrations in plasma display a circadian rhythm in adults and children older than one year. Earlier studies report divergent results regarding when cortisol circadian rhythm is established. The present study aims to investigate at what age infants develop a circadian rhythm, as well as the possible influences of behavioral regularity and daily life trauma on when the rhythm is established. Furthermore, we determine age-related reference intervals for cortisol concentrations in saliva during the first year of life. Methods 130 healthy full-term infants were included in a prospective, longitudinal study with saliva sampling on two consecutive days, in the morning (07:30-09:30), noon (10:00-12:00) and evening (19:30-21:30), each month from birth until the infant was twelve months old. Information about development of behavioral regularity and potential exposure to trauma was obtained from the parents through the Baby Behavior Questionnaire and the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. Results A significant group-level circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol secretion was established at one month, and remained throughout the first year of life, although there was considerable individual variability. No correlation was found between development of cortisol circadian rhythm and the results from either the Baby Behavior Questionnaire or the Life Incidence of Traumatic Events checklist. The study presents salivary cortisol reference intervals for infants during the first twelve months of life. Conclusions Cortisol circadian rhythm in infants is already established by one month of age, earlier than previous studies have shown. The current study also provides first year age-related reference intervals for salivary cortisol levels in healthy, full-term infants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120229 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0129502 (DOI)000356567500051 ()26086734 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden, FORSS

Available from: 2015-07-21 Created: 2015-07-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
van Vliet, J. S., Gustafsson, P., Duchén, K. & Nelson Follin, N. (2015). Social inequality and age-specific gender differences in overweight and perception of overweight among Swedish children and adolescents: a cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health, 15(628)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social inequality and age-specific gender differences in overweight and perception of overweight among Swedish children and adolescents: a cross-sectional study
2015 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, no 628Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Overweight among children and adolescents related to social inequality, as well as age and gender differences, may contribute to poor self-image, thereby raising important public health concerns. This study explores social inequality in relation to overweight and perception of overweight among 263 boys and girls, age 7 to 17, in Vaxjo, Sweden. Methods: Data were obtained through a questionnaire and from physical measurements of height, weight and waist circumference [WC]. To assess social, age and gender differences in relation to overweight, the independent sample t- and chi-square tests were used, while logistic regression modeling was used to study determinants for perception of overweight. Results: Social inequality and gender differences as they relate to high ISO-BMI [Body Mass Index for children] and WC were associated with low maternal socioeconomic status [SES] among boys less than 13 years [mean age = 10.4; n = 65] and with low paternal education level among boys = 13 years [mean age = 15.0; n = 39] [p less than 0.05]. One suggested explanation for this finding is maternal impact on boys during childhood and the influence of the father as a role model for adolescent boys. The only association found among girls was between high ISO-BMI in girls = 13 years [mean age = 15.0; n = 74] and low paternal occupational status. Concerning perception of overweight, age and gender differences were found, but social inequality was not the case. Among boys and girls less than 13 years, perception of overweight increased only when overweight was actually present according to BMI or WC [p less than 0.01]. Girls = 13 years [mean age = 15.0] were more likely to unrealistically perceive themselves as overweight or "too fat," despite factual measurements to the contrary, than boys [p less than 0.05] and girls less than 13 years [mean age = 10.4; n = 83] [p less than 0.001]. Conclusions: The association between social inequality and overweight in adolescence in this study is age-and gender-specific. Gender differences, especially in perception of overweight, tend to increase with age, indicating that adolescence is a crucial period. When planning interventions to prevent overweight and obesity among children and adolescents, parental SES as well as age and gender-specific differences in social norms and perception of body weight status should be taken into account.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Social inequality; Overweight; Obesity; Perception of overweight; Childhood; Adolescence
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120339 (URN)10.1186/s12889-015-1985-x (DOI)000357559600001 ()26156095 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Erik Johan Ljungberg Educational Fund; County Council of Ostergotland; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden [FORSS-233111]

Available from: 2015-07-31 Created: 2015-07-31 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Wadsby, M., Nelson, N., Ingemansson, F., Samuelsson, S. & Leijon, I. (2014). Behaviour problems and cortisol levels in very-low-birth-weight children. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 68(8), 626-632
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behaviour problems and cortisol levels in very-low-birth-weight children
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2014 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 68, no 8, p. 626-632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. There are still diverging results concerning the behaviour of children with very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) and they have been questioned to display different levels of stress hormone than normal-birth-weight (NBW) children. Aims. This study examined behaviour and the stress hormone cortisol in children with VLBW at the ages of 7 and 9 years compared with children with NBW. Results. Fifty-one VLBW and 50 NBW children were studied with the Child Behavior Checklist. Cortisol rhythm was measured through saliva samples three times a day for 2 days. VLBW children displayed more behavioural problems than NBW children, specifically social and attention problems, although still within normal ranges. They showed lower cortisol levels both at 7 and 9 years of age. No strong association between behaviour and cortisol levels was shown. Conclusion. VLBW children display more behaviour problems compared with NBW children but both groups score are within the normal range. Down-regulation of their hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) function in terms of lower cortisol levels is also noted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
Behaviour problems; Follow-up study; Stress hormone; Very-low-birth-weight
National Category
Clinical Medicine Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112627 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2014.907341 (DOI)000343980600015 ()24802123 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-08 Created: 2014-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Allansson, E., Gustafsson, P. E., Gustafsson, P. & Nelson, N. (2014). Overweight and obese children have lower cortisol levels than normal weight children. Acta Paediatrica, 103(3), 295-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Overweight and obese children have lower cortisol levels than normal weight children
2014 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 3, p. 295-299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThe stress hormone cortisol is vital to survival, and a disturbed circadian rhythm can be deleterious to health. However, little is known about cortisol levels in healthy children. The aim of this study was to examine cortisol levels in relation to body mass index (BMI), age and sex. MethodsSalivary samples were collected in early morning, late morning and evening, on four consecutive days, from 342 children aged 6-12years using Salivette((R)) tubes. Samples were analysed using a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA). School nurses measured the childrens height and weight, and these measurements were used to calculate their BMI. ResultsThe children displayed a circadian rhythm in cortisol secretion, with morning zeniths and evening nadirs. Average cortisol levels in early morning, late morning and evening were significantly lower in overweight and obese children than in their normal weight counterparts. Cortisol levels did not vary significantly with age or sex. ConclusionOur findings may suggest cortisol suppression in overweight and obese children. We found no evidence that sex or age influences cortisol levels. These findings highlight the need for further research on the relationship between stress and obesity in children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2014
Keywords
Body mass index; child; circadian rhythm; cortisol; obesity
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105742 (URN)10.1111/apa.12499 (DOI)000331270000024 ()
Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Van Vliet, J. S., Rasanen, L., Gustafsson, P. A. & Nelson, N. (2014). Overweight perception among adolescent girls in relation to appearance of female characteristics. Paediatrics and Health, 2(1), 1-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Overweight perception among adolescent girls in relation to appearance of female characteristics
2014 (English)In: Paediatrics and Health, ISSN 2052-935X, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Overweight perception has been shown to be important for health related adolescent behavior, particularly in girls. Body perception may be affected by bodily changes, especially changes visible for others. Female pubertal development is characterized by many physical changes, such as accelerated growth and altered body fat distribution. This study examined the role of appearance of female characteristics in the risk for overweight perception among healthy adolescent girls.

Methods: 220 girls, aged 11–16, provided self-reports on body perception and pubertal maturation before anthropometric measurements of height, weight, hip and waist circumference (WC). Logistic regression modeling was used to study the appearance of pubertal characteristics in relation to body perception.

Results: Of the 76 girls (35%) perceiving themselves as overweight, only 14 and 36 girls were overweight according to body mass index and waist circumference respectively. Girls reporting breast development and acne (n=144) were more likely to perceive themselves as overweight than girls who did not report this appearance (n=76). These findings persist after adjusting for overweight according to WC. Non-overweight (n=170) rather than overweight girls reporting characteristics (n=50) were at risk of perceiving themselves overweight.

Conclusions: Girls may confuse natural changes occurring during adolescent development with being overweight. It is therefore important to improve the understanding about the physical changes that normally occur during puberty along with the girls' own perception of these bodily changes among girls themselves, their parents, at schools, and other healthcare services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Herbert Open Access Journals, 2014
Keywords
Adolescent girls, self-reports, body perception, female pubertal development, anthropometric measurements
National Category
Clinical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113130 (URN)10.7243/2052-935X-2-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-01-12 Created: 2015-01-12 Last updated: 2016-01-12
Mörelius, E., Gustafsson, P. A., Ekberg, K. & Nelson, N. (2013). Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?. Nursing Research and Practice, 2013
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neonatal Intensive Care and Child Psychiatry Inpatient Care: Do Different Working Conditions Influence Stress Levels?
2013 (English)In: Nursing Research and Practice, ISSN 2090-1429, E-ISSN 2090-1437, Vol. 2013Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction. Nurses often experience work-related stress. High stress can negatively affect job satisfaction and lead to emotional exhaustion with risk of burnout.

Aim. To analyse possible differences in biological stress markers, psychosocial working conditions,health, and well-being between nurses working in two different departments.

Methods. Stress was evaluated in nurses working in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) (𝑛 = 33) and nursesworking in a child and adolescent psychiatry inpatient ward (CAP) (𝑛 = 14) using salivary cortisol and HbA1c. Salivary cortisol was measured three times a day on two consecutive days during two one-week periods, seven weeks apart (= 12 samples/person). Psychosocial working conditions, health, and well-being were measured once.

Results. NICU nurses had better social support and more self-determination. CAP nurses had a lower salivary cortisol quotient,poorer general health, and higher client-related burnout scores.

Conclusion.When comparing these nurses with existing normdata for Sweden, as a group their scores reflect less work-related stress than Swedes overall. However, the comparison between NICU and CAP nurses indicates a less healthy work situation for CAP nurses.

Relevance to Clinical Practice. Healthcare managers need to acknowledge the less healthy work situation CAP nurses experience in order to provide optimal support and promote good health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2013
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96029 (URN)10.1155/2013/761213 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Mörelius, E., Theodorsson, E. & Nelson, N. (2013). Sample volume matters when sampling saliva in paediatric clinical analysis [Letter to the editor]. Acta Paediatrica, 102(9)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sample volume matters when sampling saliva in paediatric clinical analysis
2013 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 102, no 9Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93809 (URN)10.1111/apa.12298 (DOI)000322598300001 ()
Available from: 2013-06-10 Created: 2013-06-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06
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