liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Lemming, D., Börsbo, B., Sjörs, A., Lind, E.-B., Arendt-Nielsen, L., Graven-Nielsen, T. & Gerdle, B. (2017). Cuff Pressure Pain Detection Is Associated with Both Sex and Physical Activity Level in Nonathletic Healthy Subjects. Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), 18(8), 1573-1581
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cuff Pressure Pain Detection Is Associated with Both Sex and Physical Activity Level in Nonathletic Healthy Subjects
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Pain medicine (Malden, Mass.), ISSN 1526-2375, E-ISSN 1526-4637, Vol. 18, no 8, p. 1573-1581Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate pressure pain sensitivity on leg and arm in 98 healthy persons (50 women) using cuff algometry. Furthermore, associations with sex and physical activity level were investigated.

Method. Normal physical activity level was defined as Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire (GLTEQ) score ≤ 45 and high activity level as GLTEQ > 45. A pneumatic double-chamber cuff was placed around the arm or leg where a single chamber was inflated. The cuff inflation rate (1 kPa/s) was constant, and pain intensity was registered continuously on a 10 cm electronic visual analogue scale (VAS). The pain detection threshold (PDT) was defined as when the pressure was perceived as painful, and pain tolerance (PTT) was when the subject terminated the cuff inflation. For PTT, the corresponding VAS score was recorded (VAS-PTT). The protocol was repeated with two chambers inflated.

Result. Only single cuff results are given. For women compared with men, the PDT was lower when assessed in the arm (P = 0.002), PTTs were lower in the arm and leg (P < 0.001), and the VAS-PTT was higher in the arm and leg (P < 0.033). Highly active participants compared with less active had higher PDT (P = 0.027) in the leg. Women showed facilitated spatial summation (P < 0.014) in the arm and leg and a steeper VAS slope (i.e., the slope of the VAS pressure curve between PDT and PPT) in the arm and leg (P < 0.003).

Conclusion. This study indicates that reduced pressure pain sensitivity is associated both with male sex and physical activity level.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017
Keywords
Experimental Pain, Pain Assessment, Cuff Pressure Sensitivity, Physical Activity, Sex, Gender
National Category
Physiotherapy Sport and Fitness Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140496 (URN)10.1093/pm/pnw309 (DOI)000409845200018 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council [K2011-69X-21874-01-6]; FORTE The Swedish Research Council for Health, Working life and Welfare [2010-0913]

Available from: 2017-09-05 Created: 2017-09-05 Last updated: 2018-04-16Bibliographically approved
Hellgren, L., Samuelsson, K., Lundqvist, A. & Börsbo, B. (2015). Computerized Training of Working Memoryfor Patients with Acquired Brain Injury. Open Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 3, 46-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computerized Training of Working Memoryfor Patients with Acquired Brain Injury
2015 (English)In: Open Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, ISSN 2332-1822, Vol. 3, p. 46-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Patients with acquired brain injury often experience impaired working memory(WM), a condition that can make everyday life activities and work difficult. Objectives: This studyinvestigates the effects of computerized WM training on WM skills, cognitive tests, activity performanceand estimated health and whether the effects of computerized WM training can be attributedto sex or time since injury. Methods: Forty-eight patients with acquired brain injury underwentcomputerized WM training. Patients were tested by a neuropsychologist and interviewedby an occupational therapist just prior and 20 weeks after completion of training. Results: Patientswho participated in computerized WM training significantly improved their WM skills shown inWM index, their neuropsychological test scores, and their self-estimated health scores. They alsosignificantly improved their performance of individually defined WM-related everyday activitiesand their satisfaction with the performance of these activities. There was a significant differencein terms of WM index, WM-related daily activity performance, and satisfaction with respect to timesince injury. Conclusion: Computerized WM training can improve cognitive and everyday performancefor patients with acquired brain injury. Patients can improve their cognitive functions along time after suffering a brain injury or disease. This effect is greater if WM training is used earlyin the rehabilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2015
Keywords
Working Memory, Brain Injury, Rehabilitation, Adults
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125367 (URN)10.4236/ojtr.2015.32007 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-21 Created: 2016-02-21 Last updated: 2019-01-11
Liedberg, G., Björk, M. & Börsbo, B. (2015). Self-reported nonrestorative sleep in fibromyalgia - relationship to impairments of body functions, personal function factors, and quality of life. Journal of Pain Research, 8, 499-505
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-reported nonrestorative sleep in fibromyalgia - relationship to impairments of body functions, personal function factors, and quality of life
2015 (English)In: Journal of Pain Research, ISSN 1178-7090, E-ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 8, p. 499-505Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was: 1) to determine variables that might characterize good or bad sleep; and 2) to describe the relationship between sleep, impairment of body functions, personal function factors, and quality of life based on quality of sleep in women with fibromyalgia (FM). Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study included 224 consecutive patients diagnosed at a specialist center. These patients were mailed a questionnaire concerning sleep, body functions, personal factors, and health-related quality of life. In total, 145 completed questionnaires were collected. Results: Using sleep variables (sleep quality, waking up unrefreshed, and tiredness when getting up), we identified two subgroups - the good sleep subgroup and the bad sleep subgroup - of women with FM. These subgroups exhibited significantly different characteristics concerning pain intensity, psychological variables (depressed mood, anxiety, catastrophizing, and self-efficacy), impairments of body functions, and generic and health-related quality of life. The good sleep subgroup reported a significantly better situation, including higher employment/study rate. The bad sleep subgroup reported a greater use of sleep medication. Five variables determined inclusion into either a good sleep or a bad sleep subgroup: pain in the evening, self-efficacy, anxiety, and according to the Short Form health survey role emotional and physical functioning. Conclusion: This study found that it was possible to identify two subgroups of women with FM based on quality of sleep variables. The two subgroups differed significantly with respect to pain, psychological factors, impairments of body functions, and perceived quality of life, where the subgroup with bad sleep had a worse situation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD, 2015
Keywords
activities of daily living; chronic pain; sleep disturbance
National Category
Sociology Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123172 (URN)10.2147/JPR.S86611 (DOI)000364719900001 ()26300656 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-06 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Lemming, D., Börsbo, B., Sjörs, A., Lind, E.-B., Arendt-Nielsen, L., Graven-Nielsen, T. & Gerdle, B. (2015). Single-point but not tonic cuff pressure pain sensitivity is associated with level of physical fitness: a study of non-athletic healthy subjects. PLoS ONE, 10(5), Article ID e0125432.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Single-point but not tonic cuff pressure pain sensitivity is associated with level of physical fitness: a study of non-athletic healthy subjects
Show others...
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0125432Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exercise is often used for pain rehabilitation but the link between physical activity level and pain sensitivity is still not fully understood. Pressure pain sensitivity to cuff algometry and conditioned pain modulation (CPM) were evaluated in highly active men (n=22), normally active men (n=26), highly active women (n=27) and normally active women (n=23) based on the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire. Cuff pressure pain sensitivity was assessed at the arm and lower leg. The subjects scored the pain intensity on an electronic Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) during ten minutes with 25 kPa constant cuff pressure and two minutes with zero pressure. The maximal VAS score and area under the VAS-curve were extracted. Pressure pain thresholds (PPT) were recorded by manual pressure algometry on the ipsilateral tibialis anterior muscle before, during and after the tonic arm stimulation.

Tonic cuff stimulation of the arm and leg resulted in higher VAS peak scores in women compared with men (p<0.04). In all groups the PPTs were reduced during and after the cuff stimulation compared with baseline (p=0.001). PPT were higher in men compared with women (p=0.03) and higher in highly physical active compared with normal active (p=0.048). 

Besides the well-known gender difference in pressure pain sensitivity this study demonstrates  that a high physical fitness degree in non-athletic subjects is associated with increased pressure pain thresholds but does not affect cuff pressure pain sensitivity in healthy people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2015
Keywords
Pain assessment, Cuff algometry, Tonic muscle pressure sensitivity, Experimental pain
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-131422 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0125432 (DOI)000353887100112 ()25933412 (PubMedID)
Note

Research data for the above article to be published in Plos One.

Available from: 2014-11-04 Created: 2014-11-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Rovner, G. S., Årestedt, K., Gerdle, B., Börsbo, B. & McCracken, L. M. (2014). Psychometric properties of the 8-item Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ-8) in a Swedish Chronic pain cohort. Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, 46(1), 73-80
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric properties of the 8-item Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ-8) in a Swedish Chronic pain cohort
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 73-80Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for chronic pain has good empirical support. Pain acceptance is most often assessed with the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ). Recently a shorter 8-item version, the CPAQ-8, was developed. Objectives: To further validate the CPAQ-8 in a Swedish context and to test its sensitivity to treatment effects, an as-yet unknown property of the instrument. Methods: A total of 891 patients completed the CPAQ, along with scales for anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale), kinesiophobia (Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia) and quality of life (Short Form-36). Confirmatory factor analyses were performed to examine the factor structure. Convergent validity was tested with Pearson's correlations. Changes over time were evaluated with paired t-test. Results: The confirmatory factor analyses showed that the CPAQ 2-factor model had a better fit compared with the 1-factor model, both for the 8- and 20-item versions. All CPAQ-8 scales demonstrated good internal consistency (alpha ≥ 0.80). They also correlated significantly with related constructs, supporting convergent validity. The CPAQ-8 explained a large share of the total variance in CPAQ-20 and was also able to track rehabilitation changes (large effect size, d = 0.89). Conclusion: CPAQ-8 demonstrated good psychometric properties and sensitivity to rehabilitation changes. Further research that considers other cultural contexts may lead enhance the applications of this instrument.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stiftelsen Rehabiliteringsinformation, 2014
Keywords
thermal pain thresholds, pressure pain thresholds, thermal detection thresholds, catastrophizing, anxiety, biopsychosocial, WAD
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103736 (URN)10.2340/16501977-1227 (DOI)000330421800012 ()24036958 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-01-24 Created: 2014-01-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Bromley Milton, M., Börsbo, B., Rovner, G., Lundgren-Nilsson, Å., Stibrant-Sunnerhagen, K. & Gerdle, B. (2013). Is Pain Intensity Really That Important to Assess in Chronic Pain Patients? A Study Based on the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP). PLoS ONE, 8(6)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is Pain Intensity Really That Important to Assess in Chronic Pain Patients? A Study Based on the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP)
Show others...
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Incorporating the patient's view on care and treatment has become increasingly important for health care. Patients describe the variety of consequences of their chronic pain conditions as significant pain intensity, depression, and anxiety. We hypothesised that intensities of common symptoms in chronic pain conditions carry important information that can be used to identify clinically relevant subgroups. This study has three aims: 1) to determine the importance of different symptoms with respect to participation and ill-health; 2) to identify subgroups based on data concerning important symptoms; and 3) to determine the secondary consequences for the identified subgroups with respect to participation and health factors.

Methods and Subjects

This study is based on a cohort of patients referred to a multidisciplinary pain centre at a university hospital (n = 4645, participation rate 88%) in Sweden. The patients answered a number of questionnaires concerning symptoms, participation, and health aspects as a part of the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation (SQRP).

Results

Common symptoms (such as pain intensity, depression, and anxiety) in patients with chronic pain showed great variability across subjects and 60% of the cohort had normal values with respect to depressive and anxiety symptoms. Pain intensity more than psychological symptoms showed stronger relationships with participation and health. It was possible to identify subgroups based on pain intensity, depression, and anxiety. With respect to participation and health, high depressive symptomatology had greater negative consequences than high anxiety.

Conclusions

Common symptoms (such as pain intensity and depressive and anxiety symptoms) in chronic pain conditions carry important information that can be used to identify clinically relevant subgroups.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2013
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96714 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0065483 (DOI)000320846500011 ()23805183 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Association of Local Authorities and Regions (SALAR)||Vardal Foundation||

Available from: 2013-08-23 Created: 2013-08-23 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Larsson, B., Björk, J., Börsbo, B. & Gerdle, B. (2012). A systematic review of risk factors associated with transitioning from regional musculoskeletal pain to chronic widespread pain. European Journal of Pain, 16(8), 1084-1093
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A systematic review of risk factors associated with transitioning from regional musculoskeletal pain to chronic widespread pain
2012 (English)In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 1084-1093Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic widespread pain has limited treatment options and is associated with pronounced negative individual and socioeconomic consequences. Patients with local or regional pain may be at a risk for developing chronic widespread pain. Knowledge of such risk factors can help prevent chronic widespread pain. This study systematically reviews the literature that examines risk factors associated with developing chronic widespread after developing chronic regional pain. We conducted a three-step database search in Medline. Four articles from the authors files formed a core set of articles that were used to validate the search strategy. We conducted a systematic quality assessment of the included studies. Based on risk estimations reported in six prospective population-based studies and one retrospective study on pain, this study identified five risk factors: female sex, higher age, family history of pain, depressed mode and pain sites at baseline. As only a few studies were recovered, the impact of these factors is unclear. Spreading of pain from local or regional pain to widespread pain occurs in a large proportion of the general population. Few studies have addressed similar risk factors and the few risk factors associated with the transition from chronic regional pain to chronic widespread pain are inconsistent. Studies that focus on this transition have included few subjects and few possible risk factors. Future studies should explore more possible risk factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-81814 (URN)10.1002/j.1532-2149.2012.00117.x (DOI)000307342300009 ()
Available from: 2012-09-26 Created: 2012-09-24 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Clementz, G., Börsbo, B. & Norrbrink, C. (2012). Burnout in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders. International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, 35(4), 305-310
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Burnout in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Rehabilitation Research, ISSN 0342-5282, E-ISSN 1473-5660, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 305-310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study sought to assess burnout and its relation to pain, disability, mood and health-related quality of life in a group of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD). Forty-five patients with chronic WAD (andgt;= 3 months) referred to a multidisciplinary rehabilitation centre were included. A questionnaire covering data on background and lifestyle, the Shirom Melamed Burnout Questionnaire, pain intensity, the Neck Disability Index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and the EQ-5D was filled in before the first visit to the clinic. A high proportion of burnout as measured using the Shirom Melamed Burnout Questionnaire was found in the patient group (87%). Burnout correlated moderately with present pain intensity, neck disability, depression and health-related quality of life. The results indicate the possible clinical importance of burnout in relation to chronic WAD and the need for further studies including a larger study population and a longitudinal study design.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 2012
Keywords
anxiety, depression, disability, health-related quality of life, pain
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86372 (URN)10.1097/MRR.0b013e3283555657 (DOI)000310843500004 ()
Available from: 2012-12-14 Created: 2012-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Ahlstrand, I., Björk, M., Thyberg, I., Börsbo, B. & Falkmer, T. (2012). Pain and daily activities in Rheumatoid Arthritis. Disability and Rehabilitation, 34(15), 1245-1253
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pain and daily activities in Rheumatoid Arthritis
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 34, no 15, p. 1245-1253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this study was to describe experiences of pain and its relationship to daily activities in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Method: Seven semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with 33 men and women of different ages with RA. Data were analysed with content analysis. Results: Pain affected everyday life and may be a barrier to perform valued activities. Regarding the impact of pain on participation and independence, personal factors and the social environment were found to be important. It could be a struggle to find the right activity balance, since it was easy to be overactive, triggering subsequent elevation of pain levels. However, the participants also described activities as a mediator of pain and a distraction from it. Conclusion: The relationship between pain and daily activities in RA was complex. Pain as an impairment was expressed to be related to activity limitations and participation restrictions, as well as to contextual factors. These findings highlight the clinical importance of paying attention to the complexity of pain and its relation to daily activities and participation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74512 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2011.638034 (DOI)000304523100001 ()
Note

funding agencies|Swedish Rheumatism Association||Norrbacka-Eugenia Foundation||FORSS-Research Council of Southeast Sweden||Futurum- The Academy for Healthcare, County Council, Jonkoping||StigThunes Fund||

Available from: 2012-01-30 Created: 2012-01-30 Last updated: 2018-03-17
Börsbo, B., Liedberg, G. M., Wallin, M. & Gerdle, B. (2012). Subgroups based on thermal and pressure pain thresholds in women with chronic whiplash display differences in clinical presentation - an explorative study. Journal of pain research, 5, 511-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subgroups based on thermal and pressure pain thresholds in women with chronic whiplash display differences in clinical presentation - an explorative study
2012 (English)In: Journal of pain research, ISSN 1178-7090, Vol. 5, p. 511-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To investigate the presence of subgroups in chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD) based on pain thresholds for pressure (PPT), cold (CPT), and heat (HPT) and to compare these subgroups with respect to symptomatology, disability, and health aspects. Methods: Two groups of female subjects – patients with chronic WAD (n = 28) and healthy controls (CON; n = 29) – were investigated. Quantitative sensory testing (QST) for thermal thresholds and algometry for PPT at four sites in the body (over the trapezius and tibialis anterior bilaterally) were determined. Habitual pain intensities, psychological strain, disability, and health aspects were registered using a questionnaire.Results: A cluster analysis based on PPT, CPT, and HPT identified two subgroups of chronic WAD: one sensitive subgroup (s-WAD; n = 21), and one less sensitive subgroup (ls-WAD; n = 6). S-WAD displayed widespread hyperalgesia, whereas ls-WAD had localized hyperalgesia in the neck area, with tendencies to supernormal values in remote areas of the body. Generally, s-WAD had a significantly worse situation than the CON with respect to symptomatology, disability, and health aspects. The ls-WAD group was intermediary between s-WAD and CON in these aspects.Conclusion: Different explanations, eg, severity of the pain condition per se, etiological factors, and pre-trauma differences in pain sensitivity, may exist for the differences in pain thresholds between the two subgroups. Future research should investigate the role of pain thresholds in the chronic stage to determine the efficacy of treatment interventions.

Keywords
cold pain threshold, pain, pressure pain threshold, heat pain threshold, subgroup, whiplash, WAD
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87724 (URN)10.2147/JPR.S37062 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-01-23 Created: 2013-01-22 Last updated: 2014-12-05
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4385-428X

Search in DiVA

Show all publications