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Gerasimov, J., Karlsson, R. H., Forchheimer, R., Stavrinidou, E., Simon, D. T., Berggren, M. & Fabiano, S. (2019). An Evolvable Organic Electrochemical Transistor for Neuromorphic Applications. ADVANCED SCIENCE, 6(7), Article ID 1801339.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Evolvable Organic Electrochemical Transistor for Neuromorphic Applications
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2019 (English)In: ADVANCED SCIENCE, ISSN 2198-3844, Vol. 6, no 7, article id 1801339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An evolvable organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), operating in the hybrid accumulation-depletion mode is reported, which exhibits short-term and long-term memory functionalities. The transistor channel, formed by an electropolymerized conducting polymer, can be formed, modulated, and obliterated in situ and under operation. Enduring changes in channel conductance, analogous to long-term potentiation and depression, are attained by electropolymerization and electrochemical overoxidation of the channel material, respectively. Transient changes in channel conductance, analogous to short-term potentiation and depression, are accomplished by inducing nonequilibrium doping states within the transistor channel. By manipulating the input signal, the strength of the transistor response to a given stimulus can be modulated within a range that spans several orders of magnitude, producing behavior that is directly comparable to short- and long-term neuroplasticity. The evolvable transistor is further incorporated into a simple circuit that mimics classical conditioning. It is forecasted that OECTs that can be physically and electronically modulated under operation will bring about a new paradigm of machine learning based on evolvable organic electronics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2019
Keywords
conducting polymers; evolvable electronics; neuromorphic; organic electrochemical transistors; organic electronics
National Category
Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156560 (URN)10.1002/advs.201801339 (DOI)000463153100015 ()30989020 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061035781 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation [2012.0302]; VINNOVA [2015-04859]; Swedish Research Council [2016-03979]; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (BioCom Lab) [RIT15-0119]; Marie Sklodowska Curie Individual Fellowship (MSCA-IF-EF-ST, Trans-Plant) [702641]

Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-06-20Bibliographically approved
Berggren, M. & Malliaras, G. G. (2019). How conducting polymer electrodes operate. Science, 364(6437), 233-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How conducting polymer electrodes operate
2019 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 364, no 6437, p. 233-234Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, DC, United States: American Association for the Advancement of Science (A A A S), 2019
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157205 (URN)10.1126/science.aaw9295 (DOI)000464956600026 ()31000650 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065022317 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|KAW; SSF; VINNOVA; VR; EPSRC; EU Horizon 2020; KAUST

Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Seitanidou, M. S., Tybrandt, K., Berggren, M. & Simon, D. T. (2019). Overcoming transport limitations in miniaturized electrophoretic delivery devices. Lab on a Chip, 19(8), 1427-1435
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Overcoming transport limitations in miniaturized electrophoretic delivery devices
2019 (English)In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 1427-1435Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Organic electronic ion pumps (OEIPs) have been used for delivery of biological signaling compounds, at high spatiotemporal resolution, to a variety of biological targets. The miniaturization of this technology provides several advantages, ranging from better spatiotemporal control of delivery to reduced invasiveness for implanted OEIPs. One route to miniaturization is to develop OEIPs based on glass capillary fibers that are filled with a polyelectrolyte (cation exchange membrane, CEM). These devices can be easily inserted and brought into close proximity to targeted cells and tissues and could be considered as a starting point for other fiber-based OEIP and iontronic technologies enabling favorable implantable device geometries. While characterizing capillary OEIPs we observed deviations from the typical linear current-voltage behavior. Here we report a systematic investigation of these irregularities by performing experimental characterizations in combination with computational modelling. The cause of the observed irregularities is due to concentration polarization established at the OEIP inlet, which in turn causes electric field-enhanced water dissociation at the inlet. Water dissociation generates protons and is typically problematic for many applications. By adding an ion-selective cap that separates the inlet from the source reservoir this effect is then, to a large extent, suppressed. By increasing the surface area of the inlet with the addition of the cap, the concentration polarization is reduced which thereby allows for significantly higher delivery rates. These results demonstrate a useful approach to optimize transport and delivery of therapeutic substances at low concentrations via miniaturized electrophoretic delivery devices, thus considerably broadening the opportunities for implantable OEIP applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2019
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157204 (URN)10.1039/c9lc00038k (DOI)000465283700008 ()30875418 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85064156567 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research; Advanced Functional Materials SFO-center at Linkoping University; Onnesjo Foundation; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation

Available from: 2019-06-14 Created: 2019-06-14 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Gomez-Carretero, S., Libberton, B., Svennersten, K., Persson, K. M., Jager, E., Berggren, M., . . . Richter-Dahlfors, A. (2018). Correction: Redox-active conducting polymers modulate Salmonella biofilm formation by controlling availability of electron acceptors (vol 3, article number 19, 2017). npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, 4(1), Article ID 19.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction: Redox-active conducting polymers modulate Salmonella biofilm formation by controlling availability of electron acceptors (vol 3, article number 19, 2017)
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2018 (English)In: npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, ISSN 2055-5008, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2018
National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151743 (URN)10.1038/s41522-018-0061-6 (DOI)000452255400001 ()30109118 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85051180846 (Scopus ID)
Note

This article corrects the research article with the DOI: 10.1038/s41522-017-0027-0. The research article is registered in DiVA: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151745

Available from: 2018-10-04 Created: 2018-10-04 Last updated: 2018-12-20Bibliographically approved
Chaharsoughi, M. S., Tordera, D., Grimoldi, A., Engquist, I., Berggren, M., Fabiano, S. & Jonsson, M. (2018). Hybrid Plasmonic and Pyroelectric Harvesting of Light Fluctuations. Advanced Optical Materials
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hybrid Plasmonic and Pyroelectric Harvesting of Light Fluctuations
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2018 (English)In: Advanced Optical Materials, ISSN 2162-7568, E-ISSN 2195-1071Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

State-of-the-art solar energy harvesting systems based on photovoltaic technology require constant illumination for optimal operation. However, weather conditions and solar illumination tend to fluctuate. Here, a device is presented that extracts electrical energy from such light fluctuations. The concept combines light-induced heating of gold nanodisks (acting as plasmonic optical nanoantennas), and an organic pyroelectric copolymer film (poly(vinylidenefluoride-co-trifluoroethylene)), that converts temperature changes into electrical signals. This hybrid device can repeatedly generate current pulses, not only upon the onset of illumination, but also when illumination is blocked. Detailed characterization highlights the key role of the polarization state of the copolymer, while the copolymer thickness has minor influence on performance. The results are fully consistent with plasmon-assisted pyroelectric effects, as corroborated by combined optical and thermal simulations that match the experimental results. Owing to the tunability of plasmonic resonances, the presented concept is compatible with harvesting near infrared light while concurrently maintaining visible transparency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2018
Keywords
Gold nanodisks, Plasmonic heating, Pyroelectric copolymers, Solar energy harvesting
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148574 (URN)10.1002/adom.201701051 (DOI)000434349300001 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Wenner-Gren Foundations; Swedish Research Council [2015-05070]; Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research; AForsk Foundation; Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Lin

Available from: 2018-06-13 Created: 2018-06-13 Last updated: 2018-06-28
Gomez-Carretero, S., Libberton, B., Svennersten, K., Persson, K. M., Jager, E., Berggren, M., . . . Richter-Dahlfors, A. (2018). Redox-active conducting polymers modulate Salmonella biofilm formation by controlling availability of electron acceptors (vol 3, article number 19, 2017). npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, 3, Article ID 19.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Redox-active conducting polymers modulate Salmonella biofilm formation by controlling availability of electron acceptors (vol 3, article number 19, 2017)
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2018 (English)In: npj Biofilms and Microbiomes, ISSN 2055-5008, Vol. 3, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biofouling is a major problem caused by bacteria colonizing abiotic surfaces, such as medical devices. Biofilms are formed as the bacterial metabolism adapts to an attached growth state. We studied whether bacterial metabolism, hence biofilm formation, can be modulated in electrochemically active surfaces using the conducting conjugated polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT). We fabricated composites of PEDOT doped with either heparin, dodecyl benzene sulfonate or chloride, and identified the fabrication parameters so that the electrochemical redox state is the main distinct factor influencing biofilm growth. PEDOT surfaces fitted into a custom-designed culturing device allowed for redox switching in Salmonella cultures, leading to oxidized or reduced electrodes. Similarly large biofilm growth was found on the oxidized anodes and on conventional polyester. In contrast, biofilm was significantly decreased (52-58%) on the reduced cathodes. Quantification of electrochromism in unswitched conducting polymer surfaces revealed a bacteria-driven electrochemical reduction of PEDOT. As a result, unswitched PEDOT acquired an analogous electrochemical state to the externally reduced cathode, explaining the similarly decreased biofilm growth on reduced cathodes and unswitched surfaces. Collectively, our findings reveal two opposing effects affecting biofilm formation. While the oxidized PEDOT anode constitutes a renewable electron sink that promotes biofilm growth, reduction of PEDOT by a power source or by bacteria largely suppresses biofilm formation. Modulating bacterial metabolism using the redox state of electroactive surfaces constitutes an unexplored method with applications spanning from antifouling coatings and microbial fuel cells to the study of the role of bacterial respiration during infection.

National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151745 (URN)10.1038/s41522-017-0027-0 (DOI)000412923600001 ()28883986 (PubMedID)
Note

An author correction to this article was published with the DOI: 10.1038/s41522-018-0061-6 and is registered in DiVA: http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151743

Available from: 2018-10-04 Created: 2018-10-04 Last updated: 2018-12-20
Toss, H., Lönnqvist, S., Nilsson, D., Sawatdee, A., Nissa, J., Fabiano, S., . . . Simon, D. T. (2017). Ferroelectric Surfaces for Cell Release. Synthetic metals, 228, 99-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ferroelectric Surfaces for Cell Release
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2017 (English)In: Synthetic metals, ISSN 0379-6779, E-ISSN 1879-3290, Vol. 228, p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Adherent cells cultured in vitro must usually, at some point, be detached from the culture substrate. Presently, the most common method of achieving detachment is through enzymatic treatment which breaks the adhesion points of the cells to the surface. This comes with the drawback of deteriorating the function and viability of the cells. Other methods that have previously been proposed include detachment of the cell substrate itself, which risks contaminating the cell sample, and changing the surface energy of the substrate through thermal changes, which yields low spatial resolution and risks damaging the cells if they are sensitive to temperature changes. Here cell culture substrates, based on thin films of the ferroelectric polyvinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene (PVDF-TrFE) co-polymer, are developed for electroactive control of cell adhesion and enzyme-free detachment of cells. Fibroblasts cultured on the substrates are detached through changing the direction of polarization of the ferroelectric substrate. The method does not affect subsequent adhesion and viability of reseeded cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
National Category
Physical Sciences Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering Clinical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121804 (URN)10.1016/j.synthmet.2017.04.013 (DOI)000401599600015 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (VINNOVA) [2010-00507]; Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation; Onnesjo Foundation

Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2018-04-13Bibliographically approved
Stavrinidou, E., Gabrielsson, R., Nilsson, K. P., Singh, S. K., Franco- Gonzalez, J. F., Volkov, A. V., . . . Berggren, M. (2017). In vivo polymerization and manufacturing of wires and supercapacitors in plants. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(11), 2807-2812
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In vivo polymerization and manufacturing of wires and supercapacitors in plants
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2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 114, no 11, p. 2807-2812Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Electronic plants, e-Plants, are an organic bioelectronic platform that allows electronic interfacing with plants. Recently we have demonstrated plants with augmented electronic functionality. Using the vascular system and organs of a plant, we manufactured organic electronic devices and circuits in vivo, leveraging the internal structure and physiology of the plant as the template, and an integral part of the devices. However, this electronic functionality was only achieved in localized regions, whereas new electronic materials that could be distributed to every part of the plant would provide versatility in device and circuit fabrication and create possibilities for new device concepts. Here we report the synthesis of such a conjugated oligomer that can be distributed and form longer oligomers and polymer in every part of the xylem vascular tissue of a Rosa floribunda cutting, forming long-range conducting wires. The plant’s structure acts as a physical template, whereas the plant’s biochemical response mechanism acts as the catalyst for polymerization. In addition, the oligomer can cross through the veins and enter the apoplastic space in the leaves. Finally, using the plant’s natural architecture we manufacture supercapacitors along the stem. Our results are preludes to autonomous energy systems integrated within plants and distribute interconnected sensor-actuator systems for plant control and optimization

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Academy of Sciences, 2017
National Category
Plant Biotechnology Condensed Matter Physics Textile, Rubber and Polymeric Materials Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-135492 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1616456114 (DOI)000396094200029 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation Scholar Grant [KAW 2012.0302]; Linkoping University; Onnesjo Foundation; Wenner-Gren Foundations; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkping University [SFO-Mat-

Available from: 2017-03-16 Created: 2017-03-16 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Malti, A., Edberg, J., Granberg, H., Ullah Khan, Z., Andreasen, J. W., Liu, X., . . . Berggren, M. (2016). An Organic Mixed Ion–Electron Conductor for Power Electronics. Advanced Science, Article ID 1500305.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Organic Mixed Ion–Electron Conductor for Power Electronics
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2016 (English)In: Advanced Science, ISSN 2198-3844, article id 1500305Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A mixed ionic–electronic conductor based on nanofibrillated cellulose composited with poly(3,4-ethylene-dioxythio­phene):­poly(styrene-sulfonate) along with high boiling point solvents is demonstrated in bulky electrochemical devices. The high electronic and ionic conductivities of the resulting nanopaper are exploited in devices which exhibit record values for the charge storage capacitance (1F) in supercapacitors and transconductance (1S) in electrochemical transistors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2016
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123225 (URN)10.1002/advs.201500305 (DOI)000370336500011 ()
Note

Funding agencies:  Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation [KAW 2011.0050]; Onnesjo Foundation; Advanced Functional Materials Center at Linkoping University; Stiftelsen for strategisk forskning (SSF); RISE Research Institutes of Sweden; U.S. National Science Foundation [DMR-12

Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2018-02-15
Jonsson, A., Inal, S., Uguz, I., Williamson, A., Kergoat, L., Rivnay, J., . . . Simon, D. T. (2016). Bioelectronic neural pixel: Chemical stimulation and electrical sensing at the same site. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 113(34), 9440-9445
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bioelectronic neural pixel: Chemical stimulation and electrical sensing at the same site
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2016 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 113, no 34, p. 9440-9445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Local control of neuronal activity is central to many therapeutic strategies aiming to treat neurological disorders. Arguably, the best solution would make use of endogenous highly localized and specialized regulatory mechanisms of neuronal activity, and an ideal therapeutic technology should sense activity and deliver endogenous molecules at the same site for the most efficient feedback regulation. Here, we address this challenge with an organic electronic multifunctional device that is capable of chemical stimulation and electrical sensing at the same site, at the single-cell scale. Conducting polymer electrodes recorded epileptiform discharges induced in mouse hippocampal preparation. The inhibitory neurotransmitter, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), was then actively delivered through the recording electrodes via organic electronic ion pump technology. GABA delivery stopped epileptiform activity, recorded simultaneously and colocally. This multifunctional “neural pixel” creates a range of opportunities, including implantable therapeutic devices with automated feedback, where locally recorded signals regulate local release of specific therapeutic agents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
National Academy of Sciences, 2016
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130851 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1604231113 (DOI)000381860800035 ()27506784 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:We thank Gaelle Rondeau and the staff of the clean room in Centre Microelectronique de Provence (CMP) for technical support during fabrication. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under Grant Agreement 602102 (EPITARGET) and Initiative of Excellence Aix-Marseilles project MIDOE (A_M-AAP-ID-13-24-130531-16.31-BERNARD-HLS). Funding was also provided by the Swedish Innovation Office (2010-00507), the Swedish Research Council (621-2011-3517), and the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW Scholar, 2012.0302). The authors also thank the National Science Foundation Grant DMR-1105253 for partial support of this work, the French National Research Agency (ANR) through the project PolyProbe (ANR-13-BSV5-0019-01), Fondation pour la Recherche Medicale under Grant Agreements DBS20131128446 and ARF20150934124, Fondation de l'Avenir, the Onnesjo Foundation, the Region Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, and Microvitae Technologies. J.R. and L.K. acknowledge support from Marie Curie Fellowships. The fabrication of the device was performed, in part, at CMP.

Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-26 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5154-0291

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