liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Hollman Frisman, G., Wåhlin, I., Orwelius, L. & Ågren, S. (2018). Health-promoting conversations: A novel approach to families experiencing critical illness in the ICU environment.. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(3-4), 631-639
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-promoting conversations: A novel approach to families experiencing critical illness in the ICU environment.
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. 631-639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify and describe the outcomes of a nurse-led intervention, "Health-promoting conversations with families," regarding family functioning and well-being in families with a member who was critically ill.

BACKGROUND: Families who have a critically ill family member in an intensive care unit face a demanding situation, threatening the normal functioning of the family. Yet, there is a knowledge gap regarding family members' well-being during and after critical illness.

DESIGN: The study utilized a qualitative inductive-descriptive design.

METHODS: Eight families participated in health-promoting conversations aimed to create a context for change related to the families' identified problems and resources. Fifteen qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 adults who participated in health-promoting conversations about a critical illness in the family. Eight participants were patients (6 men, 2 women) and 10 were family members (2 male partners, 5 female partners, 1 mother, 1 daughter, 1 female grandchild). The interviews were analyzed by conventional content analysis.

RESULTS: Family members experienced strengthened togetherness, a caring attitude, and confirmation through health-promoting conversations. The caring and calming conversations were appreciated despite the reappearance of exhausting feelings. Working through the experience and being confirmed promoted family well-being.

CONCLUSION: Health-promoting conversations were considered to be healing, as the family members take part in sharing each other's feelings, thoughts, and experiences with the critical illness.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Health-promoting conversations could be a simple and effective nursing intervention for former intensive care patients and their families in any cultural context. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
Critical illness, family, family support, health, intensive care
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140008 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13969 (DOI)000425733600036 ()28722814 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85042260389 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); Anesthetics, Operations, and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery Center; Department of Intensive Care, Clinical Experimental Medicine, County Council of Ostergotland, Linkoping

Available from: 2017-08-25 Created: 2017-08-25 Last updated: 2018-03-20Bibliographically approved
Pihl Lesnovska, K., Hollman Frisman, G., Hjortswang, H. & Börjeson, S. (2016). Critical situations in daily life as experienced by patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Gastroenterology Nursing, 39(3), 195-203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical situations in daily life as experienced by patients with inflammatory bowel disease
2016 (English)In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 195-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic and have a fluctuating clinical course that impacts daily life. Daily life with a chronic disease involves thinking and worrying about the limitations that chronic disease causes. Knowledge about how patients who suffer from IBD manage critical incidents in daily life is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe how patients living with IBD experience critical incidents in daily life in relation to their disease and symptoms. Thirty adult patients were interviewed focusing on critical incidents in daily life. Data were analyzed using the critical incident technique. The study comprised 224 critical incidents and was grouped into 21 subcategories and 5 categories: losing bowel control, having a body that smells, being unable to meet own and others' expectations, not being believed or seen, and experiencing frustration due to side effects and ineffective treatment. These categories formed one main area describing the overall result "The bowels rule life." The uncertain nature of IBD created critical incidents in which the bowel ruled life, causing patients to avoid social interaction. It also placed considerable demands on the family and sometimes had a negative effect on the afflicted person's career.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126621 (URN)10.1097/SGA.0000000000000211 (DOI)000380804500004 ()26870902 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: We acknowledge funding from the County Council of Ostergotland.

Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2017-11-01Bibliographically approved
Lovén Wickman, U., Yngman Uhlin, P., Hjortswang, H., Riegel, B., Stjernman, H. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2016). Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An interview study. Gastroenterology Nursing, 39(2), 121-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An interview study
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25-66 years of age, were interviewed. Data were analyzed by performing a qualitative content analysis. Four categories with 10 subcategories emerged from the analysis of the interviews. The self-care patients perform consists of symptom recognition (subcategories: physiological sensations and psychological sensations), handling of symptoms (subcategories: adapting the diet, using medical treatment, stress management, and using complementary alternative medicine), planning life (subcategories: planning for when to do activities and when to refrain from activities), and seeking new options (subcategories: seeking knowledge and personal contacts). Self-care consists of symptom recognition, handling life through planning, and accommodating the existing situation with the ultimate goal of maintaining well-being. Being one step ahead facilitates living with IBD. A decision to actively participate in care of a chronic illness is a prerequisite for self-care. Healthcare professionals must consider patients' potential for and desire for self-care when giving advice on self-care activities. Doing so may help people better cope with IBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126617 (URN)10.1097/SGA.0000000000000120 (DOI)000377983500007 ()26166423 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden-FORSS; County Council of Kalmar; Florence Nightingale Foundation; Ruth and Richard Juhlins foundation

Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2017-05-03Bibliographically approved
Lovén Wickman, U., Riegel, B., Yngman Uhlin, P., Hjortswang, H. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2016). Self-care of inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with better well-being. In: : . Paper presented at 11th Congress of ECCO - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, MArch 16-19, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care of inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with better well-being
Show others...
2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126623 (URN)
Conference
11th Congress of ECCO - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, MArch 16-19, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2018-03-23
Bäckman, C., Ahlberg, M., Jones, C., Walther, S. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2015). Group Communication during recovery after intensive care. In: : . Paper presented at 6th European Federation of Critical Care Nursing associations Congress, Valencia, Spain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Group Communication during recovery after intensive care
Show others...
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115855 (URN)
Conference
6th European Federation of Critical Care Nursing associations Congress, Valencia, Spain
Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-20 Last updated: 2015-04-07
Ahlberg, M., Bäckman, C., Jones, C., walther, S. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2015). Moving forward in life after being an unlocker in intensive care - partners' experience of group communication. In: : . Paper presented at 6th European Federation of Critical Care Nursing Associations Congress, January 29-31, Valencia, Spain.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moving forward in life after being an unlocker in intensive care - partners' experience of group communication
Show others...
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115853 (URN)
Conference
6th European Federation of Critical Care Nursing Associations Congress, January 29-31, Valencia, Spain
Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-20 Last updated: 2015-10-15
Ahlberg, M., Bäckman, C., Jones, C., Walther, S. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2015). Moving on in life after intensive care - partners' experience of group communication. Nursing in Critical Care, 20(5), 256-263
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moving on in life after intensive care - partners' experience of group communication
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Nursing in Critical Care, ISSN 1362-1017, E-ISSN 1478-5153, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 256-263Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:Partners have a burdensome time during and after their partners’ intensive care period. They may appear to be coping welloutwardly but inside feel vulnerable and lost. Evaluated interventions for partners on this aspect are limited.

Aim:The aim of this study was to describe the experience of participating in group communication with other partners of former intensivecare patients.

Design:The study has a descriptive intervention-based design where group communication for partners of former, surviving intensive careunit (ICU) patients was evaluated.

Methods:A strategic selection was made of adult partners to former adult intensive care patients (n=15), 5 men and 10 women, aged37–89 years. Two group communication sessions lasting 2 h were held at monthly intervals with three to five partners. The partners later wrote,in a notebook, about their feelings of participating in group communications. To deepen the understanding of the impact of the sessions, six ofthe partners were interviewed. Content analysis was used to analyse the notebooks and the interviews.

Findings:Three categories were identified: (1) Emotional impact, the partners felt togetherness and experienced worries and gratitude, (2)Confirmation, consciousness through insight and reflection and (3) The meeting design, group constellation and recommendation to participatein group communication.

Conclusion:Partners of an intensive care patient are on a journey, constantly trying to adapt to the new situation and find new strategiesto ever-changing circumstances. Group communications contributed to togetherness and confirmation. To share experiences with others is oneway for partners to be able to move forward in life.

Relevance to clinical practice:Group communication with other patients’ partners eases the process of going through the burden ofbeing a partner to an intensive care patient. Group communications needs to be further developed and evaluated to obtain consensus andevidence for the best practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
Communication, content analysis, intensive care, nursing, partners
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119295 (URN)10.1111/nicc.12192 (DOI)000359901900006 ()26032101 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-12 Created: 2015-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Wallström, Å. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2014). Facilitating early recovery of bowel motility after colorectal surgery: a systematic review. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23(1-2), 24-44
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Facilitating early recovery of bowel motility after colorectal surgery: a systematic review
2014 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 1-2, p. 24-44Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

To determine how restored gastrointestinal motility can be accelerated after colorectal surgery.

BACKGROUND:

Regaining normal bowel functions after surgery is described as unexpectedly problematic. Postoperative ileus is expected after all surgery where the peritoneum is entered, and the length of surgery has little or no impact in terms of the duration of Postoperative ileus. There is some speculation about the best way to facilitate bowel motility after colorectal surgery.

DESIGN:

A systematic review.

METHOD:

The computerised databases Medline, Scopus and CINAHL were searched to locate randomised, controlled trials by using the following keywords: colorectal surgery, postoperative ileus, recovery of function and gastrointestinal motility. The systematic search was limited to studies published between January 2002-January 2012. Reference lists were also searched manually.

RESULTS:

A total of 34 randomised, controlled trials were included in the review. Recovery of gastrointestinal motility was accelerated when one of the following forms of treatment was administered: probiotics, early feeding in combination with multimodal regimens, pentoxifylline, flurbiprofen, valdecoxib, ketorolac, clonidine, ropivacaine, lidocaine or spinal analgesia. Gum chewing, preoperative carbohydrate loading, bisacodyl and Doppler-guided fluid management have an uncertain effect on bowel motility. The use of nonpharmacological interventions, intrathecal morphine, restricted fluid therapy and choline citrate yielded no significant acceleration in bowel motility.

CONCLUSIONS:

A multimodal treatment, where the use of morphine is restricted, seems to be the best way to accelerate the recovery of gastrointestinal bowel motility. However, more studies are required to optimise the multimodal protocol.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

The early return of bowel functions leads to quicker overall postoperative recovery, which may ease patient discomfort and decrease hospitalisation costs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
colorectal surgery, enhanced recovery, gastrointestinal motility, multimodal treatment, postoperative care
National Category
Clinical Medicine Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102971 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12258 (DOI)000327883400004 ()23786567 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Ahlberg, M., Bäckman, C., Jones, C., Walther, S. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2014). Group communication confirm feelings among partners of former intensive care patients. In: : . Paper presented at National Congress for ICU nurses in Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Group communication confirm feelings among partners of former intensive care patients
Show others...
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115849 (URN)
Conference
National Congress for ICU nurses in Sweden
Available from: 2015-03-20 Created: 2015-03-20 Last updated: 2015-04-07
Ahlberg, M., Bäckman, C., Jones, C., Walther, S. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2014). Group communication confirms feelings among partners of former intensive care patients. In: : . Paper presented at National congress for ICU-nurses in Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Group communication confirms feelings among partners of former intensive care patients
Show others...
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130535 (URN)
Conference
National congress for ICU-nurses in Sweden
Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-15 Last updated: 2016-08-22
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications