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Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
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Publications (10 of 180) Show all publications
Dahlgren, L.-O. & Johansson, K. (2015). Fenomenografi (2ed.). In: Andreas Fejes & Robert Thornberg (Ed.), Handbok i kvalitativ analys: (pp. 162-175). Stockholm: Liber
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fenomenografi
2015 (Swedish)In: Handbok i kvalitativ analys / [ed] Andreas Fejes & Robert Thornberg, Stockholm: Liber, 2015, 2, p. 162-175Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Liber, 2015 Edition: 2
Keywords
Forskningsmetodik
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113799 (URN)978-91-47-11165-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-30 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Mbabazi, P., Fejes, A. & Dahlgren, L.-O. (2013). A phenomenographic study of students' conceptions of quality in learning in higher education in Rwanda. Studies in Continuing Education, 35(3), 337-350
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A phenomenographic study of students' conceptions of quality in learning in higher education in Rwanda
2013 (English)In: Studies in Continuing Education, ISSN 0158-037X, E-ISSN 1470-126X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 337-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to understand the different ways that university students conceptualise quality in learning by drawing on a phenomenographic approach. A total of 20 students in higher education in Rwanda were interviewed and analysis of the interviews generated an outcome space of conceptions of quality in learning as transformation, practice, knowledge durability and employability. The findings illustrate the importance of the relationship between education and work as an important aspect of conceptions of quality in learning. This relationship connects to the discourse of employability in which graduates are expected to become flexible and adaptable to changes in context and over the course of time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2013
Keywords
Quality in learning, phenomenography, higher education
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87127 (URN)10.1080/0158037X.2013.768229 (DOI)000326350300006 ()
Available from: 2013-01-10 Created: 2013-01-10 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Wilhelmsson, N., Dahlgren, L. O., Hult, H., Wirell, S., Ledin, T. & Josephson, A. (2013). Phenomenographic study of basic science understanding-senior medical students' conceptions of fatigue. Education for Health, 26(3), 156-163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phenomenographic study of basic science understanding-senior medical students' conceptions of fatigue
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2013 (English)In: Education for Health, ISSN 1357-6283, E-ISSN 1469-5804, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 156-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Helping students learn to apply their newly learned basic science knowledge to clinical situations is a long-standing challenge for medical educators. This study aims to describe how medical students' knowledge of the basic sciences is construed toward the end of their medical curriculum, focusing on how senior medical students explain the physiology of a given scenario. Methods A group of final-year medical students from two universities was investigated. Interviews were performed and phenomenographic analysis was used to interpret students' understanding of the physiology underlying the onset of fatigue in an individual on an exercise bicycle.

RESULTS: Three categories of description depict the qualitatively different ways the students conceptualized fatigue. A first category depicts well integrated physiological and bio-chemical knowledge characterized by equilibrium and causality. The second category contains conceptions of finite amount of substrate and juxtaposition of physiological concepts that are not fully integrated. The third category exhibits a fragmented understanding of disparate sections of knowledge without integration of basic science and clinical knowledge.

DISCUSSION: Distinctive conceptions of fatigue based with varying completeness of students' understanding characterized the three identified categories. The students' conceptions of fatigue were based on varying understanding of how organ systems relate and of the thresholds that determine physiological processes. Medical instruction should focus on making governing steps in biological processes clear and providing opportunity for causal explanations of clinical scenarios containing bio-chemical as well as clinical knowledge. This augments earlier findings by adding descriptions in terms of the subject matter studied about how basic science is applied by students in clinical settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
The Network:Towards Unity for Health, 2013
Keywords
Phenomenography, problem-based learning, qualitative methodology, student learning, undergraduate medical education
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110130 (URN)10.4103/1357-6283.125990 (DOI)25001348 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-09-03 Created: 2014-09-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Wilhelmsson, M., Pelling, S., Uhlin, L., Dahlgren, L.-O., Faresjö, T. & Forslund, K. (2012). How to think about interprofessional competence: A metacognitive model. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 26(2), 85-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to think about interprofessional competence: A metacognitive model
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Interprofessional Care, ISSN 1356-1820, E-ISSN 1469-9567, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 85-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Different professions meet and work together in teams every day in health and social care. To identify and deliver the best quality of care for the patient, teamwork should be both professionally and interprofessionally competent. How can enhanced education prepare teamworkers to be both professionally and interprofessionally competent? To achieve interprofessional skills and design effective interprofessional curricula, there is a need for metacognitive frameworks focusing on the relationship between theories and the problem-solving process as well as the structure and content of professional competence. The aim of this article is to discuss the need for shared metacognitive structures/models as a tool for securing successful interprofessional learning and developing personal, professional and interprofessional competence to improve the quality of care. A metacognitive model for interprofessional education and practice is presented in this article. This model has been developed as a tool for analyzing professional competence on three levels: individual, team and organization. The model comprises seven basic components of professional competence and the way they are related and interact. Examples of how this metacognitive model can be used in the early, middle and late stages in interprofessional education are given.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2012
Keywords
Collaborative competence, interprofessional education, qualitative method, shared problem-solving
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75898 (URN)10.3109/13561820.2011.644644 (DOI)000300680100003 ()
Note
Funding Agencies|Faculty of Health Sciences at Linkoping University, Sweden||Available from: 2012-03-16 Created: 2012-03-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Edelbring, S., Broström, O., Henriksson, P., Vassiliou, D., Spaak, J., Dahlgren, L.-O., . . . Zary, N. (2012). Integrating virtual patients into courses: follow-up seminars and perceived benefit. Medical Education, 46(4), 417-425
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating virtual patients into courses: follow-up seminars and perceived benefit
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2012 (English)In: Medical Education, ISSN 0308-0110, E-ISSN 1365-2923, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 417-425Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

CONTEXT The use of virtual patients (VPs) suggests promising effects on student learning. However, currently empirical data on how best to use VPs in practice are scarce. More knowledge is needed regarding aspects of integrating VPs into a course, of which student acceptance is one key issue. Several authors call for looking beyond technology to see VPs in relation to the course context. The follow-up seminar is proposed as an important aspect of integration that warrants investigation. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS A cross-sectional explanatory study was performed in a clinical clerkship introduction course at four teaching hospitals affiliated to the same medical faculty. The VP-related activities were planned collaboratively by teachers from all four settings. However, each setting employed a different strategy to follow up the activity in the course. Sixteen questionnaire items were grouped into three scales pertaining to: perceived benefit of VPs; wish for more guidance on using VPs, and wish for assessment and feedback on VPs. Scale scores were compared across the four settings, which were ranked according to the level of intensity of students processing of cases during VP follow- up activities. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS The perceived benefit of VPs and their usage were higher in the two intense-use settings compared with the moderate-and lowintensity settings. The wish for more guidance was high in the low-and one of the highintensity settings. Students in all settings displayed little interest in more assessment and feedback regarding VPs. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS High case processing intensity was related to positive perceptions of the benefit of VPs. However, the low interest in more assessment and feedback on the use of VPs indicates the need to clearly communicate the added value of the follow-up seminar. The findings suggest that a more intense follow-up pays off in terms of the benefit perceived by students. This study illustrates the need to consider VPs from the perspective of a holistic

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2012
National Category
Pedagogical Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76522 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2923.2012.04219.x (DOI)000301570300013 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|EC||

Available from: 2012-04-12 Created: 2012-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Abrandt Dahlgren, M., Dahlgren, L. O. & Dahlberg, J. (2012). Learning professional practice through education (1ed.). In: Paul Hager, Ann Reich & Alison Lee (Ed.), Practice, Learning and Change: Practice-theory perspectives on professional learning.. Dordrecht: Springer Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning professional practice through education
2012 (English)In: Practice, Learning and Change: Practice-theory perspectives on professional learning. / [ed] Paul Hager, Ann Reich & Alison Lee, Dordrecht: Springer Publishing Company, 2012, 1Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The three concepts central to this volume--practice, learning and change--have received very different treatments in the educational literature, an oversight directly confronted here. While learning and change have been extensively theorised, their various contexts articulated and analysed, practice is notably underrepresented. Where much of the literature on learning and change takes the notion of 'practice' as an unexamined given, its co-location as a term with various classifiers, as in 'legal practice' and 'teaching practice', render it curiously devoid of semantic force. In this book, 'practice' is the super-ordinate organising idea. Drawing on what has been termed the 'practice turn in contemporary theory', the work develops a conceptual framework for researching learning in, and on, practice. It challenges received notions of practice, questioning the assumptions, elisions, conflations and silences on the subject. In so doing, it offers fresh insights into learning and change, and how they relate to practice. In tandem with this conceptual work, the book details site-ontological studies of practice and learning in diverse professional and workplace contexts, examining the work of occupations as various as doctors, chefs and orchestral musicians. It demonstrates the value of theorising practice, learning and change, as well as exploring the connections between them amid our evolving social and institutional structures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dordrecht: Springer Publishing Company, 2012 Edition: 1
Keywords
Education, Education, Higher, Adult education, Professional & Vocational Education, Lifelong Learning/Adult Education
National Category
Social Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78112 (URN)978-9-4007-4773-9 (ISBN)
Note

Boken utges 31 juli 2012

Available from: 2012-06-07 Created: 2012-06-07 Last updated: 2014-11-12Bibliographically approved
Gillsjö, C., Schwartz-Barcott, D., Bergh, I. & Dahlgren, L. O. (2012). Older Adults Ways of Dealing With Daily Life While Living With Long-Term Musculoskeletal Pain at Home. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 31(5), 685-705
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Older Adults Ways of Dealing With Daily Life While Living With Long-Term Musculoskeletal Pain at Home
2012 (English)In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, E-ISSN 1552-4523, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 685-705Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Long-term musculoskeletal pain is a global health problem among older adults. Yet little is known about how these older adults actually deal with daily life. This studys aim is to describe the ways these older adults dealt with daily life at home. Phenomenography is used to collect and analyze data from semistructured interviews with 19 older adults and to identify the range in which they dealt with daily life. Findings consist of an outcome space that encompassed four categories: ignore, struggle, adjust, and resign. The different ways older adults dealt with daily life when living with long-term pain at home strengthen the importance of individualized plans of care in the home and a holistic perspective. Findings contribute to enhanced understanding of a common health problem among older adults that can be used to promote quality of care and improve the quality of life of older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE Publications (UK and US), 2012
Keywords
phenomenography, long-term pain, older adults, musculoskeletal pain, qualitative research
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84331 (URN)10.1177/0733464810397540 (DOI)000308412400006 ()
Available from: 2012-10-05 Created: 2012-10-05 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Ahldén, I., Alehagen, S., Dahlgren, L. O. & Josefsson, A. (2012). Parents' Expectations About Participating in Antenatal Parenthood Education Classes. The Journal of Perinatal Education, 21(1), 11-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents' Expectations About Participating in Antenatal Parenthood Education Classes
2012 (English)In: The Journal of Perinatal Education, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 11-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Our objective was to assess parents' expectations about participating in antenatal parenthood education classes and to determine whether their expectations might be related to gender, age, and educational level. Data from 1,117 women and 1,019 partners residing in three cities in Sweden were collected with a questionnaire in a cross-sectional study. Participants believed that antenatal education classes would help them to feel more secure as parents and to be better oriented toward childbirth. Men had more positive expectations about the childbirth than the women. The participants mostly wanted help in preparing for parenthood and in learning infant care skills, followed by help in preparing for childbirth. The participants' expectations were affected by gender, age, and educational level. The expectant parents appeared to want more focus on preparation for parenthood than on childbirth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2012
Keywords
antenatal parenthood education classes; antenatal programs; prospective parents' expectations
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74515 (URN)10.1891/1058-1243.21.1.11 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-01-30 Created: 2012-01-30 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Mbabazi, P., Dahlgren, L. O. & Fejes, A. (2012). Students as learners through the eyes of their teachers in Rwandan higher education. International Journal of Lifelong Education, 31(4), 503-521
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students as learners through the eyes of their teachers in Rwandan higher education
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Lifelong Education, ISSN 0260-1370, E-ISSN 1464-519X, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 503-521Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we aim to explore and thematically analyze higher education teachers’ notions about the most important problems related to students’ learning, including the teachers’ notions of the approaches to learning that the students adopt. The study was carried out in Rwanda with 25 university teachers engaged in group interviews. Inspired by the concepts of metaphors for learning and approaches to learning, five main categories of students’ learning problems were identified: dependence, physical and economic resources, experience of a deep approach to learning, reading culture, and previous preparation for higher education. These problems are interrelated and point to the need to understand study levels in education systems as being interdependent. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis, 2012
Keywords
student learning; approaches to learning; quality in learning; higher education in Rwanda
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76553 (URN)10.1080/02601370.2012.689377 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-04-11 Created: 2012-04-11 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Stenfors-Hayes, T., Hult, H. & Dahlgren, L.-O. (2012). Three ways of understanding development as a teacher. European journal of dental education, 16(1), e151-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three ways of understanding development as a teacher
2012 (English)In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 16, no 1, p. e151-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The demands on faculty in terms of teaching are increasing, but until recently there has been little discussion of how faculty perceive that development as a teacher can be achieved or what approaches they use or suggest themselves. The aim of this study is to explore how teachers in dentistry and medicine understand development as teachers. For this study, 20 teachers were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Three different ways of understanding development were identified: 1) Development as a dental or medical clinician/expert as the teacher role is seen as a tacit part of the role of the clinician. 2) Experience and professional and personal maturation, related to personal and professional development and confidence in ones clinical role. 3) Knowledge in education and systematic teacher training as in this category, being a teacher is seen as a separate role from that of being a clinician. The differences in these three ways of understanding development as a teacher are shown in their different aims of development, what kind of knowledge that may be used and what methods they suggested. The way teachers understand what it means to develop as a teacher will affect their motivation for engaging in development activities, which activities they choose and their own aims of development. This means that awareness of teachers understanding of development is central when developing support or faculty development activities for teachers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74182 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0579.2011.00690.x (DOI)
Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-08
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