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Hansen, Peo, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0497-473X
Publications (10 of 87) Show all publications
Hansen, P. (2018). Asylum or Austerity?: The "Refugee Crisis" and the Keynesian Interlude. European Political Science, 17(1), 128-139
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asylum or Austerity?: The "Refugee Crisis" and the Keynesian Interlude
2018 (English)In: European Political Science, ISSN 1680-4333, E-ISSN 1682-0983, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 128-139Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2018
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-139509 (URN)10.1057/s41304-017-0122-y (DOI)000429383500009 ()2-s2.0-85023194560 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-07 Created: 2017-08-07 Last updated: 2018-04-26Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, S. & Hansen, P. (2018). Eurafrica: History of European Integration, ‘Compromise’ of Decolonization. Europe Now. A Journal of Research and Art (online) (15)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eurafrica: History of European Integration, ‘Compromise’ of Decolonization
2018 (English)In: Europe Now. A Journal of Research and Art (online), no 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relationship between the history of European integration and the history of colonialism is best understood through a compelling geopolitical entity once known as Eurafrica. As we have shown in a recent book by that title, most efforts to unify Europe from 1920 to 1960 systematically coincided with efforts to develop and stabilize the colonial system in Africa. Eurafrica was also the name of the “compromise” of decolonization. It was the mediating institutional formation through which Africa and Europe exited the colonial era and entered a new world order where, just as the founders of the EEC had intended, their unequal relationship essentially remained unchanged. Today, even as the Eurafrican project is largely forgotten, the content of current EU policymaking towards its African “partner” demonstrates that its influence persists under the surface. The only way to comprehend the deep structures of current EU–African relations is to bring this history to life again, or at least bring it into the history books.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Council of European Studies/Columbia University, 2018
Keywords
Europeisk integration, Europeiska unionen, kolonialism, Afrika, migration
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations History Globalisation Studies Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148045 (URN)
Note

EuropeNow is an online monthly journal, with a blog that publishes weekly. It features research, criticism, and journalism on Europe alongside literary nonfiction, fiction, poetry, translations, and visual art from or concerning Europe. EuropeNow‘s contributors are established and emerging academics, artists, authors, and journalists from a wide range of countries, while the editorial staff and committee similarly consist of both experienced and emerging editors. EuropeNow is published by the Council for European Studies (CES) at Columbia University, a non-profit organization that recognizes outstanding, multi-disciplinary research on Europe through a wide range of programs and initiatives.

Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-06-05Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, S. & Hansen, P. (2018). European Integration as a Colonial Project (1ed.). In: Olivia U. Rutazibwa and Robbie Shilliam (Ed.), Routledge Handbook of Postcolonial Politics: (pp. 32-47). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>European Integration as a Colonial Project
2018 (English)In: Routledge Handbook of Postcolonial Politics / [ed] Olivia U. Rutazibwa and Robbie Shilliam, London: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 32-47Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

For a long time, studies of colonialism and imperialism focused primarily on once colonised societies where the traces and consequences of colonialism lay immediately open to anyone’s experience. In recent decades, and much due to postcolonial scholarship, which has disclosed that colonising societies were just as much influenced by colonialism as the colonised ones, there has also emerged an impressive body of research that traces colonialism’s influence on the national cultures and histories of a number of European states, and not just those that had explicit colonial ambitions. This research testifies to the fact that colonialism lingers on as a touchy and salient issue in national imaginaries and cultural identities, as well as in national high politics. Meanwhile, the urgency of a series of contemporary developments and projects should challenge research also to go beyond the methodological nationalism or, better, methodological colonial statism often inherent in such studies.In this chapter we attend to the ‘the European project’, or more specifically the project of European integration. Challenging received ideas in scholarship, we suggest a new point of departure for the analysis of the relation between Europe and Africa in the interwar and postwar eras. By demonstrating that the early European integration that culminated in the Treaty of Rome in 1957 in fact was a colonial enterprise that incorporated all the member states’ colonies within its institutional framework, we also point to the crucial implications that this has had for postcolonial relations between what is today the European Union and the former colonies in Africa.In reconceiving historical European integration as a colonial project, we also discuss the implications of this for contemporary conceptions of European integration. Provided that European integration in the postwar period to a large extent revolved around matters of trade, the EEC being a ‘customs union’, our intuition should tell us that such a project ought to have been deeply concerned with colonial affairs, particularly because the future of the French empire and its trading bloc seemed to hinge on France’s ability to preserve and consolidate its colonial economy. It should be equally safe to assume that the general political and geopolitical situation of the latter part of the 1940s and the 1950s, so profoundly marked by colonial crises and colonial wars, should have left a strong imprint on the various initiatives to bolster postwar Western European cooperation. To imagine that these circumstances did not affect European integration would be as counterintuitive as to imagine European integration to have been unaffected by the Cold War. Yet, this is how things are portrayed in just about all of today’s standard histories of European integration (see further Hansen and Jonsson 2014a). As a third and final task, then, the chapter seeks to clarify this puzzle and lacuna, focusing, inter alia, on the need to rethink the concepts and remodel the interpretive frames within which the history of European integration traditionally has been understood and explained.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2018 Edition: 1
Series
Routledge Handbooks
Keywords
Postcolonial Africa, Postcolonial Europe, Colonialism, European Integration, Eurafrica, International relations, Europe, Africa
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Globalisation Studies Cultural Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-148048 (URN)9781138944596 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Hansen, P. (2017). 'EU Migration Crises in Times of Fiscal Austerity'. In: Wolfram Hilz & Daniele Saracino (Ed.), Nordic Perspectives on the European Asylum System: The Cases of Sweden and Finland (pp. 85-98). Baden-Baden: Tectum Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'EU Migration Crises in Times of Fiscal Austerity'
2017 (English)In: Nordic Perspectives on the European Asylum System: The Cases of Sweden and Finland / [ed] Wolfram Hilz & Daniele Saracino, Baden-Baden: Tectum Verlag , 2017, p. 85-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Baden-Baden: Tectum Verlag, 2017
Series
Bonner Studien zum globalen Wandel, ISSN 1869-7186 ; 23
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141087 (URN)978-3-8288-3998-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-09-21 Created: 2017-09-21 Last updated: 2017-09-28Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, S. & Hansen, P. (2017). Eurafrica Incognita: The Colonial Origins of the European Union. History of the Present, 7(1), 1-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eurafrica Incognita: The Colonial Origins of the European Union
2017 (English)In: History of the Present, ISSN 2159-9785, E-ISSN 2159-9793, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Illinois Press, 2017
Keywords
European studies, European integration, Afro-European relations, Eurafrica, Colonialism, Imperialism
National Category
History of Ideas International Migration and Ethnic Relations History Globalisation Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127025 (URN)10.5406/historypresent.7.1.0001 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-04-12 Created: 2016-04-12 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved
Hansen, P. (2016). The European Union's External Labour Migration Policy: Rationale, Objectives, Approaches and Results, 1999-2014. OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers (185), 1-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The European Union's External Labour Migration Policy: Rationale, Objectives, Approaches and Results, 1999-2014
2016 (English)In: OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers, ISSN 1815-199X, no 185, p. 1-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is part of the joint project between the Directorate General for Migration and Home Affairs of the European Commission and the OECD’s Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs on “Review of Labour Migration Policy in Europe”.

This document has been produced with the financial assistance of the European Union. The views expressed herein can in no way be taken to reflect the official opinion of the European Union.

Grant: HOME/2013/EIFX/CA/002 / 30-CE-0615920/00-38 (DI130895)

A previous version of this paper (DELSA/ELSA/MI(2015)2) was presented and discussed at the OECD Working Party on Migration in June 2015.

This paper presents an overview and analysis of the policy development at the EU level regarding external labour migration (ELM). It reviews the shift in ELM policy at the EU level by examining documents and debates. It looks at the treatment of ELM, setting out from the Amsterdam Treaty and then follows the development up to the present, paying close attention to the evolving rational for increasing ELM. The difference between the horizontal approach and the sectoral approach is explained. The major ELM Directives under the sectoral approach are presented and discussed in terms of how they were negotiated and how they fit into the overall ELM policy strategy. The document concludes by identifying current political challenges for expanding the EU approach beyond its present form.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Paris: OECD Publishing, 2016
National Category
Political Science International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145534 (URN)10.1787/5jlwxbxflc0r-en (DOI)
Available from: 2018-03-05 Created: 2018-03-05 Last updated: 2018-04-13Bibliographically approved
Hansen, P. & Jonsson, S. (2015). Echoes of empire: memory, identity and the legacy of imperialism. London: I.B. Tauris
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Echoes of empire: memory, identity and the legacy of imperialism
2015 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

How does our colonial past echo through today's global politics? How have former empire-builders sought vindication or atonement, and formerly colonized states reversal or retribution? This groundbreaking book presents a panoramic view of attitudes to empires past and present, seen not only through the hard politics of international power structures but also through the nuances of memory, historiography and national and minority cultural identities.

Bringing together leading historians, political scientists and international relations scholars from across the globe, Echoes of Empire emphasizes Europe's colonial legacy while also highlighting the importance of non-European power centres – Ottoman, Russian, Chinese, Japanese – in shaping world politics, then and now. Echoes of Empire bridges the divide between disciplines to trace the global routes travelled by objects, ideas and people, and forms a radically different notion of the term 'empire' itself. This will be an essential companion to courses on international relations and imperial history as well as a fascinating read for anyone interested in Western

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: I.B. Tauris, 2015. p. 496
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67864 (URN)978-17-845-3051-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-04-29 Created: 2011-04-29 Last updated: 2015-09-22Bibliographically approved
Hansen, P. & Jonsson, S. (2015). EU Migration Policy Towards Africa: Demographic Logics and Colonial Legacies. In: Sandra Ponzanesi and Gianmaria Colpani (Ed.), Postcolonial Transitions in Europe: Contexts, Practices and Politics (pp. 47-67). London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EU Migration Policy Towards Africa: Demographic Logics and Colonial Legacies
2015 (English)In: Postcolonial Transitions in Europe: Contexts, Practices and Politics / [ed] Sandra Ponzanesi and Gianmaria Colpani, London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015, p. 47-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter analyzes current EU–African migration policy, but argues that it must be understood in its historical context. Whereas migration today is to be managed in the framework of a EU–African partnership model built on equality and mutual ‘win–win’ dynamics, a closer look at the history of EU–African migration reveals striking parallels between past and present. From the 1920s onward, the migration policies devised within various frameworks of European integration have been shaped by demographic projections. Each time demography has governed European migration policy vis–à–vis Africa, what has first been introduced as a mutual interest has quickly been transformed into a geopolitical relationship, where one partner has channeled migration to its own benefit. It is thus argued that unless scholars start to attend to European integration’s crucial colonial history, current power asymmetries between the ‘partners’ will not only remain obscure, we will also fail to recognize the continued currency of colonial ideology in the EU’s African relations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2015
Series
Frontiers of the Political
Keywords
colonialism; demography; Eurafrica; EU–African Partnership; geopolitics; migration
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations History Globalisation Studies Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121871 (URN)978-1-78348-446-1 (ISBN)978-1-78348-445-4 (ISBN)978-1-78348-447-8 (e-book) (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-10-12 Created: 2015-10-12 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Hansen, P. & Jonsson, S. (2015). Eurafrika: EU:s koloniala rötter. Stockholm: Leopard Förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eurafrika: EU:s koloniala rötter
2015 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

EU presenteras ofta som ett fredsprojekt. Men bakom fasaden döljer sig en helt annan historia.

För politiker, opinionsbildare och organisationer som från mellankrigstiden och framåt arbetade för europeisk integration stod Afrika i centrum för intresset. Exploateringen av kolonierna krävde samarbete och gemensamma investeringar. Målet var ett tredje block - Eurafrika - som skulle säkra Europas geopolitiska ställning mot de bägge supermakterna.Europas enande skulle alltså börja i Afrika.

Eurafrika är en bok som redan väckt internationell uppmärksamhet. Den gör upp med myten om EU som fredsprojekt och konstaterar att dagens EU knappast hade existerat om det inte från början utformats som en eurafrikansk gemenskap.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Leopard Förlag, 2015. p. 282
Keywords
Kolonier, Geopolitik, Historia, Afrika, Europa, 1900-talet
National Category
History Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies) Globalisation Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112162 (URN)9789173435864 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-11-18 Created: 2014-11-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Hansen, P. & Jonsson, S. (2015). 'Europas plantage: Afrikas plats i EU:s historia'. K & K: kultur og klasse : kritik og kulturanalyse, 43(119), 55-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Europas plantage: Afrikas plats i EU:s historia'
2015 (Swedish)In: K & K: kultur og klasse : kritik og kulturanalyse, ISSN 0905-6998, E-ISSN 2246-2589, Vol. 43, no 119, p. 55-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This essay describes the history of the Eurafrican project as it evolved from the Pan-European movement in the 1920s to its institutionalization in the European Economic Community (i.e. today’s EU) in the late 1950s. By way of conclusion, the article also discusses how this history affects current relations between Africa and the EU. As shown in the article practically all of the visions, movements and concrete institutional arrangements working towards European integration during this period placed Africa’s incorporation into the European enterprise as a central objective. European integration, it is argued, was thus inextricably bound up with a Eurafrican project. According to the geopolitical discourse on Eurafrica that became politically operative in the aftermath of World War II, a future European community presupposed the transformation of the strictly national colonial projects into a joint European colonization of Africa. Indeed, there is strong evidence to support that these ideas were instrumental in the actual, diplomatic and political constitution of the EU, or of Europe as a political subject. As the article shows, the history of Eurafrica, which is largely ignored in scholarship on the EU as well as in colonial studies, cannot be understood within a “continentalist” framework, but prompts a reconceptualization of the historical relation Africa and Europe.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Odense, Denmark: Institut for Kulturvidenskaber, Syddansk Universitet, 2015
National Category
History Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121663 (URN)
Available from: 2015-09-30 Created: 2015-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0497-473X

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