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Hällgren, Mathias
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 118) Show all publications
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2015). Cognitive inhibition, WMC, and speech-recognition-in-noise. In: 3rd International conference in Cognitive Hearing Science and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015.: . Paper presented at Cognitive Hearing SCience and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognitive inhibition, WMC, and speech-recognition-in-noise
2015 (English)In: 3rd International conference in Cognitive Hearing Science and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015., 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive abilities are important for a number of human attributes, such as making sense of communication, holding information active in memory, and making decisions. When it is the goal to focus on a single target voice, and resist intrusions from irrelevant information, cognitive inhibition can aid us in our endeavour. Cognitive inhibition is thought to support and co-operate with working memory. Abilities such as cognitive inhibition and working memory are also important for speech processing, even more so when listening to speech under adverse conditions. In order to assess different difficulties that can arise in every day listening situations, it´s of importance to have solid methods for measuring cognitive abilities. In the present study we present a task assessing cognitive inhibition, and how it relates to individual working memory capacity (WMC), and speech-recognition-in-noise. Forty-six young normally-hearing individuals were presented with a cognitive test battery, as well as a speech-in-noise test. Our results suggest that individuals with high WMC, also exhibit good cognitive inhibition. The results also indicate that those who perform well in the cognitive inhibition task need less favourable signal-to-noise-ratios in the speech-recognition task. Our findings indicate that capacity to resist semantic interference can be used to predict performance in speech-recognition tasks when listening under adverse conditions. 

Keywords
speech in noise, working memory, inhibition, normal hearing, working memory capacity
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126356 (URN)
Conference
Cognitive Hearing SCience and Communication, Linköping 14-17 June, 2015
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 8723111202
Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2016-04-11Bibliographically approved
Kilman, L., Zekveld, A. A., Hällgren, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Episodic long-term memory by native and non-native stories masked by speech.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Episodic long-term memory by native and non-native stories masked by speech
2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the current study was to investigate how well normal-hearing adults recalled Swedish (native) and English (non-native) fictional stories masked by speech in Swedish and English. Each story was 15 min long and divided into three parts of 5 min each. One part was masked by Swedish speech, one by English speech and one was presented unmasked as a baseline. Audibility was rated immediately after listening to each fragment. Episodic long-term memory was assessed using 24 multiple choice questions (4AFC). Every 8 questions corresponded to 5 min of recorded story and included 4 simple and 4 complex questions. Participants also performed complex span test of working memory capacity and proficiency tests in Swedish and English. The main result was that the stories in quiet were significantly better recalled than the stories masked by Swedish. Although the stimuli were correctly identified at the perceptual level, challenging listening

National Category
Clinical Medicine Neurosciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121033 (URN)
Available from: 2015-09-03 Created: 2015-09-03 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Kilman, L., Zekveld, A., Hällgren, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Native and Non-native Speech Perception by Hearing-Impaired Listeners in Noise- and Speech Maskers. TRENDS IN HEARING, 19, 1-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Native and Non-native Speech Perception by Hearing-Impaired Listeners in Noise- and Speech Maskers
2015 (English)In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 19, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study evaluated how hearing-impaired listeners perceive native (Swedish) and nonnative (English) speech in the presence of noise- and speech maskers. Speech reception thresholds were measured for four different masker types for each target language. The maskers consisted of stationary and fluctuating noise and two-talker babble in Swedish and English. Twenty-three hearing-impaired native Swedish listeners participated, aged between 28 and 65 years. The participants also performed cognitive tests of working memory capacity in Swedish and English, nonverbal reasoning, and an English proficiency test. Results indicated that the speech maskers were more interfering than the noise maskers in both target languages. The larger need for phonetic and semantic cues in a nonnative language makes a stationary masker relatively more challenging than a fluctuating-noise masker. Better hearing acuity (pure tone average) was associated with better perception of the target speech in Swedish, and better English proficiency was associated with better speech perception in English. Larger working memory and better pure tone averages were related to the better perception of speech masked with fluctuating noise in the nonnative language. This suggests that both are relevant in highly taxing conditions. A large variance in performance between the listeners was observed, especially for speech perception in the nonnative language.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2015
Keywords
speech perception; native and nonnative; noise- and speech maskers; nonnative language proficiency; cognitive abilities
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118984 (URN)10.1177/2331216515579127 (DOI)000354486300002 ()25910504 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [349-2007-8654]

Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-05 Last updated: 2018-01-11
van Esch, T., Lutman, M., Vorman, M., Lyzenga, J., Hällgren, M., Larsby, B., . . . Dreschler, W. A. (2015). Relations between psychophysical measures of spatial hearing and self-reported spatial- hearing abilities. International Journal of Audiology, 54(3), 182-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relations between psychophysical measures of spatial hearing and self-reported spatial- hearing abilities
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 182-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate how well the virtual psychophysical measures of spatial hearing from the preliminary auditory profile predict self-reported spatial-hearing abilities. Design: Virtual spatial-hearings tests (conducted unaided, via headphones) and a questionnaire were administered in five centres in Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the UK. Correlations and stepwise linear regression models were calculated among a group of hearing-impaired listeners. Study sample: Thirty normal-hearing listeners aged 19–39 years, and 72 hearing-impaired listeners aged 22–91 years with a broad range of hearing losses, including asymmetrical and mixed hearing losses. Results: Several significant correlations (between 0.24 and 0.54) were found between results of virtual psychophysical spatial-hearing tests and self-reported localization abilities. Stepwise linear regression analyses showed that the minimum audible angle (MAA) test was a significant predictor for self-reported localization abilities (5% extra explained variance), and the spatial speech reception threshold (SRT) benefit test for self-reported listening to speech in spatial situations (6% extra explained variance). Conclusions: The MAA test and spatial SRT benefit test are indicative measures of everyday binaural functioning. The binaural SRT benefit test was not found to predict self-reported spatial-hearing abilities. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/14992027.2014.953216

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Spatial hearing, hearing impaired, clinical tests, multi-centre study, audiological diagnosis, auditory profile
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115140 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.953216 (DOI)000350644400005 ()25491328 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council
Available from: 2015-03-09 Created: 2015-03-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Kilman, L., Zekveld, A. A., Hällgren, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2015). Subjective ratings of masker disturbance during the perception of native and non-native speech. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, Article ID 1065.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subjective ratings of masker disturbance during the perception of native and non-native speech
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1065Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to address how 43 normal-hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners subjectively experienced the disturbance generated by four masker conditions (i.e., stationary noise, fluctuating noise, Swedish two-talker babble and English two-talker babble) while listening to speech in two target languages, i.e., Swedish (native) or English (non-native). The participants were asked to evaluate their noise-disturbance experience on a continuous scale from 0 to 10 immediately after having performed each listening condition. The data demonstrated a three-way interaction effect between target language, masker condition, and group (HI versus NH). The HI listeners experienced the Swedish-babble masker as significantly more disturbing for the native target language (Swedish) than for the non-native language (English). Additionally, this masker was significantly more disturbing than each of the other masker types during the perception of Swedish target speech. The NH listeners, on the other hand, indicated that the Swedish speech-masker was more disturbing than the stationary and the fluctuating noise-maskers for the perception of English target speech. The NH listeners perceived more disturbance from the speech maskers than the noise maskers. The HI listeners did not perceive the speech maskers as generally more disturbing than the noise maskers. However, they had particular difficulty with the perception of native speech masked by native babble, a common condition in daily-life listening conditions. These results suggest that the characteristics of the different maskers applied in the current study seem to affect the perceived disturbance differently in HI and NH listeners. There was no general difference in the perceived disturbance across conditions between the HI listeners and the NH listeners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers, 2015
Keywords
perceived disturbance, native, non-native, speech maskers, noise maskers, working memory
National Category
Clinical Medicine Neurosciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121032 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01065 (DOI)000359938800001 ()
Available from: 2015-09-03 Created: 2015-09-03 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Larsby, B., Hällgren, M., Nilsson, L. & McAllister, A. (2015). The influence of female versus malespeakers’ voice on speech recognitionthresholds in noise: Effects of low and high-frequency hearing impairment. Speech, Language and Hearing, 18(2), 84-90
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The influence of female versus malespeakers’ voice on speech recognitionthresholds in noise: Effects of low and high-frequency hearing impairment
2015 (English)In: Speech, Language and Hearing, ISSN 2050-571X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 84-90Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To investigate the effect of female versus male speakers’ voice on the ability to recognize speech innoise in two groups of sensorineural hearing-impaired listeners, one group with impairment at lowfrequencies and the other at high frequencies.Method: Eight participants with high-frequency hearing impairments (Hf-HI) and seven with low-frequencyhearing impairments (Lf-HI) participated. Sixteen normal hearing (NH) participants served as reference.The sentences from the hearing in noise test, read by a female or a male speaker, were presentedmonaurally with a background noise. In an adaptive procedure, the mean speech recognition threshold,for 50% correctly recognized sentences, was calculated for the female and male voice and each test subject.Results: The Hf-HI group had significantly greater difference in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) results betweenfemale and male voices. Irrespective of hearing impairment, the female voice required 2.1 dB better SNR.In addition, the NH group showed a small but significant difference in favor of the male voice.Conclusions: Results indicate that speaker gender matters for hearing impaired and NH individuals’ ability torecognize speech in noise.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
W.S. Maney & Son Ltd, 2015
Keywords
Fundamental frequency, Hearing impairment, Speech in noise, Hearing in noise test, Speech recognition threshold
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125425 (URN)10.1179/2050572814Y.0000000053 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-23 Created: 2016-02-23 Last updated: 2016-04-24Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2015). The role of cognitive abilities in younger and older normally hearing adults when listening to speech under adverse conditions. In: Larry E Humes (Ed.), 6th Aging and Speech Communication Research Conference 2015 (“ASC15”) Bloomington, Indiana, USA October 11-14, 2015: . Paper presented at Aging and Speech Communication.. Swedish institute for disability research Linaeus centre head graduate school.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of cognitive abilities in younger and older normally hearing adults when listening to speech under adverse conditions
2015 (English)In: 6th Aging and Speech Communication Research Conference 2015 (“ASC15”) Bloomington, Indiana, USA October 11-14, 2015 / [ed] Larry E Humes, 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Cognitive abilities, such as working memory capacity (WMC), lexical decision making, and cognitive inhibition, can help predict performance on speech-recognition-in-noise tasks. Working memory is assumed to play a major part in every day listening situations, storing and actively working with relevant information, while inhibitory control helps to suppress and separate irrelevant information from interfering with the information processing. With increasing age, comes decreasing cognitive abilities, such as declines in WMC, speed of information processing, and inhibitory control, leading to problems when selectively attending to speech while inhibiting interfering distractors. The aim of the present study was to examine age-related declines in WMC, inhibitory control, and lexical decision making, and their respective roles when listening to speech under adverse listening conditions. Twenty-four young normally-hearing (NH), and 24 elderly ( for their age) NH individuals participated in the study. They completing a cognitive test battery assessing WMC, cognitive inhibition, and lexical decision making, as well as a closed-set (Hagerman sentences) and an open-set (HINT) speech-recognition-in-noise task masked with different maskers. We will present results comparing cognitive abilities in younger normally-hearing individuals with elderly normally-hearing individuals, and how age and cognitive abilities relates to performance on speech-recognition-in-noise tasks.

Keywords
speech-in-noise, speech recognition, inhibition, verbal ability, hearing, working memory capacity, listening effort
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122386 (URN)
Conference
Aging and Speech Communication.. Swedish institute for disability research Linaeus centre head graduate school
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Available from: 2015-10-30 Created: 2015-10-30 Last updated: 2016-03-24Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2015). the Speech recognition under adverse listening conditions in young normally-hearing listeners. In: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping, 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden.: . Paper presented at Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>the Speech recognition under adverse listening conditions in young normally-hearing listeners
2015 (English)In: Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, Linköping, 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden., 2015Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In the present study we aimed to investigate individual differences in cognitive inhibition, WMC, and how they relate to performance on a speech-recognition-in-noise task. Sixteen young normally-hearing individuals were presented with a cognitive test battery, as well as a sentence corpus masked by 5 different maskers, targeting 80% speech-recognition. One masker was a slightly modulated (10%) speech-shaped noise (SSN), 2 maskers were constructed by modulating the SSN with the envelopes from a single female talker, and the international speech test signal (ISTS). We also masked the target sentences with the ISTS, and a single female talker reading a passage in a Swedish newspaper. Our results showed that cognitive inhibition is significantly related to performance when maskers with meaningful, semantic information is used. The results further indicate that young normally-hearing individuals can take advantage of temporal and spectral dips to fill in missing information. Our findings suggest that choice of speech material is of importance for the outcome in speech-recognition-in-noise tasks. We further propose that tasks of cognitive inhibition can be used to predict performance in a speech-recognition task.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126357 (URN)
Conference
Third International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication 14-17 June, 2015. Sweden.
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 8723111202
Available from: 2016-03-22 Created: 2016-03-22 Last updated: 2016-04-11Bibliographically approved
Stenbäck, V., Hällgren, M., Lyxell, B. & Larsby, B. (2015). The Swedish Hayling task, and its relation to working memory, verbal ability, and speech-recognition-in-noise. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 56(3), 264-272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish Hayling task, and its relation to working memory, verbal ability, and speech-recognition-in-noise
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 264-272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cognitive functions and speech-recognition-in-noise were evaluated with a cognitive test battery, assessing response inhibition using the Hayling task, working memory capacity (WMC) and verbal information processing, and an auditory test of speech recognition. The cognitive tests were performed in silence whereas the speech recognition task was presented in noise. Thirty young normally-hearing individuals participated in the study. The aim of the study was to investigate one executive function, response inhibition, and whether it is related to individual working memory capacity (WMC), and how speech-recognition-in-noise relates to WMC and inhibitory control. The results showed a significant difference between initiation and response inhibition, suggesting that the Hayling task taps cognitive activity responsible for executive control. Our findings also suggest that high verbal ability was associated with better performance in the Hayling task. We also present findings suggesting that individuals who perform well on tasks involving response inhibition, and WMC, also perform well on a speech-in-noise task. Our findings indicate that capacity to resist semantic interference can be used to predict performance on speech-in-noise tasks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2015
Keywords
executive functions, inhibition, cognitive control, working memory capacity, speech recognition in noise, hearing
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117054 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12206 (DOI)000354185700003 ()25819210 (PubMedID)
Projects
Tal som störning vid språklig kommunikation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2009-1753
Available from: 2015-04-14 Created: 2015-04-14 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Moradi, S., Lidestam, B., Hällgren, M. & Rönnberg, J. (2014). Gated auditory speech perception in elderly hearing aid users and elderly normal-hearing individuals: effects of hearing impairment and cognitive capacity. Trends in Hearing, 18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gated auditory speech perception in elderly hearing aid users and elderly normal-hearing individuals: effects of hearing impairment and cognitive capacity
2014 (English)In: Trends in Hearing, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study compared elderly hearing aid (EHA) users and elderly normal-hearing (ENH) individuals on identification of auditory speech stimuli (consonants, words, and final word in sentences) that were different when considering their linguistic properties. We measured the accuracy with which the target speech stimuli were identified, as well as the isolation points (IPs: the shortest duration, from onset, required to correctly identify the speech target). The relationships between working memory capacity, the IPs, and speech accuracy were also measured. Twenty-four EHA users (with mild to moderate hearing impairment) and 24 ENH individuals participated in the present study. Despite the use of their regular hearing aids, the EHA users had delayed IPs and were less accurate in identifying consonants and words compared with the ENH individuals. The EHA users also had delayed IPs for final word identification in sentences with lower predictability; however, no significant between-group difference in accuracy was observed. Finally, there were no significant between-group differences in terms of IPs or accuracy for final word identification in highly predictable sentences. Our results also showed that, among EHA users, greater working memory capacity was associated with earlier IPs and improved accuracy in consonant and word identification. Together, our findings demonstrate that the gated speech perception ability of EHA users was not at the level of ENH individuals, in terms of IPs and accuracy. In addition, gated speech perception was more cognitively demanding for EHA users than for ENH individuals in the absence of semantic context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
hearing aid users, gating paradigm, speech perception, cognition
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109067 (URN)10.1177/2331216514545406 (DOI)000343753700007 ()25085610 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 349-2007-8654
Available from: 2014-08-04 Created: 2014-08-04 Last updated: 2015-08-12Bibliographically approved
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