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Arnqvist, Hans
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Gutefeldt, K., Hedman, C. A., Thyberg, I. S., Bachrach-Lindström, M., Arnqvist, H. & Spångeus, A. (2017). Upper extremity impairments in type 1 diabetes with long duration: common problems with great impact on daily life. Disability and Rehabilitation, 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Upper extremity impairments in type 1 diabetes with long duration: common problems with great impact on daily life
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2017 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence, activity limitations and potential risk factors of upper extremity impairments in type 1 diabetes in comparison to controls.

METHODS: In a cross-sectional population-based study in the southeast of Sweden, patients with type 1 diabetes <35 years at onset, duration ≥20 years, <67 years old and matched controls were invited to answer a questionnaire on upper extremity impairments and activity limitations and to take blood samples.

RESULTS: Seven hundred and seventy-three patients (ages 50 ± 10 years, diabetes duration 35 ± 10 years) and 708 controls (ages 54 ± 9 years) were included. Shoulder pain and stiffness, hand paraesthesia and finger impairments were common in patients with a prevalence of 28-48%, which was 2-4-folds higher than in controls. Compared to controls, the patients had more bilateral impairments, often had coexistence of several upper extremity impairments, and in the presence of impairments, reported more pronounced activity limitations. Female gender (1.72 (1.066-2.272), p = 0.014), longer duration (1.046 (1.015-1.077), p = 0.003), higher body mass index (1.08 (1.017-1.147), p = 0.013) and HbA1c (1.029 (1.008-1.05), p = 0.007) were associated with upper extremity impairments.

CONCLUSIONS: Compared to controls, patients with type 1 diabetes have a high prevalence of upper extremity impairments, often bilateral, which are strongly associated with activity limitations. Recognising these in clinical practise is crucial, and improved preventative, therapeutic and rehabilitative interventions are needed. Implications for rehabilitation Upper extremity impairments affecting the shoulder, hand and fingers are common in patients with type 1 diabetes, the prevalence being 2-4-fold higher compared to non-diabetic persons. Patients with diabetes type 1 with upper extremity impairments have more pronounced limitations in daily activities compared to controls with similar impairments. Recognising upper extremity impairments and activity limitations are important and improved preventive, therapeutic and rehabilitation methods are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Dupuytren’s disease, Type 1 diabetes, carpal tunnel syndrome, frozen shoulder, trigger finger disorder
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144020 (URN)10.1080/09638288.2017.1397202 (DOI)29105514 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85033477270 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-01-03 Created: 2018-01-03 Last updated: 2018-06-15Bibliographically approved
van Dijk, P. R., Logtenberg, S. J. J., Chisalita, I. S., Hedman, C., Groenier, K. H., Gans, R. O. B., . . . Bilo, H. J. G. (2016). Different Effects of Intraperitoneal and Subcutaneous Insulin Administration on the GH-IGF-1 Axis in Type 1 Diabetes. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 101(6), 2493-2501
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different Effects of Intraperitoneal and Subcutaneous Insulin Administration on the GH-IGF-1 Axis in Type 1 Diabetes
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 101, no 6, p. 2493-2501Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context: In type 1 diabetes mellitus, low levels of insulin-like growth factor -1 (IGF-1) and IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and high levels of GH and IGFBP-1 are present, probably due to portal vein insulinopenia. Objective: To test the hypothesis that continuous ip insulin infusion (CIPII) has a more pronounced effect than sc insulin therapy on regulation of the GH-IGF-1 axis. Design: This was a prospective, observational case-control study. Measurements were performed twice at a 26-week interval. Setting: Two secondary care hospitals in the Netherlands participated in the study. Patients: There were a total of 184 patients, age-and gender-matched, of which 39 used CIPII and 145 sc insulin therapy for the past 4 years. Outcomes: Primary endpoint included differences in IGF-1. Secondary outcomes were differences in GH, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-3. Results: IGF-1 was higher with CIPII as compared to SC insulin therapy: 124 mu g/liter (95% confidence interval [CI], 111-138) vs 108 mu g/liter (95% CI 102-115) (P = .035). Additionally, IGFBP-3 concentrations were higher and IGFBP-1 and GH concentrations were lower with CIPII as compared to SC insulin therapy: 3.78 mg/liter (95% CI, 3.49 - 4.10) vs 3.31 mg/liter (95% CI, 3.173.47) for IGFBP-3, 50.9 mu g/liter (95% CI, 37.9 - 68.2) vs 102.6 mu g/liter (95% CI, 87.8 - 119.8) for IGFBP-1 and 0.68 mu g/liter (95% CI, 0.44 - 1.06) vs 1.21 mu g/liter (95% CI, 0.95-1.54) for GH, respectively. In multivariate analysis, IGF-1 had no significant association with HbA1c. Conclusions: The GH-IGF-1 axis may be affected by the route of insulin administration with CIPII counteracting dysregulation of the GH-IGF1 axis present during sc insulin therapy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ENDOCRINE SOC, 2016
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130291 (URN)10.1210/jc.2016-1473 (DOI)000378821100026 ()27115061 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Zwols Wetenschapsfonds Isala Klinieken; Sanofi-Aventis The Netherlands B.V.

Available from: 2016-07-31 Created: 2016-07-28 Last updated: 2017-04-24
Wahlberg Topp, J., Ekman, B., Nystrom, L., Hanson, U., Persson, B. & Arnqvist, H. (2016). Gestational diabetes: Glycaemic predictors for fetal macrosomia and maternal risk of future diabetes. Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, 114, 99-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gestational diabetes: Glycaemic predictors for fetal macrosomia and maternal risk of future diabetes
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2016 (English)In: Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, ISSN 0168-8227, E-ISSN 1872-8227, Vol. 114, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To investigate how glucose levels at diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) are associated with infant birth weight and long-term risk of manifest diabetes mellitus in the mother. Methods: In a case control study GDM pregnancies (n = 2085) were compared with non-GDM pregnancies matched for day of delivery and obstetric unit (n = 3792). GDM was defined as capillary blood glucose (cB-glucose) &gt;9.0 mmol/l (plasma glucose &gt;10.0 mmol/l) after a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The GDM cohort were followed up 8.5-13.5 yrs after initial diagnosis with a questionnaire, answered by 1324 GDM women (65%). Results: GDM women had higher mean infant birth-weight compared with controls (3682 g vs. 3541 g, P &lt; 0.001). In multiple linear regression analysis, birth weight was positively correlated to fasting cB-glucose at GDM diagnosis (P &lt; 0.001), increased week of gestation (P &lt; 0.001) and BMI before pregnancy (P &lt; 0.003), while 2 h OGTT cB-glucose values &gt;= 9.0 mmol/l were not related. Infants born to mothers with fasting cB-glucose &gt;= 4.5 mmol/l had no increased mean birth-weight or macrosomia (&gt;= 4500 g) compared to controls. In the follow up 334/1324 women (25%) of the GDM women had developed diabetes, 215 type 2 diabetes, 46 type 1 diabetes and 72 unclassified diabetes. In logistic regression fasting cB-glucose and 2 h OGTT cB-glucose at diagnosis of GDM as well as BMI &gt;25 and origin outside Europe were risk factors for manifest diabetes. Conclusions: Fasting blood glucose at diagnosis of GDM gives important information besides 2 h OGTT glucose about pregnancy outcome and future risk for maternal diabetes. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2016
Keywords
Birth weight; Pregnancy; GDM; Blood glucose; OGTT
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128751 (URN)10.1016/j.diabres.2015.12.017 (DOI)000375129600015 ()26818892 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Diabetes Association; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); Linkoping University, Sweden

Available from: 2016-05-31 Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2017-04-24
Van dijk, P. R., Logtenberg, S. J., Chisalita, I. S., Hedman, C. A., Groenier, K. H., Gans, R. O., . . . Bilo, H. J. (2015). After 6years of intraperitoneal insulin administration IGF-I concentrations in T1DM patients are at low-normal level.. Growth Hormone & IGF Research, 25(6), 316-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>After 6years of intraperitoneal insulin administration IGF-I concentrations in T1DM patients are at low-normal level.
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2015 (English)In: Growth Hormone & IGF Research, ISSN 1096-6374, E-ISSN 1532-2238, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 316-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Low concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGFI) have been reported in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), suggested to be due to low insulin concentrations in the portal vein. The aim was to describe the long-term course of IGFI concentrations among T1DM subjects treated with continuous intraperitoneal (IP) insulin infusion (CIPII).

DESIGN: Nineteen patients that participated in a randomized cross-over trial comparing CIPII and subcutaneous (SC) insulin therapy in 2006 were followed until 2012. IGF-I measurements were performed at the start of the 2006 study, after the 6month SC- and CIPII treatment phase in 2006 and during CIPII therapy in 2012. Z-scores were calculated to compare the IGF-I concentrations with age-specific normative range values of a non-DM reference population.

RESULTS: In 2012, IGF-I Z-scores (-0.7; 95% confidence interval -1.3, -0.2) were significantly higher than at the start of the 2006 study (-2.5; -3.3, -1.8), the end of the SC (-2.0; -2.6, -1.5) and CIPII (-1.6; -2.1, -1.0) treatment phase with a mean difference of: 1.8 (0.9, 2.7), 1.3 (0.5, 2.1) and 0.8 (0.1, 1.6), respectively.

CONCLUSION: After 6years of treatment with CIPII, IGF-I concentrations among T1DM patients increased to a level that is higher than during prior SC insulin treatment and is in the lower normal range compared to a non-DM reference population. The results of this study suggest that long-term IP insulin administration influences the IGF system in T1DM.

Keywords
IGF-I; Intraperitoneal insulin; Type 1 diabetes mellitus
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124061 (URN)10.1016/j.ghir.2015.08.007 (DOI)000366962800009 ()26336814 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); Stichting Zwols Wetenschapsfonds Isala Klinieken (ZWIK)

Available from: 2016-01-19 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Nordwall, M., Abrahamsson, M., Dhir, M., Fredrikson, M., Ludvigsson, J. & Arnqvist, H. J. (2015). Comment: Response to Comment on Nordwall et al. Impact of HbA1c, Followed From Onset of Type 1 Diabetes, on the Development of Severe Retinopathy and Nephropathy: The VISS Study (Vascular Diabetic Complications in Southeast Sweden). Diabetes Care 2015;38:308-315 [Letter to the editor]. Diabetes Care, 38(8), e124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comment: Response to Comment on Nordwall et al. Impact of HbA1c, Followed From Onset of Type 1 Diabetes, on the Development of Severe Retinopathy and Nephropathy: The VISS Study (Vascular Diabetic Complications in Southeast Sweden). Diabetes Care 2015;38:308-315
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2015 (English)In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 38, no 8, p. e124-Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

We thank Dr. Takahara (1) for the comment on our recent article exploring the impact of HbA1c, followed from diabetes onset, on the development of severe microvascular complications (2). As suggested, we have validated our results with Cox hazards analysis with severe microvascular events, i.e., laser-treated proliferative retinopathy and macroalbuminuria as a dependent variable and HbA1c (mmol/mol) as a time-dependent covariate.

For laser-treated proliferative retinopathy, we found a hazard ratio of 1.038 (95% CI 1.025–1.052, P < 0.001) and for macroalbuminuria, a hazard ratio of 1.075 (95% CI 1.050–1.100, P < 0.001).

Analyzing our data with Cox hazards analysis thus shows the strong influence of long-term HbA1c on severe microvascular complications, in agreement with our previous conclusions.

In our article, we chose to analyze and present the results in a way that was perhaps easier for a clinician to interpret and apply in clinical routine. With life-table analysis we found that the incidence of both laser-treated proliferative retinopathy and macroalbuminuria increased sharply and occurred earlier with increasing long-term weighted mean HbA1c. In the same manner, the prevalence of microvascular complications increased steeply with higher long-term weighted mean HbA1c, categorized in different groups.

In conclusion, our study irrespective of statistical methods shows a strong association between development of late complications and long-term mean HbA1c, and keeping the average HbA1c below 7.6% (60 mmol/mol) seemed sufficient to prevent microvascular complications for at least up to 20 years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Diabetes Association, 2015
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126409 (URN)10.2337/dc15-0939 (DOI)000358673200009 ()26207065 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-23 Created: 2016-03-23 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Nordwall, M., Abrahamsson, M., Dhir, M., Fredrikson, M., Ludvigsson, J. & Arnqvist, H. (2015). Impact of HbA(1c), Followed From Onset of Type 1 Diabetes, on the Development of Severe Retinopathy and Nephropathy: The VISS Study (Vascular Diabetic Complications in Southeast Sweden). Diabetes Care, 38(2), 308-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of HbA(1c), Followed From Onset of Type 1 Diabetes, on the Development of Severe Retinopathy and Nephropathy: The VISS Study (Vascular Diabetic Complications in Southeast Sweden)
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2015 (English)In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 308-315Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVEHbA(1c) is strongly related to the development of diabetes complications, but it is still controversial which HbA(1c) level to strive for in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. The aim of the current study was to evaluate HbA(1c), followed from diagnosis, as a predictor of severe microvascular complications and to formulate HbA(1c) target levels for treatment.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSA longitudinal observation study followed an unselected population of 451 patients diagnosed with type 1 diabetes during 1983-1987 before the age of 35 years in a region of Southeast Sweden. Retinopathy was evaluated by fundus photography and nephropathy data collected from medical records. HbA(1c) was measured starting from diagnosis and during the whole follow-up period of 20-24 years. Long-term weighted mean HbA(1c) was then calculated. Complications were analyzed in relation to HbA(1c) levels.RESULTSThe incidence of proliferative retinopathy and persistent macroalbuminuria increased sharply and occurred earlier with increasing long-term mean HbA(1c). None of the 451 patients developed proliferative retinopathy or persistent macroalbuminuria below long-term weighted mean HbA(1c) 7.6% (60 mmol/mol); 51% of the patients with long-term mean HbA(1c) above 9.5% (80 mmol/mol) developed proliferative retinopathy and 23% persistent macroalbuminuria.CONCLUSIONSLong-term weighted mean HbA(1c), measured from diagnosis, is closely associated with the development of severe complications in type 1 diabetes. Keeping HbA(1c) below 7.6% (60 mmol/mol) as a treatment target seems to prevent proliferative retinopathy and persistent macroalbuminuria for up to 20 years.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Diabetes Association, 2015
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114569 (URN)10.2337/dc14-1203 (DOI)000348461400032 ()25510400 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Child Diabetes Foundation (Barndiabetesfonden); Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (Forskningsradet I Sydostra Sverige)

Available from: 2015-03-02 Created: 2015-02-26 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Svensson, M. K., Tyrberg, M., Nystrom, L., Arnqvist, H., Bolinder, J., Ostman, J., . . . Eriksson, J. W. (2015). The risk for diabetic nephropathy is low in young adults in a 17-year follow-up from the Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden (DISS). Older age and higher BMI at diabetes onset can be important risk factors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, 31(2), 138-146
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The risk for diabetic nephropathy is low in young adults in a 17-year follow-up from the Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden (DISS). Older age and higher BMI at diabetes onset can be important risk factors
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2015 (English)In: Diabetes/Metabolism Research Reviews, ISSN 1520-7552, E-ISSN 1520-7560, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimsThe main objective of this study was to estimate the occurrence of diabetic nephropathy in a population-based cohort of patients diagnosed with diabetes as young adults (15-34years). MethodsAll 794 patients registered 1987-1988 in the Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden (DISS) were invited to a follow-up study 15-19years after diagnosis, and 468 (58%) participated. Analysis of islet antibodies was used to classify type of diabetes. ResultsAfter median 17years of diabetes, 15% of all patients, 14% T1DM and 25% T2DM, were diagnosed with diabetic nephropathy. Ninety-one percent had microalbuminuria and 8.6% macroalbuminuria. Older age at diagnosis (HR 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.10 per year) was an independent and a higher BMI at diabetes diagnosis (HR 1.04; 95% CI 1.00-1.09 per 1kg/m(2)), a near-significant predictor of development of diabetic nephropathy. Age at onset of diabetes (p=0.041), BMI (p=0.012) and HbA1c (pless than0.001) were significant predictors of developing diabetic nephropathy between 9 and 17years of diabetes. At 17years of diabetes duration, a high HbA1c level (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.03-1.08 per 1mmol/mol increase) and systolic blood pressure (OR 1.08; 95% CI 1.051.12 per 1mmHg increase) were associated with DN. ConclusionsPatients with T2DM diagnosed as young adults seem to have an increased risk to develop diabetic nephropathy compared with those with T1DM. Older age and higher BMI at diagnosis of diabetes were risk markers for development of diabetic nephropathy. In addition, poor glycaemic control but not systolic blood pressure at 9years of follow-up was a risk marker for later development of diabetic nephropathy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley: 12 months, 2015
Keywords
diabetic nephropathy; hyperglycaemia; blood pressure; type 1 diabetes mellitus; type 2 diabetes mellitus; islet antibodies
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116523 (URN)10.1002/dmrr.2574 (DOI)000349969600003 ()25044633 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Diabetes Association; Lundstrom Foundation; Novo-Nordisk Foundation; Malmo University Hospital; Swedish Research Council [14531, 14287]; Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation-Wallenberg Diabetes Research Program [K98-99 JD-128B]; Swedish Life Insurance Foundation; Trygg-Hansa Foundation; Faculty of Medicine at Umea University; Swedish Association for Patients with Kidney Disease; Swedish Society of Medicine and Heart and Lung foundation

Available from: 2015-03-27 Created: 2015-03-27 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Sjöstrand, M., Carlson, K., Arnqvist, H., Gudbjörnsdottir, S., Landin-Olsson, M., Lindmark, S., . . . Bolinder, J. (2014). Assessment of beta-cell function in young patients with type 2 diabetes: arginine-stimulated insulin secretion may reflect beta-cell reserve. Journal of Internal Medicine, 275(1), 39-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of beta-cell function in young patients with type 2 diabetes: arginine-stimulated insulin secretion may reflect beta-cell reserve
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 275, no 1, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

Simple methods for the evaluation of dynamic β-cell function in epidemiological and clinical studies of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dynamic beta-cell function in young patients with T2D with different disease durations and treatments.

Methods

Overall, 54 subjects with T2D from the Diabetes Incidence Study in Sweden (DISS) and 23 healthy control participants were included in this cross-sectional study. Beta-cell function was assessed by intravenous (i.v.) administration of arginine followed by i.v. glucose. The acute insulin and C-peptide responses to arginine (AIRarg and Ac-pepRarg, respectively) and to glucose (AIRglu and Ac-pepRglu, respectively) were estimated. Homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β) and C-peptide assessments were also used for comparisons between patients with T2D and control participants.

Results

AIRarg and Ac-pepRarg, but not AIRglu and Ac-pepRglu, could differentiate between patients with different disease durations. AIRglu values were 89% (P < 0.001) lower and AIRarg values were 29% (P < 0.01) lower in patients with T2D compared with control participants. HOMA-β and fasting plasma C-peptide levels did not differ between the T2D and control groups.

Conclusion

In young patients with T2D, the insulin secretory response to i.v. glucose is markedly attenuated, whereas i.v. arginine-stimulated insulin release is better preserved and can distinguish between patients with different disease duration and antidiabetic therapies. This suggests that the i.v. arginine stimulation test may provide an estimate of functional beta-cell reserve.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
type 2 diabetes, b-cell function
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102970 (URN)10.1111/joim.12116 (DOI)000328157100004 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|AstraZeneca||

Available from: 2014-01-09 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
van Dijk, P. R., Logtenberg, S. J., Groenier, K. H., Kleefstra, N., Bilo, H. J. & Arnqvist, H. (2014). Effect of i.p. insulin administration on IGF1 and IGFBP1 in type 1 diabetes.. Endocrine connections, 3(1), 17-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of i.p. insulin administration on IGF1 and IGFBP1 in type 1 diabetes.
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2014 (English)In: Endocrine connections, ISSN 2049-3614, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 17-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), low concentrations of IGF1 and high concentrations of IGF-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) have been reported. It has been suggested that these abnormalities in the GH-IGF1 axis are due to low insulin concentrations in the portal vein. We hypothesized that the i.p. route of insulin administration increases IGF1 concentrations when compared with the s.c. route of insulin administration. IGF1 and IGFBP1 concentrations in samples derived from an open-label, randomized cross-over trial comparing the effects of s.c. and i.p. insulin delivery on glycaemia were determined. T1DM patients were randomized to receive either 6 months of continuous i.p. insulin infusion (CIPII) through an implantable pump (MIP 2007C, Medtronic) followed by 6 months of s.c. insulin infusion or vice versa with a washout phase in between. Data from 16 patients who had complete measurements during both treatment phases were analysed. The change in IGF1 concentrations during CIPII treatment was 10.4 μg/l (95% CI -0.94, 21.7 μg/l; P=0.06) and during s.c. insulin treatment was -2.2 μg/l (95% CI -13.5, 9.2 μg/l; P=0.69). When taking the effect of treatment order into account, the estimated change in IGF1 concentrations was found to be 12.6 μg/l (95% CI -3.1, 28.5 μg/l; P=0.11) with CIPII treatment compared with that with s.c. insulin treatment. IGFBP1 concentrations decreased to -100.7 μg/l (95% CI -143.0, -58.3 μg/l; P<0.01) with CIPII treatment. During CIPII treatment, parts of the GH-IGF1 axis changed compared with that observed during s.c. insulin treatment. This supports the hypothesis that the i.p. route of insulin administration is of importance in the IGF1 system.

National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113131 (URN)10.1530/EC-13-0089 (DOI)24327601 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-12 Created: 2015-01-12 Last updated: 2015-01-20
Hedman, C. A., Frystyk, J., Lindström, T., Oskarsson, P. & Arnqvist, H. J. (2014). Intraperitoneal insulin delivery to patients with type 1 diabetes results in higher serum IGF-I bioactivity than continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Clinical Endocrinology, 81(1), 58-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intraperitoneal insulin delivery to patients with type 1 diabetes results in higher serum IGF-I bioactivity than continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion
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2014 (English)In: Clinical Endocrinology, ISSN 0300-0664, E-ISSN 1365-2265, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 58-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with low IGF-I and altered levels of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) in plasma. This may be of importance for insulin sensitivity and the risk of developing diabetic complications. We hypothesized that IGF-I bioactivity is affected by the route of insulin administration and that continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) has a more pronounced effect than continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII).

Design and methods

We compared 10 patients with T1D on CIPII with 20 age- and sex-matched patients on CSII. Blood sampling was carried out 7–9 am after an overnight fast. All patients were C-peptide negative. IGF-I bioactivity was measured in vitro using a specific IGF-I kinase receptor activation (KIRA) assay. IGF-I was also measured by immunoassay together with IGF-II, IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-2.

Results

When compared with subcutaneous insulin, intraperitoneal insulin resulted in (CIPII vs CSII) higher IGF-I bioactivity (1·83 ± 0·76 vs 1·16 ± 0·24 μg/l; P = 0·02), IGF-I (120 ± 35 vs 81 ± 19 μg/l; P = 0·01) and IGF-II (1050 ± 136 vs 879 ± 110 μg/l; P = 0·02). By contrast, log-transformed IGFBP-1 was reduced (P = 0·013), whereas log-transformed IGFBP-2 was not different (P = 0·12). There was a positive correlation between IGF bioactivity and IGF-I (r = 0·69; P < 0·001) and an inverse correlation between IGF-I bioactivity and log10 IGFBP-1 (r = −0·68, P < 0·001).

Conclusion

The in vitro IGF-I bioactivity was higher in patients treated with CIPII compared with CSII supporting the theory that the route of insulin administration is of importance for the activity of the IGF system. Intraperitoneal insulin administration may therefore be beneficial by correcting the alterations of the IGF system in T1D.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104324 (URN)10.1111/cen.12296 (DOI)000337735900009 ()23865977 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-02-16 Created: 2014-02-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06
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