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Jenmalm, Maria
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 121) Show all publications
Ahlbeck, L., Ahlberg, E., Nyström Kronander, U., Björkander, J. & Jenmalm, M. (2018). Intralymphatic allergen immunotherapy against pollen allergy. A 3-year open follow-up study of 10 patients [Letter to the editor]. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 121(5), 626-627
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intralymphatic allergen immunotherapy against pollen allergy. A 3-year open follow-up study of 10 patients
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2018 (English)In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, ISSN 1081-1206, E-ISSN 1534-4436, Vol. 121, no 5, p. 626-627Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To date, allergen immunotherapy (AIT) is the only treatment that affects the long-term development of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and induces clinical tolerance primarily by stimulating regulatory T (Treg) cells, attenuating T helper 2 (Th2) responses and synthesis of blocking antibodies1. Conventional AIT with subcutaneous injections, sublingual tablets or drops is effective, but consumes time and resources 2.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Immunotherapy, Intralymphatic, Allergy, Rhinoconjunctivitis, T-cells
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150594 (URN)10.1016/j.anai.2018.07.010 (DOI)000448665400022 ()30021119 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Region Ostergotland; Allergy Center in Linkoping; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); Bergh Foundation; Asthma and Allergy Association of Sweden

Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2018-11-22Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, L., Brockow, K., Alm, J., Cardona, V., Caubet, J.-C., Gomes, E., . . . Zanoni, G. (2017). Vaccination and allergy: EAACI position paper, practical aspects. Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vaccination and allergy: EAACI position paper, practical aspects
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2017 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Immunization is highly effective in preventing infectious diseases and therefore an indispensable public health measure. Allergic patients deserve access to the same publicly recommended immunizations as nonallergic patients unless risks associated with vaccination outweigh the gains. Whereas the number of reported possible allergic reactions to vaccines is high, confirmed vaccine-triggered allergic reactions are rare. Anaphylaxis following vaccination is rare, affecting less than 1/100,000, but can occur in any patient. Some patient groups, notably those with a previous allergic reaction to a vaccine or its components, are at heightened risk of allergic reaction and require special precautions. Allergic reactions, however, may occur in patients without known risk factors and cannot be predicted by currently available tools. Unwarranted fear and uncertainty can result in incomplete vaccination coverage for children and adults with or without allergy. In addition to concerns about an allergic reaction to the vaccine itself, there is fear that routine childhood immunization may promote the development of allergic sensitization and disease. Thus, although there is no evidence that routine childhood immunization increases the risk of allergy development, such risks need to be discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2017
Keywords
adjuvant, adverse event, allergy, anaphylaxis, vaccination
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-141773 (URN)10.1111/pai.12762 (DOI)000418437400003 ()28779496 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85031118328 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-17 Created: 2017-10-17 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved
Svensson Arvelund, J., Söderberg, D., Wendel, C., Freland, S., Geffers, R., Berg, G., . . . Ernerudh, J. (2015). Decidual macrophages contribute to the unique leukocyte composition at the fetal-maternal interface by production of IL-35, induction of Treg cells and production of homeostatic chemokines.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decidual macrophages contribute to the unique leukocyte composition at the fetal-maternal interface by production of IL-35, induction of Treg cells and production of homeostatic chemokines
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2015 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Reproductive success depends on the ability of the maternal immune system to adapt in order to tolerate and support the growing semi-allogenic fetus. Macrophages, being a major leukocyte population in the uterine mucosa (decidua), may play a central role in promoting the unique composition and regulatory phenotype of leukocytes that is characteristic for the fetal-maternal interface. We show that decidual macrophages display a predominantly immune regulatory gene profile and produce the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-35 but no other members of the IL-12 family (IL-12, IL-23 and IL-27). Decidual macrophages also promoted the selective expansion of CD25highFoxp3+ Tregs but not of Tbet+ Th1, GATA-3+ Th2 and Rorγt+ Th17 cells. In addition, these macrophages preferentially secreted the monocyte- and Treg-associated chemokines CCL2 and CCL18, while Th1-, Th2- and Th17-related chemokines were produced at low levels. Among in vitro macrophages, distinct chemokine profiles were observed; IL-4/13 upregulated Th2-associated chemokines (CCL17, CCL22, CCL26) while LPS/IFNγ upregulated Th1-associated chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL10, CXCL11, CCL5). M(IL-10) macrophages (induced by M-CSF and IL-10) showed a chemokine profile similar to that of decidual macrophages, as shown by gene expression and protein analysis. By using M(IL-10) macrophages as a model of decidual macrophages, we show that these cells promote the recruitment of CD14+ monocytes, while migration of several lymphocyte populations was unaltered or prevented. These data implicate decidual macrophages as critical regulators of the decidual leukocyte composition and phenotype that is associated with successful reproduction.

National Category
Immunology Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117182 (URN)
Available from: 2015-04-21 Created: 2015-04-21 Last updated: 2018-07-18Bibliographically approved
Hales, B. J., Hizawa, N., Jenmalm, M., Sverremark-Ekstroem, E. & Wardlaw, A. J. (2015). Developments in the field of allergy in 2014 through the eyes of Clinical and Experimental Allergy. Clinical and Experimental Allergy, 45(12), 1723-1745
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developments in the field of allergy in 2014 through the eyes of Clinical and Experimental Allergy
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2015 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Allergy, ISSN 0954-7894, E-ISSN 1365-2222, Vol. 45, no 12, p. 1723-1745Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The pathogenesis of asthma continues to be a major topic of interest to our authors with reviews and original papers on the role of viruses, mechanisms of inflammation, biomarkers, and phenotypes of asthma being major topics. A number of papers described new treatments for asthma focusing on blocking the Th2 response reflecting the fact that two decades of work in this area is finally bearing fruit. The pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis is a growing area of interest, but there has been less on the genetics of airways disease than in previous years possibly reflecting the degree of rigour (and therefore a smaller body of work), with which these sorts of studies are now being undertaken. There continues to be a wide range of papers dealing with mechanisms of allergic disease ranging from clinical-based studies to basic research and the use of in vivo animal models especially mice. As before, mechanisms and new approaches to immunotherapy are common themes. Several were published in the allergens section investigating modification of allergens to increase their effectiveness and reduce the risk of adverse events. Risk factors for allergic disease was a common theme in the epidemiology section and food allergy a common theme in clinical allergy with papers on the development of protocols to induce tolerance and attempts to find biomarkers to distinguish sensitization from allergic disease. This was another exciting year for the editors, and we hope the readers of the journal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123509 (URN)10.1111/cea.12663 (DOI)000365315100003 ()26492197 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Leicester NIHR Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit

Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2017-12-01
West, C. E. & Jenmalm, M. (2015). Editorial Material: Transfer of Probiotic Bacteria From Mother to Child: A Matter of Strain Specificity? in JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY AND NUTRITION, vol 61, issue 2, pp 157-158. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, 61(2), 157-158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial Material: Transfer of Probiotic Bacteria From Mother to Child: A Matter of Strain Specificity? in JOURNAL OF PEDIATRIC GASTROENTEROLOGY AND NUTRITION, vol 61, issue 2, pp 157-158
2015 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition - JPGN, ISSN 0277-2116, E-ISSN 1536-4801, Vol. 61, no 2, p. 157-158Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS and WILKINS, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123164 (URN)10.1097/MPG.0000000000000832 (DOI)000364416000003 ()25905545 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-06 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Abrahamsson, T., You Wu, R. & Jenmalm, M. (2015). Gut microbiota and allergy: the importance of the pregnancy period. Pediatric Research, 77(1), 214-219
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gut microbiota and allergy: the importance of the pregnancy period
2015 (English)In: Pediatric Research, ISSN 0031-3998, E-ISSN 1530-0447, Vol. 77, no 1, p. 214-219Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Limited microbial exposure is suggested to underlie the increase of allergic diseases in affluent countries, and bacterial diversity seems to be more important than specific bacteria taxa. Prospective studies indicate that the gut microbiota composition during the first months of life influences allergy development, and support the theory that factors influencing the early maturation of the immune system might be important for subsequent allergic disease. However, recent research indicates that microbial exposure during pregnancy may be even more important for the preventative effects against allergic disease. This review gives a background of the epidemiology, immunology, and microbiology literature in this field. It focuses on possible underlying mechanisms such as immune-regulated epigenetic imprinting and bacterial translocation during pregnancy, potentially providing the offspring with a pioneer microbiome. We suggest that a possible reason for the initial exposure of bacterial molecular patterns to the fetus in utero is to prime the immune system and/or the epithelium to respond appropriately to pathogens and commensals after birth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group: Open Access Hybrid Model Option A, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine Microbiology in the medical area Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114252 (URN)10.1038/pr.2014.165 (DOI)000347672800016 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Biogaia AB, Sweden

Available from: 2015-02-16 Created: 2015-02-16 Last updated: 2018-02-28
von Hertzen, L., Beutler, B., Bienenstock, J., Blaser, M., Cani, P. D., Eriksson, J., . . . de Vos, W. M. (2015). Helsinki alert of biodiversity and health. Annals of Medicine, 47(3), 218-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Helsinki alert of biodiversity and health
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2015 (English)In: Annals of Medicine, ISSN 0785-3890, E-ISSN 1365-2060, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 218-225Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Urban living in built environments, combined with the use of processed water and food, may not provide the microbial stimulation necessary for a balanced development of immune function. Many chronic inflammatory disorders, including allergic, autoimmune, metabolic, and even some behavioural disorders, are linked to alteration in the human commensal microbiota. Sedentary lifestyle is associated with reduced exposure to a broad spectrum of environmental micro-organisms and surplus energy balance, both risk factors of chronic inflammatory disorders. According to the Biodiversity Hypothesis, an environment with diverse macrobiota and microbiota modifies and enriches the human microbiota, which in turn is crucial in the development and maintenance of appropriate immune function. These issues were discussed in the symposium Chronic Inflammation, Lifestyle and Environment , held in Helsinki, 20 - 22 August 2014, under the sponsorship of the Yrjo Jahnsson Foundation. This paper briefly outlines the recent findings in the context of the environment, lifestyle, and health; discusses the forces that undermine immune tolerance in urban environments; and highlights the possibilities to restore broken immune tolerance among urban dwellers, summarizing the main messages in four statements and calling for actions to combat major public health threats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Biodiversity; chronic inflammatory disease; microbiota; sedentary lifestyle; Western diet
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119806 (URN)10.3109/07853890.2015.1010226 (DOI)000355562200004 ()25904094 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-26 Created: 2015-06-26 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Christmann, B. S., Abrahamsson, T., Bernstein, C. N., Wayne Duck, L., Mannon, P. J., Berg, G., . . . Elson, C. O. (2015). Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 136(5), 1378-1386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human seroreactivity to gut microbiota antigens
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0091-6749, E-ISSN 1097-6825, Vol. 136, no 5, p. 1378-1386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although immune responses directed against antigens from the intestinal microbiota are observed in certain diseases, the normal human adaptive immune response to intestinal microbiota is poorly defined. Objective: Our goal was to assess the adaptive immune response to the intestinal microbiota present in 143 healthy adults and compare this response with the response observed in 52 children and their mothers at risk of having allergic disease. Methods: Human serum was collected from adults and children followed from birth to 7 years of age, and the serum IgG response to a panel of intestinal microbiota antigens was assessed by using a novel protein microarray. Results: Nearly every subject tested, regardless of health status, had serum IgG that recognized a common set of antigens. Seroreactivity to the panel of antigens was significantly lower in atopic adults. Healthy infants expressed the highest level of IgG seroreactivity to intestinal microbiota antigens. This adaptive response developed between 6 and 12 months of age and peaked around 2 years of age. Low IgG responses to certain clusters of microbiota antigens during infancy were associated with allergy development during childhood. Conclusions: There is an observed perturbation of the adaptive response to antigens from the microbiota in allergic subjects. These perturbations are observable even in childhood, suggesting that optimal stimulation of the adaptive immune system by the microbiota might be needed to prevent certain immune-mediated diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MOSBY-ELSEVIER, 2015
Keywords
Adaptive; atopy; allergy; childhood; IgG; microarray; microbiota; bacterial antigens; bacterial antibodies
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123148 (URN)10.1016/j.jaci.2015.03.036 (DOI)000364787200028 ()26014812 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|National Institutes of Health [DK071176]; Swedish Research Council [K2011-56X-21854-01-06]; Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation [20050514]; Ekhaga Foundation [210-53]; Research Council for the South-East Sweden; Olle Engqvist Foundation; Swedish Asthma and Allergy Association; Vardal Foundation for Health Care Science and Allergy Research, Sweden [B2007 042]; University Hospital of Linkoping, Sweden

Available from: 2015-12-07 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Boij, R., Mjosberg, J., Svensson Arvelund, J., Hjorth, M., Berg, G., Matthiesen, L., . . . Ernerudh, J. (2015). Regulatory T-cell Subpopulations in Severe or Early-onset Preeclampsia. American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, 74(4), 368-378
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulatory T-cell Subpopulations in Severe or Early-onset Preeclampsia
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2015 (English)In: American Journal of Reproductive Immunology, ISSN 1046-7408, E-ISSN 1600-0897, Vol. 74, no 4, p. 368-378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Problem A deficiency in regulatory T (Treg) cells causing reduced immune regulatory capacity has been proposed in preeclampsia. Objective Utilizing recent advances in flow cytometry phenotyping, we aimed to assess whether a deficiency of Treg subpopulations occurs in preeclampsia. Method of study Six-color flow cytometry was used for Treg phenotyping in 18 preeclamptic women (one early-onset, one severe and 16 both), 20 women with normal pregnancy, and 20 non-pregnant controls. Results No differences were found in major Treg populations including CD127(low)CD25(+)/CD127(ow)FOXP3(+), resting (FOXP3(dim)CD45RA(+)), and activated (FOXP3(bright)CD45RA(-)) Treg cells, whereas preeclamptic women showed increased CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) proportions within resting/activated Treg populations. Corticosteroid treatment prior to blood sampling (n = 10) affected the distribution of Treg populations. Conclusions Although we found no major alterations in circulating Treg frequencies, differences in CTLA-4(+) and CCR4(+) frequencies suggest a migratory defect of Treg cells in preeclampsia. Corticosteroid treatment should be taken into account when evaluating Treg cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2015
Keywords
Early-onset preeclampsia; preeclampsia; pregnancy; regulatory T cells
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122528 (URN)10.1111/aji.12410 (DOI)000362664200009 ()26118401 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|FORSS (Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden); Futurum, academy for Health and Care Jonkoping County Council, Sweden

Available from: 2015-11-09 Created: 2015-11-06 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Rodríguez, J. M., Murphy, K., Stanton, C., Ross, R. P., Kober, O. I., Juge, N., . . . Collado, M. C. (2015). The composition of the gut microbiota throughout life, with an emphasis on early life. Microbiological Ecology in Health and Disease, 26, Article ID 26050.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The composition of the gut microbiota throughout life, with an emphasis on early life
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2015 (English)In: Microbiological Ecology in Health and Disease, ISSN 0891-060X, E-ISSN 1651-2235, Vol. 26, article id 26050Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The intestinal microbiota has become a relevant aspect of human health. Microbial colonization runs in parallel with immune system maturation and plays a role in intestinal physiology and regulation. Increasing evidence on early microbial contact suggest that human intestinal microbiota is seeded before birth. Maternal microbiota forms the first microbial inoculum, and from birth, the microbial diversity increases and converges toward an adult-like microbiota by the end of the first 3-5 years of life. Perinatal factors such as mode of delivery, diet, genetics, and intestinal mucin glycosylation all contribute to influence microbial colonization. Once established, the composition of the gut microbiota is relatively stable throughout adult life, but can be altered as a result of bacterial infections, antibiotic treatment, lifestyle, surgical, and a long-term change in diet. Shifts in this complex microbial system have been reported to increase the risk of disease. Therefore, an adequate establishment of microbiota and its maintenance throughout life would reduce the risk of disease in early and late life. This review discusses recent studies on the early colonization and factors influencing this process which impact on health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
diet; gut; maternal; microbiota; neonate
National Category
Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125732 (URN)10.3402/mehd.v26.26050 (DOI)000424886700001 ()25651996 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-01 Created: 2016-03-01 Last updated: 2018-11-29
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