liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Garvin, Peter
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 31) Show all publications
Mazya, A. L., Garvin, P. & Ekdahl, A. W. (2019). Outpatient comprehensive geriatric assessment: effects on frailty and mortality in old people with multimorbidity and high health care utilization. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, 31(4), 519-525
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outpatient comprehensive geriatric assessment: effects on frailty and mortality in old people with multimorbidity and high health care utilization
2019 (English)In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 519-525Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Multimorbidity and frailty are often associated and Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is considered the gold standard of care for these patients.

AIMS: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of outpatient Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) on frailty in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity and high health care utilization.

METHODS: The Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment-Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT) was a randomized controlled trial (intervention group, n = 208, control group n = 174) with a follow-up period of 24 months. Frailty was a secondary outcome. Inclusion criteria were: age ≥ 75 years, ≥ 3 current diagnoses per ICD-10, and ≥ 3 inpatient admissions during 12 months prior to study inclusion. The intervention group received CGA-based care and tailored interventions by a multidisciplinary team in an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit, in addition to usual care. The control group received usual care. Frailty was measured with the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS) criteria. At 24 months, frail and deceased participants were combined in the analysis.

RESULTS: Ninety percent of the population were frail or pre-frail at baseline. After 24 months, there was a significant smaller proportion of frail and deceased (p = 0.002) and a significant higher proportion of pre-frail patients in the intervention group (p = 0.004). Mortality was high, 18% in the intervention group and 26% in the control group.

CONCLUSION: Outpatient CGA may delay the progression of frailty and may contribute to the improvement of frail patients in older persons with multimorbidity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Milan, Italy: Springer - Verlag Italia Srl, 2019
Keywords
Community dwelling, Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment, Frailty, Multimorbidity, Outpatient, Randomized controlled trial
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150182 (URN)10.1007/s40520-018-1004-z (DOI)30039453 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85050569790 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2019-04-12Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, O., Garvin, P., Kristenson, M., Jonasson, L. & Thylén, I. (2018). A journey through chaos and calmness: experiences of mindfulness training in patients with depressive symptoms after a recent coronary event - a qualitative diary content analysis.. BMC Psychology, 6(1), Article ID 46.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A journey through chaos and calmness: experiences of mindfulness training in patients with depressive symptoms after a recent coronary event - a qualitative diary content analysis.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 46Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Psychological distress with symptoms of depression and anxiety is common and unrecognized in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Efforts have been made to treat psychological distress in CAD with both conventional methods, such as antidepressant drugs and psychotherapy, and non-conventional methods, such as stress management courses. However, studies focusing on the experiences of mindfulness training in this population are still scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore immediate experiences of mindfulness practice among CAD patients with depressive symptoms.

METHODS: A qualitative content analysis of diary entries, written immediately after practice sessions and continuously during an 8-week long Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction course (MBSR), was applied.

RESULTS: Twelve respondents participated in the study. The main category: a journey through chaos and calmness captured the participants' concurrent experiences of challenges and rewards over time. This journey appears to reflect a progressive development culminating in the harvesting of the fruits of practice at the end of the mindfulness training. Descriptions of various challenging facets of mindfulness practice - both physical and psychological - commonly occurred during the whole course, although distressing experiences were more predominant during the first half. Furthermore, the diary entries showed a wide variety of ways of dealing with these struggles, including both constructive and less constructive strategies of facing difficult experiences. As the weeks passed, participants more frequently described an enhanced ability to concentrate, relax and deal with distractions. They also developed their capacity to observe the content of their mind and described how the practice began to yield rewards in the form of well-being and a sense of mastery.

CONCLUSIONS: Introducing MBSR in the aftermath of a cardiac event, when depressive symptoms are present, is a complex and delicate challenge in clinical practice. More nuanced information about what to expect as well as the addition of motivational support and skillful guidance during the course should be given in accordance with the participants' experiences and needs.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial was retrospectively registered in clinicaltrials.gov (registration number: NCT03340948 ).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2018
Keywords
Depressive symptoms, Mindfulness based stress reduction, Myocardial infarction, Qualitative content analysis, Unstable angina pectoris
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-153226 (URN)10.1186/s40359-018-0252-1 (DOI)30213276 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053272711 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-12-03 Created: 2018-12-03 Last updated: 2019-05-01Bibliographically approved
Lundgren, O., Garvin, P., Andersson, G., Jonasson, L. & Kristenson, M. (2018). Inverted items and validity: A psychobiological evaluation of two measures of psychological resources and one depression scale. Health psychology open, 5(1), Article ID 2055102918755045.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inverted items and validity: A psychobiological evaluation of two measures of psychological resources and one depression scale
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Health psychology open, ISSN 2055-1029, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 2055102918755045Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Psychological resources and risk factors influence risk of coronary heart disease. We evaluated whether inverted items in the Self-esteem, Mastery, and Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scales compromise validity in the context of coronary heart disease. In a population-based sample, validity was investigated by calculating correlations with other scales (n = 1004) and interleukin-6 (n = 374), and by analyzing the relationship with 8-year coronary heart disease risk (n = 1000). Negative items did not affect the validity of the resource scales. In contrast, positive items from Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression showed no significant relationships with biological variables. However, they had no major impact on the validity of the original scale.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
coronary heart disease, depressiveness, interleukin-6, mastery, self-esteem, wording effect
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146087 (URN)10.1177/2055102918755045 (DOI)29479456 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Moberg, A. B., Taleus, U., Garvin, P., Fransson, S. G. & Falk, M. (2016). Community-acquired pneumonia in primary care: clinical assessment and the usability of chest radiography. Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, 34(1), 21-27
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community-acquired pneumonia in primary care: clinical assessment and the usability of chest radiography
Show others...
2016 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 21-27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate the diagnostic value of different clinical and laboratory findings in pneumonia and to explore the association between the doctors degree of suspicion and chest X-ray (CXR) result and to evaluate whether or not CXR should be used routinely in primary care, when available. Design: A three-year prospective study was conducted between September 2011 and December 2014. Setting: Two primary care settings in Linkoping, Sweden. Subjects: A total of 103 adult patients with suspected pneumonia in primary care. Main outcome measures: The physicians recorded results of a standardized medical physical examination, including laboratory results, and rated their suspicion into three degrees. The outcome of the diagnostic variables and the degree of suspicion was compared with the result of CXR. Results: Radiographic pneumonia was reported in 45% of patients. When the physicians were sure of the diagnosis radiographic pneumonia was found in 88% of cases (p<0.001), when quite sure the frequency of positive CXR was 45%, and when not sure 28%. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP)50mg/L were associated with the presence of radiographic pneumonia when the diagnosis was suspected (p<0.001). Conclusion: This study indicates that CXR can be useful if the physician is not sure of the diagnosis, but when sure one can rely on ones judgement without ordering CXR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2016
Keywords
Chest radiography; clinical assessment; community-acquired pneumonia; C-reactive protein; general practice; primary care; Sweden
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127062 (URN)10.3109/02813432.2015.1132889 (DOI)000372023200005 ()26849394 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of ostergotland

Available from: 2016-04-13 Created: 2016-04-13 Last updated: 2018-03-19
Garvin, P., Nilsson, E., Ernerudh, J. & Kristenson, M. (2016). The joint subclinical elevation of CRP and IL-6 is associated with lower health-related quality of life in comparison with no elevation or elevation of only one of the biomarkers. Quality of Life Research, 25(1), 213-221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The joint subclinical elevation of CRP and IL-6 is associated with lower health-related quality of life in comparison with no elevation or elevation of only one of the biomarkers
2016 (English)In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 213-221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQoL), like the Short Form (SF)-36, have been suggested to correlate with inflammatory biomarkers. It is, however, unclear whether a joint measure of two inflammatory biomarkers would bring additional information in comparison with evaluation of one inflammatory biomarker. To evaluate associations between SF-36 and low-grade inflammation in a Swedish population, with emphasis on a combined measure of C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a proxy for low-grade inflammation. In a randomly selected sample of a middle-aged Swedish general population (n = 905; aged 45-69 years, 50 % women), relations between SF-36 parameters and the biomarkers were tested. Regression and correlation analyses were adjusted for sex, age, presence of disease, lifestyle, and psychological factors. After adjustment for sex and age, HRQoL was significantly lower in the group with a joint elevation of CRP and IL-6 in comparison with either the group with no elevation or the groups showing elevation of one of the two biomarkers. Also after full adjustments, the combined measure of elevated CRP and IL-6, with few exceptions, was associated with significantly lower HRQoL in comparison with elevations in one of them, difference ranging from 4 (Mental Health scale) to 18 scale steps (Role-Physical scale). This study confirms that there is a relationship between HRQoL and low-grade inflammation. In particular, SF-36 scores are significantly lower in a group with joint elevation of IL-6 and CRP, in comparison with elevation of either one of them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2016
Keywords
Biomarkers; CRP; Health-related quality of life; Inflammation; Interleukin; Population; SF-36
National Category
Sociology Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124641 (URN)10.1007/s11136-015-1068-6 (DOI)000367896300023 ()26195318 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2004-1881]; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation [2004053]

Available from: 2016-02-08 Created: 2016-02-08 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Granström, F., Molarius, A., Garvin, P., Elo, S., Feldman, I. & Kristenson, M. (2015). Exploring trends in and determinants of educational inequalities in self-rated health. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 43(7), 677-686
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring trends in and determinants of educational inequalities in self-rated health
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 43, no 7, p. 677-686Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Educational inequalities in self-rated health (SRH) in European welfare countries are documented, but recent trends in these inequalities are less well understood. We examined educational inequalities in SRH in different age groups, and the contribution of selected material, behavioural and psychosocial determinants from 2000 to 2008. Methods: Data were derived from cross-sectional surveys conducted in 2000, 2004 and 2008 including 37,478, 34,876 and 32,982 respondents, respectively, aged 25-75 in mid-Sweden. Inequalities were analysed by age-standardized and age-stratified rate ratios of poor SRH and age-standardized prevalence of determinants, and contribution of determinants by age-adjusted logistic regression. Results: Relative educational inequalities in SRH increased among women from 2000 (rate ratio (RR) 1.70, 95% CI 1.55-1.85) to 2008 (RR 2.07, 95% CI 1.90-2.26), but were unchanged among men (RR 1.91-2.01). The increase among women was mainly due to growing inequalities in the age group 25-34 years. In 2008, significant age differences emerged with larger inequalities in the youngest compared with the oldest age group in both genders. All determinants were more prevalent in low educational groups; the most prominent were lack of a financial buffer, smoking and low optimism. Educational differences were unchanged over the years for most determinants. In all three surveys, examined determinants together explained a substantial part of the educational inequalities in SRH. Conclusions: Increased relative educational health inequalities among women, and persisting inequalities among men, were paralleled by unchanged, large differences in material/structural, behavioural and psychosocial factors. Interventions to reduce these inequalities need to focus on early mid-life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2015
Keywords
Health status disparities; social medicine; socioeconomic factors; educational status
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122099 (URN)10.1177/1403494815592271 (DOI)000361768900002 ()26138729 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Centre for Clinical Research Sormland, Uppsala University; Sormland County Council, Sweden; County Council of Vastmanland; County Council of Uppsala; County Council of Sormland; County Council of Orebro; County Council of Varmland

Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Garvin, P., Jonasson, L., Nilsson, L., Falk, M. & Kristenson, M. (2015). Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Levels Predict First-Time Coronary Heart Disease: An 8-Year Follow-Up of a Community-Based Middle Aged Population. PLoS ONE, 10(9), e0138290
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Levels Predict First-Time Coronary Heart Disease: An 8-Year Follow-Up of a Community-Based Middle Aged Population
Show others...
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 9, p. e0138290-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The enzyme in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 has been suggested to be an important determinant of plaque degradation. While several studies have shown elevated levels in patients with coronary heart disease, results in prospective population based studies evaluating MMP-9 in relation to first time coronary events have been inconclusive. As of today, there are four published studies which have measured MMP-9 in serum and none using plasma. Measures of MMP-9 in serum have been suggested to have more flaws than measures in plasma. Aim To investigate the independent association between plasma levels of MMP-9 and first-time incidence of coronary events in an 8-year follow-up. Material and Methods 428 men and 438 women, aged 45-69 years, free of previous coronary events and stroke at baseline, were followed-up. Adjustments were made for sex, age, socioeconomic position, behavioral and cardiovascular risk factors, chronic disease at baseline, depressive symptoms, interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein. Results 53 events were identified during a risk-time of 6 607 person years. Hazard ratio (HR) for MMP-9 after adjustment for all covariates were HR = 1.44 (1.03 to 2.02, p = 0.033). Overall, the effect of adjustments for other cardiovascular risk factors was low. Conclusion Levels of plasma MMP-9 are independently associated with risk of first-time CHD events, regardless of adjustments. These results are in contrast to previous prospective population-based studies based on MMP-9 in serum. It is essential that more studies look at MMP-9 levels in plasma to further evaluate the association with first coronary events.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122112 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0138290 (DOI)000361791000022 ()26389803 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2004-1881]; Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation [2004053]

Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Lundgren, O., Garvin, P., Jonasson, L., Andersson, G. & Kristenson, M. (2014). Psychological Resources are Associated with Reduced Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease: An 8-Year Follow-up of a Community-Based Swedish Sample. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 22(1), 77-84
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological Resources are Associated with Reduced Incidence of Coronary Heart Disease: An 8-Year Follow-up of a Community-Based Swedish Sample
Show others...
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 77-84Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

A large number of studies have provided clear evidence for a link between the risk of coronary heart disease and psychological risk factors. Much less attention has been given to the potential protective effect of psychological resources.

Purpose

The major aim of this study was to investigate the independent association between psychological resources and incidence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in an 8-year follow-up study of a Swedish community-based cohort.

Methods

The cohort consisted of 484 men and 497 women, aged 45–69 years at baseline. The incidence of first-time major event of CHD was analysed in relation to baseline levels of psychological resources, including mastery, self-esteem, and sense of coherence as well as psychological risk factors including cynicism and hostile affect, vital exhaustion, hopelessness, and depressive symptoms. In Cox proportional hazard models, adjustments were made for age, sex, eight traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and depressive symptoms.

Results

A total of 56 CHD events had occurred after the 8-year follow-up. After adjustment for age, sex, and eight traditional risk factors, a significantly decreased risk of CHD was found for mastery (HR 0.62 per SD, p = 0.003), self-esteem (HR 0.64, p = 0.004), and sense of coherence (HR 0.70, p = 0.031). An increased risk of CHD was found for vital exhaustion (HR 1.46, p = 0.014), hopelessness (HR 1.59, p = 0.003), and depressive symptoms (HR 1.45, p = 0.009). After further adjustment for depressive symptoms, significant associations remained for mastery (HR 0.67, p = 0.034), self-esteem (HR 0.69, p = 0.048), and hopelessness (HR 1.48, p = 0.023).

Conclusions

The psychological resources, mastery and self-esteem, showed robust protective effects on CHD, also after adjustment for established risk factors as well as depressive symptoms. In parallel, hopelessness was an independent risk factor for CHD. The results may have implications for novel approaches in preventive efforts

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2014
Keywords
Mastery, Self-esteem, Sense of coherence, Hopelessness, Psychosocial, Coronary heart disease, Myocardial infarction
National Category
Clinical Medicine Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108566 (URN)10.1007/s12529-014-9387-5 (DOI)000349011500009 ()24430130 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-06-30 Created: 2014-06-30 Last updated: 2018-06-08Bibliographically approved
Lönn, J., Starkhammar Johansson, C., Kälvegren, H., Brudin, L., Skoglund, C., Garvin, P., . . . Nayeri, F. (2012). Hepatocyte growth factor in patients with coronary artery disease and its relation to periodontal condition. Results in Immunology, 2, 7-12
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hepatocyte growth factor in patients with coronary artery disease and its relation to periodontal condition
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Results in Immunology, ISSN 2211-2839, Vol. 2, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is an angiogenic, cardioprotective factor important for tissue and vascular repair. High levels of HGF are associated with chronic inflammatory diseases, such as coronary artery disease (CAD) and periodontitis, and are suggested as a marker of the ongoing atherosclerotic event in patients with CAD. Periodontal disease is more prevalent among patients with CAD than among healthy people. Recent studies indicate a reduced biological activity of HGF in different chronic inflammatory conditions. Biologically active HGF has high affinity to heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) on cell-membrane and extracellular matrix. The aim of the study was to investigate the serum concentration and the biological activity of HGF with ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), respectively, before and at various time points after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with CAD, and to examine the relationship with periodontal condition. The periodontal status of the CAD patients was examined, and the presence of P. gingivalis in periodontal pockets was analyzed with PCR. The HGF concentration was significantly higher, at all time-points, in patients with CAD compared to the age-matched controls (P< 0.001), but was independent of periodontal status. The HGF concentration and the affinity to HSPG adversely fluctuated over time, and the biological activity increased one month after intervention in patients without periodontitis. We conclude that elevated concentration of HGF but with reduced biological activity might indicate a chronic inflammatory profile in patients with CAD and periodontitis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86207 (URN)10.1016/j.rinim.2011.12.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2012-12-11 Created: 2012-12-11 Last updated: 2014-09-10
Rydén, M., Garvin, P., Kristenson, M., Leanderson, P., Ernerudh, J. & Jonasson, L. (2012). Provitamin A carotenoids are independently associated with matrix metalloproteinase-9 in plasma samples from a general population. Journal of Internal Medicine, 272(4), 371-384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Provitamin A carotenoids are independently associated with matrix metalloproteinase-9 in plasma samples from a general population
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 272, no 4, p. 371-384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aim:  Carotenoids in plasma are inversely associated with cardiovascular risk. Low levels can be explained by low dietary intake but also by a number of other factors including inflammatory activity. Given that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 has an important role in inflammation and cardiovascular disease, we hypothesized that circulating MMP-9 levels would be inversely related to total or single carotenoids in a general population cohort. Methods:  A well-characterized population-based cohort of 285 Swedish men and women (45-69 years) was used for the present study. The intake of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables was estimated from a food frequency questionnaire. Levels of MMP-9, C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6 and six major carotenoids [β-cryptoxanthine, α-carotene, β-carotene, lutein (+ zeaxanthin) and lycopene] were determined in plasma. Results:  Lower plasma levels of total and single carotenoids were associated with lower dietary intake of carotenoids, older age, male sex, lower physical activity, higher alcohol consumption, higher body mass index (BMI), higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures, lower levels of total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol and higher levels of CRP, IL-6 and MMP-9. After multivariate adjustments, plasma levels of total carotenoids and provitamin A carotenoids (β-cryptoxanthine, α-carotene and β-carotene) remained independently associated with sex, dietary intake of carotenoids, BMI, HDL cholesterol and MMP-9, while associations with CRP and IL-6 were not maintained. Neither dietary intake of carotenoid-rich fruits and vegetables, nor vitamin supplement use was associated with MMP-9, CRP or IL-6 levels. Conclusion:  Plasma carotenoids were associated with a variety of factors including age, sex, dietary intake and metabolic variables. A new finding was the independent relationship in plasma between low provitamin A carotenoids and high MMP-9, suggesting a link between these carotenoids, matrix turnover and arterial remodelling. © 2012 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2012
Keywords
CMOS, photon counting, spectral computed tomography, x-ray detection
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75982 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2796.2012.2534x.x (DOI)000308877500005 ()22372952 (PubMedID)
Note

funding agencies|Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation||Swedish Research Council||Linkoping University||

Available from: 2012-03-21 Created: 2012-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications