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Lunner, Thomas
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Publications (10 of 227) Show all publications
Alickovic, E., Lunner, T. & Gustafsson, F. (2016). A System Identification Approach to Determining Listening Attention from EEG Signals. In: 2016 24TH EUROPEAN SIGNAL PROCESSING CONFERENCE (EUSIPCO): . Paper presented at 24th European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO), Aug 28-Sep 2, 2016. Budapest, Hungary (pp. 31-35). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A System Identification Approach to Determining Listening Attention from EEG Signals
2016 (English)In: 2016 24TH EUROPEAN SIGNAL PROCESSING CONFERENCE (EUSIPCO), IEEE , 2016, p. 31-35Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We still have very little knowledge about how ourbrains decouple different sound sources, which is known assolving the cocktail party problem. Several approaches; includingERP, time-frequency analysis and, more recently, regression andstimulus reconstruction approaches; have been suggested forsolving this problem. In this work, we study the problem ofcorrelating of EEG signals to different sets of sound sources withthe goal of identifying the single source to which the listener isattending. Here, we propose a method for finding the number ofparameters needed in a regression model to avoid overlearning,which is necessary for determining the attended sound sourcewith high confidence in order to solve the cocktail party problem.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2016
Series
European Signal Processing Conference, ISSN 2076-1465
Keyword
attention, cocktail party, linear regression (LR), finite impulse response (FIR), multivariable model, sound, EEG
National Category
Control Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130732 (URN)10.1109/EUSIPCO.2016.7760204 (DOI)000391891900007 ()978-0-9928-6265-7 (ISBN)978-1-5090-1891-8 (ISBN)
Conference
24th European Signal Processing Conference (EUSIPCO), Aug 28-Sep 2, 2016. Budapest, Hungary
Available from: 2016-08-22 Created: 2016-08-22 Last updated: 2017-02-15
Borch Petersen, E., Lunner, T., Vestergaard, M. & Sundewall Thorén, E. (2016). Danish Reading Span data from 283 hearing-aid users, including a sub-group analysis of their relationship to speech-in-noise performance. International Journal of Audiology, 55(4), 254-261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Danish Reading Span data from 283 hearing-aid users, including a sub-group analysis of their relationship to speech-in-noise performance
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 254-261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study provides descriptive statistics of the Danish reading span (RS) test for hearing-impaired adults. The combined effect of hearing loss, RS score, and age on speech-in-noise performance in different spatial settings was evaluated in a subset of participants. Design: Data from published and unpublished studies were re-analysed. Data regarding speech-in-noise performance with co-located or spatially separated sound sources were available for a subset of participants. Study sample: RS scores from 283 hearing-impaired participants were extracted from past studies, and 239 of these participants had completed a speech-in-noise test. Results: RS scores (mean = 41.91%, standard deviation = 11.29%) were related to age (p <0.01), but not pure-tone average (PTA) (p = 0.29). Speech-in-noise performance for co-located sound sources was related to PTA and RS score (both p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.226). Performance for spatially separated sounds was related to PTA (p < 0.01, adjusted R-squared = 0.10) but not RS score (p = 0.484). We found no differences between the standardized coefficients of the two regression models. Conclusions: The distribution of RS scores indicated a high test difficulty. We found that age should be controlled when RS scores are compared across populations. The experimental setup of the speech-in-noise test may influence the relationship between performance and RS score.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keyword
Reading span; hearing impairment; spatially distributed vs. co-located sound sources; speech-in-noise; working memory
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126496 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2015.1125533 (DOI)000371744400008 ()26836955 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Pichora-Fuller, K. M., Kramer, S. E., Eckert, M. A., Edwards, B., Hornsby, B. W. Y., Humes, L. E., . . . Wingfield, A. (2016). Hearing Impairment and Cognitive Energy: The Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening (FUEL). Ear and Hearing, 37, 5S-27S
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hearing Impairment and Cognitive Energy: The Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening (FUEL)
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2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, p. 5S-27SArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Fifth Eriksholm Workshop on "Hearing Impairment and Cognitive Energy" was convened to develop a consensus among interdisciplinary experts about what is known on the topic, gaps in knowledge, the use of terminology, priorities for future research, and implications for practice. The general term cognitive energy was chosen to facilitate the broadest possible discussion of the topic. It goes back to Titchener (1908) who described the effects of attention on perception; he used the term psychic energy for the notion that limited mental resources can be flexibly allocated among perceptual and mental activities. The workshop focused on three main areas: (1) theories, models, concepts, definitions, and frameworks; (2) methods and measures; and (3) knowledge translation. We defined effort as the deliberate allocation of mental resources to overcome obstacles in goal pursuit when carrying out a task, with listening effort applying more specifically when tasks involve listening. We adapted Kahnemans seminal (1973) Capacity Model of Attention to listening and proposed a heuristically useful Framework for Understanding Effortful Listening (FUEL). Our FUEL incorporates the well-known relationship between cognitive demand and the supply of cognitive capacity that is the foundation of cognitive theories of attention. Our FUEL also incorporates a motivation dimension based on complementary theories of motivational intensity, adaptive gain control, and optimal performance, fatigue, and pleasure. Using a three-dimensional illustration, we highlight how listening effort depends not only on hearing difficulties and task demands but also on the listeners motivation to expend mental effort in the challenging situations of everyday life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2016
Keyword
Attention; Autonomic nervous system; Cognitive capacity; Cognitive energy; Effortful listening; Executive function; Fatigue; Listening effort; Hearing impairment; Motivation; Neuroeconomics; Stress; Working memory
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130391 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000312 (DOI)000379372100002 ()27355771 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Oticon Foundation

Available from: 2016-08-15 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Ingo, E., Brännström, K. J., Andersson, G., Lunner, T. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2016). Measuring motivation using the transtheoretical (stages of change) model: A follow-up study of people who failed an online hearing screening.. International Journal of Audiology, 55(Suppl 3), S52-S58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measuring motivation using the transtheoretical (stages of change) model: A follow-up study of people who failed an online hearing screening.
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2016 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 55, no Suppl 3, p. S52-S58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Acceptance and readiness to seek professional help have shown to be important factors for favourable audiological rehabilitation outcomes. Theories from health psychology such as the transtheoretical (stages-of-change) model could help understand behavioural change in people with hearing impairment. In recent studies, the University of Rhode Island change assessment (URICA) has been found to have good predictive validity.

DESIGN: In a previous study, 224 Swedish adults who had failed an online hearing screening completed URICA and two other measures of stages of change. This follow-up aimed to: (1) determine prevalence of help-seeking at a hearing clinic and hearing aid uptake, and (2) explore the predictive validity of the stages of change measures by a follow-up on the 224 participants who had failed a hearing screening 18 months previously.

STUDY SAMPLE: A total of 122 people (54%) completed the follow-up online questionnaire, including the three measures and questions regarding experience with hearing help-seeking and hearing aid uptake.

RESULTS: Since failing the online hearing screening, 61% of participants had sought help. A good predictive validity for a one-item measure of stages of change was reported.

CONCLUSIONS: The Staging algorithm was the stages of change measure with the best ability to predict help-seeking 18 months later.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130826 (URN)10.1080/14992027.2016.1182650 (DOI)000381035200007 ()27206679 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2009-0055]

Available from: 2016-08-26 Created: 2016-08-26 Last updated: 2018-03-21Bibliographically approved
Wang, Y., Zekveld, A., Naylor, G., Ohlenforst, B., Jansma, E. P., Lorens, A., . . . Kramer, S. E. (2016). Parasympathetic Nervous System Dysfunction, as Identified by Pupil Light Reflex, and Its Possible Connection to Hearing Impairment. PLoS ONE, 11(4), e0153566
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parasympathetic Nervous System Dysfunction, as Identified by Pupil Light Reflex, and Its Possible Connection to Hearing Impairment
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2016 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 4, p. e0153566-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Context Although the pupil light reflex has been widely used as a clinical diagnostic tool for autonomic nervous system dysfunction, there is no systematic review available to summarize the evidence that the pupil light reflex is a sensitive method to detect parasympathetic dysfunction. Meanwhile, the relationship between parasympathetic functioning and hearing impairment is relatively unknown. Objectives To 1) review the evidence for the pupil light reflex being a sensitive method to evaluate parasympathetic dysfunction, 2) review the evidence relating hearing impairment and parasympathetic activity and 3) seek evidence of possible connections between hearing impairment and the pupil light reflex. Methods Literature searches were performed in five electronic databases. All selected articles were categorized into three sections: pupil light reflex and parasympathetic dysfunction, hearing impairment and parasympathetic activity, pupil light reflex and hearing impairment. Results Thirty-eight articles were included in this review. Among them, 36 articles addressed the pupil light reflex and parasympathetic dysfunction. We summarized the information in these data according to different types of parasympathetic-related diseases. Most of the studies showed a difference on at least one pupil light reflex parameter between patients and healthy controls. Two articles discussed the relationship between hearing impairment and parasympathetic activity. Both studies reported a reduced parasympathetic activity in the hearing impaired groups. The searches identified no results for pupil light reflex and hearing impairment. Discussion and Conclusions As the first systematic review of the evidence, our findings suggest that the pupil light reflex is a sensitive tool to assess the presence of parasympathetic dysfunction. Maximum constriction velocity and relative constriction amplitude appear to be the most sensitive parameters. There are only two studies investigating the relationship between parasympathetic activity and hearing impairment, hence further research is needed. The pupil light reflex could be a candidate measurement tool to achieve this goal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2016
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128960 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0153566 (DOI)000374527000026 ()27089436 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|LISTEN [607373]

Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Ellis, R., Molander, P., Rönnberg, J., Lyxell, B., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2016). Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study. Ear and Hearing, 37(1), 73-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting Speech-in-Noise Recognition from Performance on the Trail Making Test: Results from a Large-Scale Internet Study
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2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 73-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the study was to investigate the utility of an internet-based version of the trail making test (TMT) to predict performance on a speech-in-noise perception task.

Design: Data were taken from a sample of 1509 listeners aged between 18 and 91 years old. Participants completed computerized versions of the TMT and an adaptive speech-in-noise recognition test. All testing was conducted via the internet.

Results: The results indicate that better performance on both the simple and complex subtests of the TMT are associated with better speech-in-noise recognition scores. Thirty-eight percent of the participants had scores on the speech-in-noise test that indicated the presence of a hearing loss.

Conclusions: The findings suggest that the TMT may be a useful tool in the assessment, and possibly the treatment, of speech-recognition difficulties. The results indicate that the relation between speech-in-noise recognition and TMT performance relates both to the capacity of the TMT to index processing speed and to the more complex cognitive abilities also implicated in TMT performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
Keyword
Cognition, Internet screening, Speech-in-noise perception, Trail making test
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123218 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000218 (DOI)000367343400008 ()26317162 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research (Forte) [2009-0055]

Available from: 2015-12-08 Created: 2015-12-08 Last updated: 2017-05-03
Rudner, M., Mishra, S., Stenfelt, S., Lunner, T. & Rönnberg, J. (2016). Seeing the talker’s face improves free recall of speech for young adults with normal hearing but not older adults with hearing loss. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 59, 590-599
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seeing the talker’s face improves free recall of speech for young adults with normal hearing but not older adults with hearing loss
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, ISSN 1092-4388, E-ISSN 1558-9102, Vol. 59, p. 590-599Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose Seeing the talker's face improves speech understanding in noise, possibly releasing resources for cognitive processing. We investigated whether it improves free recall of spoken two-digit numbers.

Method Twenty younger adults with normal hearing and 24 older adults with hearing loss listened to and subsequently recalled lists of 13 two-digit numbers, with alternating male and female talkers. Lists were presented in quiet as well as in stationary and speech-like noise at a signal-to-noise ratio giving approximately 90% intelligibility. Amplification compensated for loss of audibility.

Results Seeing the talker's face improved free recall performance for the younger but not the older group. Poorer performance in background noise was contingent on individual differences in working memory capacity. The effect of seeing the talker's face did not differ in quiet and noise.

Conclusions We have argued that the absence of an effect of seeing the talker's face for older adults with hearing loss may be due to modulation of audiovisual integration mechanisms caused by an interaction between task demands and participant characteristics. In particular, we suggest that executive task demands and interindividual executive skills may play a key role in determining the benefit of seeing the talker's face during a speech-based cognitive task

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126019 (URN)10.1044/2015_JSLHR-H-15-0014 (DOI)000386781500016 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2007-0788].

The previous status of this article was Manuscript and the working title was Updating ability reduces the negative effect of noise on memory of speech for persons with age-related hearing loss.

Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-11 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Brännström, J., Öberg, M., Ingo, E., Månsson, K. N., Andersson, G., Lunner, T. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2016). The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients. Internet Interventions, 4(1), 82-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients
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2016 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126519 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2016.01.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Lunner, T., Rudner, M., Rosenbom, T., Ågren, J. & Ning Ng, E. H. (2016). Using Speech Recall in Hearing Aid Fitting and Outcome Evaluation Under Ecological Test Conditions. Ear and Hearing, 37(1), 145S-154S
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using Speech Recall in Hearing Aid Fitting and Outcome Evaluation Under Ecological Test Conditions
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2016 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 145S-154SArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In adaptive Speech Reception Threshold (SRT) tests used in the audiological clinic, speech is presented at signal to noise ratios (SNRs) that are lower than those generally encountered in real-life communication situations. At higher, ecologically valid SNRs, however, SRTs are insensitive to changes in hearing aid signal processing that may be of benefit to listeners who are hard of hearing. Previous studies conducted in Swedish using the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall test (SWIR) have indicated that at such SNRs, the ability to recall spoken words may be a more informative measure. In the present study, a Danish version of SWIR, known as the Sentence-final Word Identification and Recall Test in a New Language (SWIRL) was introduced and evaluated in two experiments. The objective of experiment 1 was to determine if the Swedish results demonstrating benefit from noise reduction signal processing for hearing aid wearers could be replicated in 25 Danish participants with mild to moderate symmetrical sensorineural hearing loss. The objective of experiment 2 was to compare direct-drive and skin-drive transmission in 16 Danish users of bone-anchored hearing aids with conductive hearing loss or mixed sensorineural and conductive hearing loss. In experiment 1, performance on SWIRL improved when hearing aid noise reduction was used, replicating the Swedish results and generalizing them across languages. In experiment 2, performance on SWIRL was better for direct-drive compared with skin-drive transmission conditions. These findings indicate that spoken word recall can be used to identify benefits from hearing aid signal processing at ecologically valid, positive SNRs where SRTs are insensitive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
Keyword
WORKING-MEMORY; OLDER-ADULTS; RECEPTION THRESHOLD; COGNITIVE FUNCTION; LISTENING EFFORT; NOISE-REDUCTION; INTELLIGIBILITY; BENEFIT; QUIET; SOUND
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126497 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000294 (DOI)000379372100017 ()
External cooperation:
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Lunner, T. (2015). About Cognitive Outcome Measures at Ecological Signal-to-Noise Ratios and Cognitive-Driven Hearing Aid Signal Processing. American Journal of Audiology, 24(2), 121-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>About Cognitive Outcome Measures at Ecological Signal-to-Noise Ratios and Cognitive-Driven Hearing Aid Signal Processing
2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 121-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss 2 questions concerning how hearing aids interact with hearing and cognition: Can signal processing in hearing aids improve memory? Can attention be used for top-down control of hearing aids? Method: Memory recall of sentences, presented at 95% correct speech recognition, was assessed with and without binary mask noise reduction. A short literature review was performed on recent findings on new brain-imaging techniques showing potential for hearing aid control. Conclusions: Two experiments indicate that it is possible to show improved memory with an experimental noise reduction algorithm at ecological signal-to-noise ratios and that it is possible to replicate these findings in a new language. The literature indicates that attention-controlled hearing aids may be developed in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2015
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120660 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0066 (DOI)000358354700014 ()25863715 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-20 Created: 2015-08-20 Last updated: 2018-01-11
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