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Carlbring, Per
Publications (10 of 83) Show all publications
Lindh-Åstrand, L., Spetz, A.-C., Sydsjö, G., Andersson, G., Carlbring, P. & Nedstrand, E. (2015). Internet-delivered applied relaxation for vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women: Lessons from a failed trial.. Maturitas, 80(4), 432-434.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-delivered applied relaxation for vasomotor symptoms in postmenopausal women: Lessons from a failed trial.
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2015 (English)In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 80, no 4, 432-434 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Internet-delivered therapies have a short history and promising results have been shown for several health problems, particularly for psychiatric conditions. This study was a first attempt to evaluate whether Internet-delivered applied relaxation for hot flushes in postmenopausal women may be useful. Due to a high drop-out rate the study was prematurely terminated after inclusion of approximately two thirds of calculated women. The Internet-delivered applied relaxation must probably be modified for such populations and settings before it can be used further. This article will discuss the benefits and pitfalls to learn in order to meet the challenges of future studies.

Keyword
Applied relaxation; Failed trial; Hot flushes; Internet-delivered therapy; Menopause; RCT
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116334 (URN)10.1016/j.maturitas.2015.01.010 (DOI)000353085900014 ()25700856 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-31 Created: 2015-03-25 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Rozental, A., Forsell, E., Svensson, A., Forsström, D., Andersson, G. & Carlbring, P. (2014). Psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the pure procrastination scale, the irrational procrastination scale, and the susceptibility to temptation scale in a clinical population.. BMC Psychology, 2(1), 54.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the pure procrastination scale, the irrational procrastination scale, and the susceptibility to temptation scale in a clinical population.
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2014 (English)In: BMC Psychology, E-ISSN 2050-7283, Vol. 2, no 1, 54- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Procrastination is a prevalent self-regulatory failure associated with stress and anxiety, decreased well-being, and poorer performance in school as well as work. One-fifth of the adult population and half of the student population describe themselves as chronic and severe procrastinators. However, despite the fact that it can become a debilitating condition, valid and reliable self-report measures for assessing the occurrence and severity of procrastination are lacking, particularly for use in a clinical context. The current study explored the usefulness of the Swedish version of three Internet-administered self-report measures for evaluating procrastination; the Pure Procrastination Scale, the Irrational Procrastination Scale, and the Susceptibility to Temptation Scale, all having good psychometric properties in English.

METHODS: In total, 710 participants were recruited for a clinical trial of Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for procrastination. All of the participants completed the scales as well as self-report measures of depression, anxiety, and quality of life. Principal Component Analysis was performed to assess the factor validity of the scales, and internal consistency and correlations between the scales were also determined. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient, Minimal Detectable Change, and Standard Error of Measurement were calculated for the Irrational Procrastination Scale.

RESULTS: The Swedish version of the scales have a similar factor structure as the English version, generated good internal consistencies, with Cronbach's α ranging between .76 to .87, and were moderately to highly intercorrelated. The Irrational Procrastination Scale had an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient of .83, indicating excellent reliability. Furthermore, Standard Error of Measurement was 1.61, and Minimal Detectable Change was 4.47, suggesting that a change of almost five points on the scale is necessary to determine a reliable change in self-reported procrastination severity.

CONCLUSIONS: The current study revealed that the Pure Procrastination Scale, the Irrational Procrastination Scale, and the Susceptibility to Temptation Scale are both valid and reliable from a psychometric perspective, and that they might be used for assessing the occurrence and severity of procrastination via the Internet.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: The current study is part of a clinical trial assessing the efficacy of Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for procrastination, and was registered 04/22/2013 on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01842945).

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117124 (URN)10.1186/s40359-014-0054-z (DOI)25566392 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-04-16 Created: 2015-04-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Andersson, G., Hesser, H., Hummerdal, D., Bergman Nordgren, L. & Carlbring, P. (2013). A 3.5-year follow-up of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for major depression. Journal of Mental Health, 22(2), 155-164.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 3.5-year follow-up of Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy for major depression
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 22, no 2, 155-164 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundInternet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy (ICBT) for major depression has been tested in several trials, but only with follow-ups up to 1.5 years.

AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of ICBT 3.5 years after treatment completion.Methods

A total of 88 people with major depression were randomized to either guided self-help or e-mail therapy in the original trial. One-third was initially on a waiting-list. Treatment was provided for eight weeks and in this report long-term follow-up data were collected. Also included were data from post-treatment and six-month follow-up. A total of 58% (51/88) completed the 3.5-year follow-up. Analyses were performed using a random effects repeated measures piecewise growth model to estimate trajectory shape over time and account for missing data.

ResultsResults showed continued lowered scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). No differences were found between the treatment conditions. A large proportion of participants (55%) had sought and received additional treatments in the follow-up period. A majority (56.9%) of participants had a BDI score lower than 10 at the 3.5-year follow-up.

ConclusionsPeople with mild to moderate major depression may benefit from ICBT 3.5-years after treatment completion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Informa Healthcare, 2013
Keyword
internet treatment, major depression, e-mail therapy, guided self-help
National Category
Psychology Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78771 (URN)10.3109/09638237.2011.608747 (DOI)000317496600007 ()
Available from: 2012-06-20 Created: 2012-06-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Carlbring, P., Lindner, P., Martell, C., Hassmén, P., Forsberg, L., Ström, L. & Andersson, G. (2013). The effects on depression of Internet-administered behavioural activation and physical exercise with treatment rationale and relapse prevention: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials, 14(35).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects on depression of Internet-administered behavioural activation and physical exercise with treatment rationale and relapse prevention: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
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2013 (English)In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, E-ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 14, no 35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Despite their potential as low-threshold, low-cost and high-flexibility treatments of depression, behavioural activation and physical exercise have not yet been directly compared. This study will examine the effects of these interventions, administered via the Internet. The added effect of providing a treatment rationale will also be studied, as well as a relapse prevention program featuring cognitive behavioural therapy components.

Methods/Design

This randomised controlled trial will include 500 participants meeting the diagnostic criteria for major depression, recruited in multiple cycles and randomised to either a waiting list control group with delayed treatment, or one of the four treatment groups: (1) physical exercise without a clear treatment rationale; (2) physical exercise with treatment rationale; (3) behavioural activation with treatment rationale; or (4) behavioural activation without a clear treatment rationale. Post treatment, half of the participants will be offered a relapse prevention program. Primary outcome measure will be the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item. Secondary measures include diagnostic criteria for depression, as well as self-reported anxiety, physical activity and quality of life. Measurements - done via telephone and the Internet - will be collected pre-treatment, weekly during treatment period, immediately post treatment and then monthly during a 24-month follow-up period.

Discussion

The results of this study will constitute an important contribution to the body of knowledge of the respective interventions. Limitations are discussed.

Trial registration

ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01619930

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2013
Keyword
Depression, Behavioural activation, Physical exercise, Treatment rationale, Relapse prevention, Internet-administered
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-90203 (URN)10.1186/1745-6215-14-35 (DOI)000315119400001 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research|2011-0477|

Available from: 2013-03-28 Created: 2013-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Hesser, H., Gustafsson, T., Lundén, C., Henrikson, O., Fattahi, K., Johnsson, E., . . . Andersson, G. (2012). A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 80(4), 649-661.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Randomized Controlled Trial of Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Treatment of Tinnitus
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, ISSN 0022-006X, E-ISSN 1939-2117, Vol. 80, no 4, 649-661 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Our aim in this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects on global tinnitus severity of 2 Internet-delivered psychological treatments, acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), in guided self-help format. Method: Ninety-nine participants (mean age = 48.5 years; 43% female) who were significantly distressed by tinnitus were recruited from the community. Participants were randomly assigned to CBT (n = 32), ACT (n = 35), or a control condition (monitored Internet discussion forum; n = 32), and they were assessed with standardized self-report measures (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; Quality of Life Inventory; Perceived Stress Scale; Tinnitus Acceptance Questionnaire) at pre-, posttreatment (8 weeks), and 1-year follow-up. Results: Mixed-effects linear regression analysis of all randomized participants showed significant effects on the primary outcome (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory) for CBT and for ACT compared with control at posttreatment (95% CI [-17.03, -2.94], d = 0.70, and 95% CI [-16.29, -2.53], d = 0.68, respectively). Within-group effects were substantial from pretreatment through 1-year-follow-up for both treatments (95% CI [-44.65, -20.45], d = 1.34), with no significant difference between treatments (95% CI [-14.87, 11.21], d = 0.16). Conclusions: Acceptance-based procedures may be a viable alternative to traditional CBT techniques in the management of tinnitus. The Internet can improve access to psychological interventions for tinnitus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Washington, DC, USA: American Psychological Association (APA), 2012
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76865 (URN)10.1037/a0027021 (DOI)000306861800011 ()22250855 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-04-20 Created: 2012-04-20 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Bergman Nordgren, L., Andersson, G., Kadowaki, Å. & Carlbring, P. (2012). Tailored internet-administered treatment of anxiety disorders for primary care patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials, 13(1), 16.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tailored internet-administered treatment of anxiety disorders for primary care patients: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial
2012 (English)In: Trials, ISSN 1745-6215, Vol. 13, no 1, 16- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Internet-administered cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) has been found to be effective for a range of anxiety disorders. However, most studies have focused on one specific primary diagnosis and co-morbidity has not been considered. In primary care settings, patients with anxiety often suffer from more than one psychiatric condition, making it difficult to disseminate ICBT for specific conditions. The aim of this study will be to investigate if ICBT tailored according to symptom profile can be a feasible treatment for primary care patients with anxiety disorders. It is a randomised controlled trial aimed to evaluate the treatment against an active control group. METHODS: Participants with anxiety disorders and co-morbid conditions (N = 128), will be recruited from a primary care population. The Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation (CORE-OM) will serve as the primary outcome measure. Secondary measures include self-reported depression, anxiety, quality of life and loss of production and the use of health care. All assessments will be collected via the Internet and measure points will be baseline, post treatment and 12 months post treatment. DISCUSSION: This trial will add to the body of knowledge on the effectiveness of ICBT for anxiety disorders in primary care. The trial will also add knowledge on the long term effects of ICBT when delivered for regular clinic patients Trial registration: Clinical trials identifier NCT01390168.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2012
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-75492 (URN)10.1186/1745-6215-13-16 (DOI)000301737300001 ()22321916 (PubMedID)
Note
funding agencies|Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research||Available from: 2012-03-05 Created: 2012-03-05 Last updated: 2014-11-28
Andersson, G., Estling, F., Jakobsson, E., Cuijpers, P. & Carlbring, P. (2011). Can the patient decide which modules to endorse? An open trial of tailored internet treatment of anxiety disorders.. Cognitive behaviour therapy, 40(1), 57-64.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can the patient decide which modules to endorse? An open trial of tailored internet treatment of anxiety disorders.
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2011 (English)In: Cognitive behaviour therapy, ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 40, no 1, 57-64 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy commonly consists of disorder-specific modules that are based on face-to-face manuals. A recent development in the field is to tailor the treatment according to patient profile, which has the potential to cover comorbid conditions in association with anxiety and mood disorders. However, it could be that the patients themselves are able to decide what modules to use. The authors tested this in an open pilot trial with 27 patients with mixed anxiety disorders. Modules were introduced with a brief description, and patients could choose which modules to use. The exception was the two first modules and the last, which involved psychoeducation and relapse prevention. The treatment period lasted for 10 weeks. Results showed large within-group effect sizes, with an average Cohen's d of 0.88. In a structured clinical interview, a majority (54%) had significantly improved 10 weeks after commencing treatment. Only one person dropped out. On the basis of results of this preliminary study, the authors suggest that the role of choice and tailoring should be further explored in controlled trials and that patient choice could be incorporated into Internet-delivered treatment packages.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66458 (URN)10.1080/16506073.2010.529457 (DOI)21337215 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-16 Created: 2011-03-16 Last updated: 2014-11-28Bibliographically approved
Andersson, G., Gustafsson, T., Lundén, C., Henriksson, O., Fattahi, K., Zetterqvist Westin, V., . . . Hesser, H. (2011). Internet-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for tinnitus patients. Paper presented at The European Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies (41th annual conference, p. 158 abstract), Reykjavik , September 3, 2011.. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for tinnitus patients
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2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76857 (URN)
Conference
The European Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Therapies (41th annual conference, p. 158 abstract), Reykjavik , September 3, 2011.
Available from: 2012-04-20 Created: 2012-04-20 Last updated: 2014-11-28
Carlbring, P. & Andersson, G. (2011). Successful Self-Treatment of a Case of Writer's Block.. Cognitive behaviour therapy, 40(1), 1-4.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Successful Self-Treatment of a Case of Writer's Block.
2011 (English)In: Cognitive behaviour therapy, ISSN 1651-2316, Vol. 40, no 1, 1-4 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66460 (URN)10.1080/16506073.2010.549791 (DOI)21337210 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-16 Created: 2011-03-16 Last updated: 2011-04-14Bibliographically approved
Furmark, T., Carlbring, P., Hammer, S., Wahlgren, I., Ekselius, L., Eriksson, E. & Andersson, G. (2010). Effects of Serotonin Transporter and Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 Gene Variation on the Response to Cognitive-Behavior Therapy in Individuals with Social Anxiety Disorder in BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY, vol 67, issue 9, pp 114S-114S. In: BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY (pp. 114S-114S). Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam., 67(9).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Serotonin Transporter and Tryptophan Hydroxylase-2 Gene Variation on the Response to Cognitive-Behavior Therapy in Individuals with Social Anxiety Disorder in BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY, vol 67, issue 9, pp 114S-114S
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2010 (English)In: BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY, Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. , 2010, Vol. 67, no 9, 114S-114S p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam., 2010
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58792 (URN)000277064200364 ()
Available from: 2010-08-27 Created: 2010-08-27 Last updated: 2014-11-28
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