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Carlsson Tedgren, Åsa
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Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Morén, B., Larsson, T. & Carlsson Tedgren, Å. (2019). An extended dose-volume model in high dose-rate brachytherapy: Using mean-tail-dose to reduce tumor underdosage. Medical physics (Lancaster), 46(6), 2556-2566
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An extended dose-volume model in high dose-rate brachytherapy: Using mean-tail-dose to reduce tumor underdosage
2019 (English)In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 46, no 6, p. 2556-2566Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose High dose-rate brachytherapy is a method of radiotherapy for cancer treatment in which the radiation source is placed within the body. In addition to give a high enough dose to a tumor, it is also important to spare nearby healthy organs [organs at risk (OAR)]. Dose plans are commonly evaluated using the so-called dosimetric indices; for the tumor, the portion of the structure that receives a sufficiently high dose is calculated, while for OAR it is instead the portion of the structure that receives a sufficiently low dose that is of interest. Models that include dosimetric indices are referred to as dose-volume models (DVMs) and have received much interest recently. Such models do not take the dose to the coldest (least irradiated) volume of the tumor into account, which is a distinct weakness since research indicates that the treatment effect can be largely impaired by tumor underdosage even to small volumes. Therefore, our aim is to extend a DVM to also consider the dose to the coldest volume. Methods An improved DVM for dose planning is proposed. In addition to optimizing with respect to dosimetric indices, this model also takes mean dose to the coldest volume of the tumor into account. Results Our extended model has been evaluated against a standard DVM in ten prostate geometries. Our results show that the dose to the coldest volume could be increased, while also computing times for the dose planning were improved. Conclusion While the proposed model yields dose plans similar to other models in most aspects, it fulfils its purpose of increasing the dose to cold tumor volumes. An additional benefit is shorter solution times, and especially for clinically relevant times (of minutes) we show major improvements in tumour dosimetric indices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
cold volumes, CVaR, dose-volume model, dosimetric index, dwell time optimization, EUD, mean-tail-dose, TCP
National Category
Computational Mathematics Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157356 (URN)10.1002/mp.13533 (DOI)000471277705311 ()30972758 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85065984130 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR-NT 2015-04543Swedish Cancer Society, CAN 2015/618
Note

Funding agencies:  Swedish Research Council [VR-NT 2015-04543]; Swedish Cancer Foundation [CAN 2015/618]

Available from: 2019-06-12 Created: 2019-06-12 Last updated: 2019-07-15Bibliographically approved
Morén, B., Larsson, T. & Carlsson Tedgren, Å. (2018). Preventing Hot Spots in High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy. In: Kliewer, Natalia; Ehmke, Jan Fabian; Borndörfer, Ralf (Ed.), Operations Research Proceedings 2017: . Paper presented at Annual International Conference of the German Operations Research Society (GOR), Freie Universiät Berlin, Germany, September 6-8, 2017 (pp. 369-375). Springer International Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preventing Hot Spots in High Dose-Rate Brachytherapy
2018 (English)In: Operations Research Proceedings 2017 / [ed] Kliewer, Natalia; Ehmke, Jan Fabian; Borndörfer, Ralf, Springer International Publishing , 2018, p. 369-375Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

High dose-rate brachytherapy is a method of radiation cancer treatment, where the radiation source is placed inside the body. The recommended way to evaluate dose plans is based on dosimetric indices which are aggregate measures of the received dose. Insufficient spatial distribution of the dose may however result in hot spots, which are contiguous volumes in the tumour that receive a dose that is much too high. We use mathematical optimization to adjust a dose plan that is acceptable with respect to dosimetric indices to also take spatial distribution of the dose into account. This results in large-scale nonlinear mixed-binary models that are solved using nonlinear approximations. We show that there are substantial degrees of freedom in the dose planning even though the levels of dosimetric indices are maintained, and that it is possible to improve a dose plan with respect to its spatial properties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer International Publishing, 2018
Series
Operations Research Proceedings, ISSN 0721-5924 ; 2017
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154967 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-89920-6_50 (DOI)978-3-319-89919-0 (ISBN)978-3-319-89920-6 (ISBN)
Conference
Annual International Conference of the German Operations Research Society (GOR), Freie Universiät Berlin, Germany, September 6-8, 2017
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-03-07
Quast, U., Kaulich, T. W., Alvarez-Romero, J. T., Carlsson Tedgren, Å., Enger, S. A., Medich, D. C., . . . Abu Zakaria, G. (2016). A brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) for probe-type dosimetry. Physica medica (Testo stampato), 32(6), 741-748
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) for probe-type dosimetry
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2016 (English)In: Physica medica (Testo stampato), ISSN 1120-1797, E-ISSN 1724-191X, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 741-748Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: In photon brachytherapy (BT), experimental dosimetry is needed to verify treatment plans if planning algorithms neglect varying attenuation, absorption or scattering conditions. The detectors response is energy dependent, including the detector material to water dose ratio and the intrinsic mechanisms. The local mean photon energy E(r) must be known or another equivalent energy quality parameter used. We propose the brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) ((E) over bar), to characterize the photon radiation quality in view of measurements of distributions of the absorbed dose to water, D-w, around BT sources. Materials and methods: While the external photon beam radiotherapy (EBRT) radiation quality index Q(EBRT) ((E) over bar) = TPR1020((E) over bar) is not applicable to BT, the authors have applied a novel energy dependent parameter, called brachytherapy photon radiation quality index, defined as Q(BT) ((E) over bar) = D-prim(r = 2 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees)/D-prim(r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees), utilizing precise primary absorbed dose data, D-prim, from source reference databases, without additional MC-calculations. Results and discussion: For BT photon sources used clinically, Q(BT) ((E) over bar) enables to determine the effective mean linear attenuation coefficient (mu) over bar (E) and thus the effective energy of the primary photons E-prim(eff)(r(0), theta(0)) at the TG-43 reference position P-ref (r(0) = 1 cm; theta(0) = 90 degrees) being close to the mean total photon energy (E) over bar (tot)(r(0), theta(0)). If one has calibrated detectors, published (E) over bar (tot)(r) and the BT radiation quality correction factor k(Q, Q0)(BT) ((E) over bar, r, theta) for different BT radiation qualities Q and Q(0), the detectors response can be determined and D-w(r, theta) measured in the vicinity of BT photon sources. Conclusions: This novel brachytherapy photon radiation quality index Q(BT) characterizes sufficiently accurate and precise the primary photon` s penetration probability and scattering potential. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2016
Keywords
Photon brachytherapy radiation quality index; Absorbed dose to water; Detector response; Effective energy
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130072 (URN)10.1016/j.ejmp.2016.03.008 (DOI)000377373600001 ()27237583 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-06 Created: 2016-07-06 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Holm, Å., Carlsson Tedgren, Å. & Larsson, T. (2016). Heuristics for Integrated Optimization of Catheter Positioning and Dwell Time Distribution in Prostate HDR Brachytherapy. Annals of Operations Research, 236(2), 319-339
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heuristics for Integrated Optimization of Catheter Positioning and Dwell Time Distribution in Prostate HDR Brachytherapy
2016 (English)In: Annals of Operations Research, ISSN 0254-5330, E-ISSN 1572-9338, Vol. 236, no 2, p. 319-339Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy is a kind of radiotherapy used to treat, among others, prostate cancer. When applied to prostate cancer a radioactive source is moved through catheters implanted into the prostate. For each patient a treatment plan is constructed that decide for example catheter placement and dwell time distribution, that is where to stop the radioactive source and for how long.

Mathematical optimization methods has been used to find quality plans with respect to dwell time distribution, however few optimization approaches regarding catheter placement have been studied. In this article we present an integrated optimization model that optimize catheter placement and dwell time distribution simultaneously. Our results show that integrating the two decisions yields greatly improved plans, from 15% to 94% improvement.

Since the presented model is computationally demanding to solve we also present three heuristics: tabu search, variable neighbourhood search and genetic algorithm. Of these variable neighbourhood search is clearly the best, outperforming a state-of-the-art optimization software (CPLEX) and the two other heuristics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Brachytherapy, Dose planning, Catheter positioning, Mixed integer programming, Metaheuristics
National Category
Mathematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67788 (URN)10.1007/s10479-013-1448-7 (DOI)000368946400003 ()
Available from: 2011-04-26 Created: 2011-04-26 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Ballester, F., Carlsson Tedgren, Å., Granero, D., Haworth, A., Mourtada, F., Paiva Fonseca, G., . . . Beaulieu, L. (2015). A generic high-dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism. Medical physics (Lancaster), 42(6), 3048-3062
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A generic high-dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy source for evaluation of model-based dose calculations beyond the TG-43 formalism
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2015 (English)In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 3048-3062Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: In order to facilitate a smooth transition for brachytherapy dose calculations from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group No. 43 (TG-43) formalism to model-based dose calculation algorithms (MBDCAs), treatment planning systems (TPSs) using a MBDCA require a set of well-defined test case plans characterized by Monte Carlo (MC) methods. This also permits direct dose comparison to TG-43 reference data. Such test case plans should be made available for use in the software commissioning process performed by clinical end users. To this end, a hypothetical, generic high-dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 source and a virtual water phantom were designed, which can be imported into a TPS. Methods: A hypothetical, generic HDR Ir-192 source was designed based on commercially available sources as well as a virtual, cubic water phantom that can be imported into any TPS in DICOM format. The dose distribution of the generic Ir-192 source when placed at the center of the cubic phantom, and away from the center under altered scatter conditions, was evaluated using two commercial MBDCAs [Oncentra (R) Brachy with advanced collapsed-cone engine (ACE) and BrachyVision AcuRos (TM)]. Dose comparisons were performed using state-of-the-art MC codes for radiation transport, including ALGEBRA, BrachyDose, GEANT4, MCNP5, MCNP6, and pENELopE2008. The methodologies adhered to recommendations in the AAPM TG-229 report on high-energy brachytherapy source dosimetry. TG-43 dosimetry parameters, an along-away dose-rate table, and primary and scatter separated (PSS) data were obtained. The virtual water phantom of (201)(3) voxels (1 mm sides) was used to evaluate the calculated dose distributions. Two test case plans involving a single position of the generic HDR Ir-192 source in this phantom were prepared: (i) source centered in the phantom and (ii) source displaced 7 cm laterally from the center. Datasets were independently produced by different investigators. MC results were then compared against dose calculated using TG-43 and MBDCA methods. Results: TG-43 and PSS datasets were generated for the generic source, the PSS data for use with the ACE algorithm. The dose-rate constant values obtained from seven MC simulations, performed independently using different codes, were in excellent agreement, yielding an average of 1.1109 +/- 0.0004 cGy/(h U) (k = 1, Type A uncertainty). MC calculated dose-rate distributions for the two plans were also found to be in excellent agreement, with differences within type A uncertainties. Differences between commercial MBDCA and MC results were test, position, and calculation parameter dependent. On average, however, these differences were within 1% for ACUROS and 2% for ACE at clinically relevant distances. Conclusions: A hypothetical, generic HDR Ir-192 source was designed and implemented in two commercially available TPSs employing different MBDCAs. Reference dose distributions for this source were benchmarked and used for the evaluation of MBDCA calculations employing a virtual, cubic water phantom in the form of a CT DICOM image series. The implementation of a generic source of identical design in all TPSs using MBDCAs is an important step toward supporting univocal commissioning procedures and direct comparisons between TPSs. (C) 2015 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Physicists in Medicine: Medical Physics, 2015
Keywords
Ir-192; HDR brachytherapy; Monte Carlo methods; model-based dose calculation; TG-186
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120661 (URN)10.1118/1.4921020 (DOI)000356998300031 ()26127057 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-08-20 Created: 2015-08-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Paiva Fonseca, G., Carlsson Tedgren, Å., Reniers, B., Nilsson, J., Persson, M., Yoriyaz, H. & Verhaegen, F. (2015). Dose specification for Ir-192 high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium. Physics in Medicine and Biology, 60(11), 4565-4579
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dose specification for Ir-192 high dose rate brachytherapy in terms of dose-to-water-in-medium and dose-to-medium-in-medium
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2015 (English)In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 60, no 11, p. 4565-4579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy with Ir-192 is usually based on the TG-43U1 protocol where all media are considered to be water. Several dose calculation algorithms have been developed that are capable of handling heterogeneities with two possibilities to report dose: dose-to-medium-inmedium (D-m,D-m) and dose-to-water-in-medium (D-w,D-m). The relation between D-m,D-m and D-w,D-m for Ir-192 is the main goal of this study, in particular the dependence of D-w,D-m on the dose calculation approach using either large cavity theory (LCT) or small cavity theory (SCT). A head and neck case was selected due to the presence of media with a large range of atomic numbers relevant to tissues and mass densities such as air, soft tissues and bone interfaces. This case was simulated using a Monte Carlo (MC) code to score: D-m,D-m, D-w,D-m (LCT), mean photon energy and photon fluence. D-w,D-m (SCT) was derived from MC simulations using the ratio between the unrestricted collisional stopping power of the actual medium and water. Differences between D-m,D-m and D-w,D-m (SCT or LCT) can be negligible (less than1%) for some tissues e.g. muscle and significant for other tissues with differences of up to 14% for bone. Using SCT or LCT approaches leads to differences between D-w,D-m (SCT) and D-w,D-m (LCT) up to 29% for bone and 36% for teeth. The mean photon energy distribution ranges from 222 keV up to 356 keV. However, results obtained using mean photon energies are not equivalent to the ones obtained using the full, local photon spectrum. This work concludes that it is essential that brachytherapy studies clearly report the dose quantity. It further shows that while differences between D-m,D-m and D-w,D-m (SCT) mainly depend on tissue type, differences between D-m,D-m and D-w,D-m (LCT) are, in addition, significantly dependent on the local photon energy fluence spectrum which varies with distance to implanted sources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOP Publishing: Hybrid Open Access, 2015
Keywords
brachytherapy; Ir-192; dose-to-water-in-medium; dose-to-medium-in-medium
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119572 (URN)10.1088/0031-9155/60/11/4565 (DOI)000355210600023 ()26009538 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo (FAPESP) [2011/01913-4, 2011/23765-7, 2011/22778-8]; Swedish Cancer Foundation [CF 14 064]

Available from: 2015-06-23 Created: 2015-06-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Candela-Juan, C., Karlsson, M., Lundell, M., Ballester, F. & Carlsson Tedgren, Å. (2015). Dosimetric characterization of two radium sources for retrospective dosimetry studies. Medical physics (Lancaster), 42(5), 2132-2142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dosimetric characterization of two radium sources for retrospective dosimetry studies
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2015 (English)In: Medical physics (Lancaster), ISSN 0094-2405, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 2132-2142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: During the first part of the 20th century, Ra-226 was the most used radionuclide for brachytherapy. Retrospective accurate dosimetry, coupled with patient follow up, is important for advancing knowledge on long-term radiation effects. The purpose of this work was to dosimetrically characterize two Ra-226 sources, commonly used in Sweden during the first half of the 20th century, for retrospective dose-effect studies. Methods: An 8 mg Ra-226 tube and a 10 mg Ra-226 needle, used at Radiumhemmet (Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden), from 1925 to the 1960s, were modeled in two independent Monte Carlo (MC) radiation transport codes: GEANT4 and MCNP5. Absorbed dose and collision kerma around the two sources were obtained, from which the TG-43 parameters were derived for the secular equilibrium state. Furthermore, results from this dosimetric formalism were compared with results from a MC simulation with a superficial mould constituted by five needles inside a glass casing, placed over a water phantom, trying to mimic a typical clinical setup. Calculated absorbed doses using the TG-43 formalism were also compared with previously reported measurements and calculations based on the Sievert integral. Finally, the dose rate at large distances from a Ra-226 point-like-source placed in the center of 1 m radius water sphere was calculated with GEANT4. Results: TG-43 parameters [including gL(r), F(r,theta), Lambda, and s(K)] have been uploaded in spreadsheets as additional material, and the fitting parameters of a mathematical curve that provides the dose rate between 10 and 60 cm from the source have been provided. Results from TG-43 formalism are consistent within the treatment volume with those of a MC simulation of a typical clinical scenario. Comparisons with reported measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters show differences up to 13% along the transverse axis of the radium needle. It has been estimated that the uncertainty associated to the absorbed dose within the treatment volume is 10%-15%, whereas uncertainty of absorbed dose to distant organs is roughly 20%-25%. Conclusions: The results provided here facilitate retrospective dosimetry studies of Ra-226 using modern treatment planning systems, which may be used to improve knowledge on long term radiation effects. It is surely important for the epidemiologic studies to be aware of the estimated uncertainty provided here before extracting their conclusions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Association of Physicists in Medicine: Medical Physics, 2015
Keywords
brachytherapy; retrospective dosimetry; radium; TG-43 formalism
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119260 (URN)10.1118/1.4916685 (DOI)000354776800005 ()25979008 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Generalitat Valenciana [PROMETEOII/2013/010]; Spanish Government [FIS2013-42156]; European Commission [FP7-269553]; Swedish Radiation Safety Authority [SSM 2011-2499]

Available from: 2015-06-12 Created: 2015-06-12 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Adolfsson, E., White, S., Landry, G., Lund, E., Gustafsson, H., Verhaegen, F., . . . Alm Carlsson, G. (2015). Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source: Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film. Physics in Medicine and Biology, 60(9), 3869-3882
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Measurement of absorbed dose to water around an electronic brachytherapy source: Comparison of two dosimetry systems: lithium formate EPR dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film
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2015 (English)In: Physics in Medicine and Biology, ISSN 0031-9155, E-ISSN 1361-6560, Vol. 60, no 9, p. 3869-3882Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interest in high dose rate (HDR) electronic brachytherapy operating at 50 kV is increasing. For quality assurance it is important to identify dosimetry systems that can measure the absorbed doses in absolute terms which is difficult in this energy region. In this work a comparison is made between two dosimetry systems, EPR lithium formate dosimeters and radiochromic EBT2 film.

Both types of dosimeters were irradiated simultaneously in a PMMA phantom using the Axxent EBS. Absorbed dose to water was determined at distances of 10 mm, 30 mm and 50 mm from the EBS. Results were traceable to different primary standards as regards to absorbed dose to water (EPR) and air kerma (EBT2). Monte Carlo simulations were used in absolute terms as a third estimate of absorbed dose to water.

Agreement within the estimated expanded (k = 2) uncertainties (5% (EPR), 7% (EBT2)) was found between the results at 30 mm and 50 mm from the x-ray source. The same result was obtained in 4 repetitions of irradiation, indicating high precision in the measurements with both systems. At all distances, agreement between EPR and Monte Carlo simulations was shown as was also the case for the film measurements at 30mm and 50mm. At 10mm the geometry for the film measurements caused too large uncertainty in measured values depending on the exact position (within sub-mm distances) of the EBS and the 10 mm film results were exculded from comparison.

This work has demonstrated good performance of the lithium formate EPR dosimetry system in accordance with earlier experiments at higher photon energies (192Ir HDR brachytherapy). It was also highlighted that there might be issues regarding the energy dependence and intrinsic efficiency of the EBT2 film that need to be considered for measurements using low energy sources.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2015
Keywords
Electronic brachytherapy, EPR, lithium formate, radiochromic film, intrinsic efficiency
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111090 (URN)10.1088/0031-9155/60/9/3869 (DOI)000354104700030 ()
Available from: 2014-10-07 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Lindborg, L., Hultqvist, M., Carlsson Tedgren, Å. & Nikjoo, H. (2015). Nanodosimetry and RBE values in radiotherapy. Radiation Protection Dosimetry, 166(1-4), 339-342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nanodosimetry and RBE values in radiotherapy
2015 (English)In: Radiation Protection Dosimetry, ISSN 0144-8420, E-ISSN 1742-3406, Vol. 166, no 1-4, p. 339-342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a recent paper, the authors reported that the dose mean lineal energy, (y) over bar (D) in a volume of about 10-15 nm is approximately proportional to the alpha-parameter in the linear-quadratic relation used in fractionated radiotherapy in both low- and high-LET beams. This was concluded after analyses of reported radiation weighting factors, W-isoE (clinical RBE values), and (y) over bar (D) values in a large range of volumes. Usually, microdosimetry measurements in the nanometer range are difficult; therefore, model calculations become necessary. In this paper, the authors discuss the calculation method. A combination of condensed history Monte Carlo and track structure techniques for calculation of mean lineal energy values turned out to be quite useful. Briefly, the method consists in weighting the relative dose fractions of the primary and secondary charged particles with their respective energy-dependent dose mean lineal energies. The latter were obtained using a large database of Monte Carlo track structure calculations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122120 (URN)10.1093/rpd/ncv196 (DOI)000361806600069 ()25953788 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM); Karolinska Institutet (KI)

Available from: 2015-10-19 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01
Lundell, M., Karlsson, M. & Carlsson Tedgren, Å. (2015). New dosimetry for childhood skin hemangioma treatments with Ra-226 needles or tubes. Radiotherapy and Oncology, 116(1), 139-142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New dosimetry for childhood skin hemangioma treatments with Ra-226 needles or tubes
2015 (English)In: Radiotherapy and Oncology, ISSN 0167-8140, E-ISSN 1879-0887, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 139-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Stockholm Hemangioma Cohort is important for evaluation of late effects after exposure to ionizing radiation during childhood. Dose estimates in this cohort were based on both measurements and calculations using an old treatment planning system. Methods: We compare previously published and calculated dose estimates with new ones, obtained by Monte Carlo simulations, which mimic the hemangioma treatments with Ra-226 needles and tubes. The distances between the Ra-226 sources and the thyroid and breasts, respectively, were reassessed. Result:. The Monte Carlo calculations showed significantly lower dose values than those obtained earlier. The differences depended both on the modeling of the sources and on further individualized distances from the sources. The mean value of the new calculated doses was 25% of the old breast doses and 46% of the old thyroid doses. Conclusion: New dosimetry for hemangioma treatments gives significantly lower organ doses for the few cases receiving the highest absorbed dose values. This implies that radiation risk estimates will increase and have to be recalculated. For retrospective studies it is now possible to calculate organ doses from radium treatments using modern treatment planning systems by modeling the source geometry carefully and apply the TG-43 formalism. It is important to be aware of the large uncertainties in calculated absorbed dose values.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2015
Keywords
Radium treatment; Hemangioma; Dosimetry; Organ doses; Children
National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122073 (URN)10.1016/j.radonc.2015.06.014 (DOI)000360510400024 ()26104976 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|European Commission [FP7-269553]; Swedish Radiation Safety Authority [SSM 2011-2499]

Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-01
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