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Paulson, F. & Sundin, E. (2019). Challenges when including sustainability aspects in product development at two large manufacturing companies in Sweden. In: Allen H. Hu, Mitsutaka Matsumoto, Tsai Chi Kuo, Shana Smith (Ed.), Technologies and Eco-innovation towards Sustainability I: Eco Design of Products and Services. Paper presented at Going Green EcoDesign2017 10th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing November 29 - December 1, 2017, Tainan, Taiwan (pp. 229-243). Singapore: Springer, I
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges when including sustainability aspects in product development at two large manufacturing companies in Sweden
2019 (English)In: Technologies and Eco-innovation towards Sustainability I: Eco Design of Products and Services / [ed] Allen H. Hu, Mitsutaka Matsumoto, Tsai Chi Kuo, Shana Smith, Singapore: Springer, 2019, Vol. I, p. 229-243Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When including sustainability aspects in product development challenges may arise. The aim of this paperis to expand current knowledge about challenges faced by manufacturing companies when includingsustainability aspects in product development. To fulfil the aim, a multiple case study at two largemanufacturing companies was conducted. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews,complemented with data from the companies’ sustainability reports. The novelty of this research is an expansion of the existing knowledge about these types ofchallenges. Additionally, drivers for the companies’ inclusion of sustainability aspects in productdevelopment and meaning of sustainability for the companies, are described. The results show that thechallenges differ to a large extent between the two companies. Despite the differences, challenges causedby a lack of recourses, lack of knowledge and need to fulfil economic goals are the most commonly described challenges at the companies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: Springer, 2019
Keywords
ecodesign, environmental conscious design, sustainable, product design, design for environment
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151686 (URN)10.1007/978-981-13-1181-9_18 (DOI)9789811311802 (ISBN)9789811311819 (ISBN)
Conference
Going Green EcoDesign2017 10th International Symposium on Environmentally Conscious Design and Inverse Manufacturing November 29 - December 1, 2017, Tainan, Taiwan
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-01-22Bibliographically approved
Lindkvist Haziri, L., Sundin, E. & Sakao, T. (2019). Feedback from Remanufacturing: Its Unexploited Potential to Improve Future Product Design. Sustainability, 11(15), Article ID 4037.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feedback from Remanufacturing: Its Unexploited Potential to Improve Future Product Design
2019 (English)In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 11, no 15, p. 1article id 4037Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Company interest and research in the circular economy and remanufacturing have increased as a means of reducing negative environmental impacts. Remanufacturing is an industrial process whereby used products are returned to a state of like-new. However, few products are designed for remanufacturing, and further research and industrial efforts are needed to facilitate more widespread use of design for remanufacturing. One crucial factor facilitating design for remanufacturing is the integration of feedback in the product design process. Thus, the objective of this paper is to analyse feedback flows from remanufacturing to product design. Hence, a literature study and multiple case studies were conducted at three companies that design, manufacture and remanufacture different kinds of products. The cross-case analysis revealed the five barriers of the lack of internal awareness, lack of knowledge, lack of incentives, lack of feedback channels and non-supportive organisational structures, and the five enablers of business opportunities, integrated design processes, customers’ demand, laws, regulations and standards, and new technologies. To establish improved feedback from remanufacturing to product design, the barriers need to be addressed and the enablers explored. Thus, improved feedback from remanufacturing to product design will improve the design of future products suited for a more circular economy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019. p. 1
Keywords
feedback; remanufacturing; case studies; design for remanufacturing; circular economy; reduction in negative environmental impacts
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160140 (URN)10.3390/su11154037 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070450645 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-09-09 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-10-23Bibliographically approved
Lindkvist Haziri, L. & Sundin, E. (2019). Supporting design for remanufacturing: A framework for implementing information feedback from remanufacturing to product design. Journal of Remanufacturing, 1-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Supporting design for remanufacturing: A framework for implementing information feedback from remanufacturing to product design
2019 (English)In: Journal of Remanufacturing, ISSN 2210-464X, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Remanufacturing is an industrial process turning used products into a condition of like new or better. Remanufacturing is also one strategy that salvages the value put into products during manufacturing and thus reduces the environmental impact of products over the life-cycle. However, not many products are designed for remanufacturing, and there is rarely any feedback from remanufacturing to design. Since design for remanufacturing is not applied at most manufacturing companies, there is a need to support companies, for example, by information feedback methods. By implementing feedback transfer from remanufacturing to design and employing design for remanufacturing, the remanufacturing process is more likely to be effective and efficient. The aim of this paper is to present a framework that supports design for remanufacturing by the implementation of structured feedback from remanufacturing to design. The framework aims at strategically outlining and practically implementing information feedback from remanufacturing to design. A case company where the framework has been initialised is also presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-160139 (URN)10.1007/s13243-019-00074-7 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-09-09 Created: 2019-09-09 Last updated: 2019-09-11Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, S., Jensen, J., Björkman, M. & Sundin, E. (2018). 11 Rules of Design for Manufacturing CFRP Components (Firsted.). In: Jean Broge (Ed.), So You Want to Design Aircraft: Manufacturing with Composites: (pp. 29-42). SAE International
Open this publication in new window or tab >>11 Rules of Design for Manufacturing CFRP Components
2018 (English)In: So You Want to Design Aircraft: Manufacturing with Composites / [ed] Jean Broge, SAE International , 2018, First, p. 29-42Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) is one of the most commonly used materials in the aerospace industry today. CFRP in pre-impregnated form is an anisotropic material whose properties can be controlled to a high level by the designer. Sometimes, these properties make the material hard to predict with regards to how the geometry affects manufacturing aspects. This chapter describes 11 design rules that describe geometrical design choices and deals with manufacturability problems that are connected to them, why they are connected, and how they can be minimized or avoided. Examples of design choices dealt with in the rules include double curvature shapes, assembly of uncured CFRP components, and access for nondestructive testing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAE International, 2018 Edition: First
Keywords
Aerospace, Aircraft Design, DFM, Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics, CFRP
National Category
Aerospace Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156032 (URN)978-0-7680-9170-0 (ISBN)
Funder
Vinnova, 2011-01431
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2019-04-02Bibliographically approved
Casper, R. & Sundin, E. (2018). Addressing Today’s challenges in automotive remanufacturing. Journal of Remanufacturing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Addressing Today’s challenges in automotive remanufacturing
2018 (English)In: Journal of Remanufacturing, ISSN 2210-4690Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Automotive remanufacturing companies are nowadays facing a wide range ofchallenges. Typical challenges from the point of view of suppliers, producers and customers.Several process steps are analysed and problem fields are dissected: From the core management,to disassembly and cleaning to machining and testing. The main fields of challengesanalysed in this paper are: the vagueness in respect of fiscal value, environmental regulationsand taxation of core parts, the important need for a continuing qualification of staff andengineers, an efficient core management, the adaption of pricing models and the competence tohandle the growing variety and complexity. The focus of this analysis lies on activities of theindependent after-market (IAM) for remanufactured products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Netherlands, 2018
Keywords
Remanufacturing, Automotive, Mechatronics, Electronics, Design for Remanufacturing, Core management, Circular economy
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150064 (URN)10.1007/s13243-018-0047-9 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-09 Created: 2018-08-09 Last updated: 2019-04-02
Sundin, E. (2018). Circular Economy and design for remanufacturing (Firsted.). In: Martin Charter (Ed.), Designing for the Circular Economy: (pp. 186-199). Oxon: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circular Economy and design for remanufacturing
2018 (English)In: Designing for the Circular Economy / [ed] Martin Charter, Oxon: Routledge, 2018, First, p. 186-199Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Circular Economy (CE) means that resources should be kept in use when a product reaches its End-of-Use so they can be reused several times to create further value for the product’s next users. An important starting point with CE is the design of products and manufacturing processes. Products can be designed to be used longer, repaired, upgraded, remanufactured or eventually recycled, instead of being thrown away. With product remanufacturing, the geometrical form of the product is retained and its associated economic value is preserved. Having products designed for several use periods including remanufacturing extends the use-time of products.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon: Routledge, 2018 Edition: First
Keywords
Circlde economy, Design for Remanufacturing, DFRem
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156126 (URN)9781138081017 (ISBN)9781315113067 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-07-03Bibliographically approved
Paulson, F. & Sundin, E. (2018). Inclusion of sustainability aspects in product development – two industrial cases from Sweden. In: Proceedings of NordDesign - Design in the era of digitalization: . Paper presented at NordDesign 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusion of sustainability aspects in product development – two industrial cases from Sweden
2018 (English)In: Proceedings of NordDesign - Design in the era of digitalization, 2018Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Knowledge on how to include sustainability aspects in product development has increased during the last 25 years. Research has contributed with literature reviews, case studies, and the development of supporting methods, frameworks and guidelines.

Despite the large amount of knowledge generated on how to include sustainability aspects in product development, there are few studies that focus on describing how manufacturing companies, in real life, include sustainability aspects in their product development.

The aim of this paper is to describe how two manufacturing companies include sustainability aspects in their product development, make a comparison between them, and relate findings with prior studies. To fulfil the aim, a multiple case study at two large Swedish manufacturing companies was conducted. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and by analyzing sustainability reports.This paper provides two novel context-dependent descriptions of how large manufacturing companies include sustainability aspects in their product development. There are several similarities identified between the two companies in this study and descriptions inprior studies of how manufacturing companies include sustainability aspects in their product development. For example, there are manufacturing companies that systematically include sustainability aspects in product development; however, what is systemized differs between thecompanies.This research suggests that the easier an aspect can be related to the design of the product the more likely the aspect will be considered by actors in the product development function, such as design engineers. Additionally, this research indicates that the product owner is animportant internal actor who affects the inclusion of sustainability aspects in product development, and especially the inclusion of sustainability aspects in product requirements. Further studies are suggested on how product owners elicit and prioritize sustainability aspects, how these aspects are formulated in product requirements, as well as how, and how commonly, marketing and sales elicit sustainability aspects from customers.

Keywords
Ecodesign, design for environment, environmentally conscious design, design, case study, practice
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156127 (URN)
Conference
NordDesign 2018
Available from: 2019-04-03 Created: 2019-04-03 Last updated: 2019-06-05
Paulson, F. & Sundin, E. (2018). Inclusion of sustainability aspects in product development – two industrial cases from Sweden. In: : . Paper presented at NordDesign 2018 - Design in the era of digitalization, August 14-17, 2018, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. Swedish Design Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inclusion of sustainability aspects in product development – two industrial cases from Sweden
2018 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Knowledge on how to include sustainability aspects in product development has increased during the last 25 years. Research has contributed with literature reviews, case studies, and the development of supporting methods, frameworks and guidelines. Despite the large amount of knowledge generated on how to include sustainability aspects in product development, there are few studies that focus on describing how manufacturing companies, in real life, include sustainability aspects in their product development. The aim of this paper is to describe how two manufacturing companies include sustainability aspects in their product development, make a comparison between them, and relate findings with prior studies. To fulfil the aim, a multiple case study at two large Swedish manufacturing companies was conducted. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews and by analyzing sustainability reports. This paper provides two novel context-dependent descriptions of how large manufacturing companies include sustainability aspects in their product development. There are several similarities identified between the two companies in this study and descriptions inprior studies of how manufacturing companies include sustainability aspects in their product development. For example, there are manufacturing companies that systematically include sustainability aspects in product development; however, what is systemized differs between the companies.This research suggests that the easier an aspect can be related to the design of the product the more likely the aspect will be considered by actors in the product development function, such as design engineers. Additionally, this research indicates that the product owner is an important internal actor who affects the inclusion of sustainability aspects in product development, and especially the inclusion of sustainability aspects in product requirements. Further studies are suggested on how product owners elicit and prioritize sustainability aspects, how these aspects are formulated in product requirements, as well as how, and how commonly, marketing and sales elicit sustainability aspects from customers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Swedish Design Society, 2018
Keywords
ecodesign, design for environment, environmentally conscious design, design, case study, practice
National Category
Other Engineering and Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-151687 (URN)978-91-7685-185-2 (ISBN)
Conference
NordDesign 2018 - Design in the era of digitalization, August 14-17, 2018, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
Available from: 2018-10-01 Created: 2018-10-01 Last updated: 2019-03-29Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, S., Sundin, E. & Lindahl, M. (2018). Integrated product service offerings: Challenges in setting requirements. Journal of Cleaner Production, 201, pp. 879-887
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrated product service offerings: Challenges in setting requirements
2018 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 201, p. 879-887Article in journal, News item (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective of this paper is to explore what challenges exist when setting requirements for an Integrated Product Service Offering (IPSO). An IPSO, sometimes called Product Service System, is a concept with increased interest from manufacturing companies. It consists of a combination of products and services that, based on a life cycle perspective, have been integrated to fit targeted customer needs. In order to achieve a successful IPSO, it is important to collect aspects from many actors, something which sometimes is challenging for companies moving towards providing IPSOs.

The four challenges found when setting requirements in IPSO development are; identification and inclusion of relevant aspects from relevant actors throughout the IPSO’s life cycle, understanding of the underlying aspects for all requirements for all elements of the offering, prioritization of requirements, and the difficulty to track how requirements affect each other between different elements in the IPSO.

The methodology used to find these challenges was a combination of a structured literature review and an interview study at three manufacturing companies moving towards providing IPSOs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Requirements Engineering; Integrated product service engineering (IPSE); Eco-design; Product service system (PSS); Systems engineering
National Category
Environmental Management Other Mechanical Engineering Other Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150354 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2018.08.090 (DOI)000445981200076 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Mistra REES (Resource Efficient and Effective Solutions) program - Mistra (The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research)

Available from: 2018-08-18 Created: 2018-08-18 Last updated: 2018-10-17Bibliographically approved
Casper, R. & Sundin, E. (2018). Reverse Logistic Transportation and Packaging Concepts in Automotive Remanufacturing. Procedia Manufacturing, 25, 154-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reverse Logistic Transportation and Packaging Concepts in Automotive Remanufacturing
2018 (English)In: Procedia Manufacturing, E-ISSN 2351-9789, Vol. 25, p. 154-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A key process in a closed-loop supply chain is managing and challenging the transportation and packaging management. Strict environmental regulations in connection with transport of environmentally hazardous substances (e.g. oil) are offering a highcost-saving potential in connection with an optimised transportation and packaging concept. The aim of this case orientated paperis to provide the framework for the management of reverse flow of materials in automotive industry. The emphasis is placed onthe remanufacturing activities. To obtain and verify the necessary information for the above mentioned problems, differentmethods and techniques have been applied: 1) Relevant, available literature in connection with this matter was studied; 2) Dataand documents was requested directly by relevant market actors; 3) The clustered data was analysed and samples werehighlighted; and 4) The data was evaluated and recommended courses of action were given. The results show that the mainproblems appear in the area of forward and reverse logistics: Packaging concepts which do not protect the product in an optimalway (forward / reverse logistics). Moreover, packaging concepts which do not protect the environment against potential negativeinfluence of a used part (reverse logistics) A best practice for the transportation of engine components is given and evaluated: Anengine in a metal frame with oil-pan. Securely attached by bolts. Packed in plastic bag.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Reverse logistics, remanufacturing, closed loop supply chain, transportation systems
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-150063 (URN)10.1016/j.promfg.2018.06.069 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-08-09 Created: 2018-08-09 Last updated: 2018-08-24
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2552-3636

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