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Sjöholm, H., Hägg, S., Nyberg, L., Lindh, J. & Kammerlind, A.-S. (2022). Exploring possible risk factors for time to first fall and 6-month fall incidence in persons with acute stroke. SAGE Open Medicine, 10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring possible risk factors for time to first fall and 6-month fall incidence in persons with acute stroke
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2022 (English)In: SAGE Open Medicine, E-ISSN 2050-3121, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim was to explore how the time to the first fall and 6-month fall incidence relates to rapidly and easily collected data in persons with acute stroke.

Methods: Out of consecutively admitted patients with stroke at three stroke units, 284 with at least one follow-up were included in this prospective cohort study. During 6 months following discharge, participants reported falls using a diary and monthly phone calls. Data about participants characteristics, functions, and activities were collected during hospital stay and analyzed in relation to time to first fall by Cox regression and fall incidence by negative binomial regression.

Results: Use of >= 9 medications, paresis in arms, paresis in legs (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale), impaired protective reactions in sitting (Postural Reactions Test), and limitations in self-care (Barthel Index) were decisive risk factors for time to first fall. Limitations in mobility (Step Test, 30-s Chair Stand Test) were decisive risk factors for high fall incidence (p < 0.0005).

Conclusion: Several easily collected participant characteristics, functions, and activities were identified as risk factors for falls. The findings emphasize the width of assessments that can be used for the identification of individuals at risk for falls and that the risk factors vary in different strata of the population. These results are important when developing multivariate risk models. The risk factors differed in part when analyzing the time to the first fall and 6-month fall incidence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mannheim, Germany: Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Stroke; cerebral infarction; accidental falls; risk factors; patient outcome assessment
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-184409 (URN)10.1177/20503121221088093 (DOI)000777979700001 ()35387151 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies: Futurum Region Jönköping County [FUTURUM-394751, FUTURUM-422461, FUTURUM-484411, FUTURUM-519431]; Swedish Stroke Association; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden UK Research & Innovation (UKRI) Medical Research Council UK (MRC) [FORSS-475481, FORSS-645491, FORSS-931033]

Available from: 2022-04-22 Created: 2022-04-22 Last updated: 2023-12-28Bibliographically approved
Bro, T. & Hägg, S. (2021). Worth changing? Clinical effects of switching treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration from intravitreal ranibizumab and aflibercept to bevacizumab in a region in southern Sweden. European Journal of Ophthalmology, 31(1), 144-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Worth changing? Clinical effects of switching treatment in neovascular age-related macular degeneration from intravitreal ranibizumab and aflibercept to bevacizumab in a region in southern Sweden
2021 (English)In: European Journal of Ophthalmology, ISSN 1120-6721, E-ISSN 1724-6016, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 144-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To examine the clinical effects of switching intravitreal drug treatment from the approved vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, ranibizumab and aflibercept, to off label use of bevacizumab in patients with wet age-related macular degeneration. Methods: This retrospective study scrutinized medical records of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration who switched therapy to bevacizumab due to a policy decision. Best corrected visual acuity, central retinal thickness, and number of injections before and 1 year after the switch was compared. The non-inferiority margin of best corrected visual acuity was five Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters. Results: A switch from ranibizumab was evaluable in 93 eyes and from aflibercept in 19 eyes. Neither of the groups had a significant non-inferior visual acuity 16 month after the switch. Mean best corrected visual acuity in Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study letters was 63.8 (95% confidence interval: 61.3-66.4) before and 62.2 (95% confidence interval: 59.3-65.1) after in the ranibizumab group and 68.2 (95% confidence interval: 63.3-73.1) before and 67.7 (95% confidence interval: 62.8-72.6) after in the aflibercept group. Mean central retinal thickness in micrometers decreased from 254 (95% confidence interval: 247-261) to 250 (95% confidence interval: 225-275) in the ranibizumab group and from 265 (95% confidence interval: 255-276) to 262 (95% confidence interval: 251-273) in the aflibercept group. The treatment was changed again after the switch in 18% of the patients in the ranibizumab group and 19% in the aflibercept group and these subjects were excluded from the analyses. Conclusion: In patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration, a switch from ranibizumab or aflibercept to bevacizumab seems possible without a significant decrease in visual acuity in most patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2021
Keywords
Age-related macular degeneration; retina; legal aspects of medical; surgical therapy; socioeconomics and education in medicine; ophthalmology; practice management; CME; health economics
National Category
Ophthalmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-161849 (URN)10.1177/1120672119883602 (DOI)000492132900001 ()31642333 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Futurum - Akademin for vard och halsa Region Jonkopings lan [FUTURUM-808791]

Available from: 2019-11-18 Created: 2019-11-18 Last updated: 2021-04-13
Hedna, K., Andersson, M. L., Gyllensten, H., Hägg, S. & Böttiger, Y. (2019). Clinical relevance of alerts from a decision support system, PHARAO, for drug safety assessment in the older adults. BMC Geriatrics, 19, Article ID 164.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical relevance of alerts from a decision support system, PHARAO, for drug safety assessment in the older adults
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2019 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 19, article id 164Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundPHARAO is a decision support system developed to evaluate the risk for a set of either common or serious side-effects resulting from a combination of pharmacodynamic effects from a patients medications. The objective of this study was to investigate the validity of the risk scores for the common side-effects generated by PHARAO in older patients.MethodsSide-effects included were sedation, constipation, orthostatic symptoms, anticholinergic and serotonergic effects. The alerts generated by PHARAO were tested in 745 persons 65years old. Dispensed prescriptions retrieved from the Swedish prescribed drug register were used to generate the pharmacological risk scores of patients medications. Symptoms possibly related to side-effects were extracted from medical records data.ResultsThe PHARAO system generated 776 alerts, most often for the risk of anticholinergic symptoms. The total specificity estimates of the PHARAO system were 0.95, 0.89 and 0.78 for high, intermediate and low risk alerts, respectively. The corresponding sensitivity estimates were between 0.12 and 0.37. The negative predictive value was 0.90 and the positive predictive value ranged between 0.20-0.25.ConclusionsThe PHARAO system had a high specificity and negative predictive value to detect symptoms possibly associated with the of patients medications, while the sensitivity and positive predictive value were low. The PHARAO system has the potential to minimise the risk of over-alerts in combination with a drug-drug interaction alert system, but should be used in connection with a medical evaluation of the patient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
Adverse drug reaction; Clinical decision support system; Older adults; Drug interactions; Validity
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-158875 (URN)10.1186/s12877-019-1179-y (DOI)000471159500002 ()31185943 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|National Corporation of Swedish Pharmacies (Apoteket AB); Linkoping university; Region Ostergotland; Region Vastra Gotaland

Available from: 2019-07-16 Created: 2019-07-16 Last updated: 2021-01-21
Sjöholm, H., Hägg, S., Nyberg, L., Rolander, B. & Kammerlind, A.-S. (2019). Correction: The Cone Evasion Walk test: Reliability and validity in acute stroke (vol 24, e1744, 2019). Physiotherapy Research International, 24(3), Article ID e1801.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction: The Cone Evasion Walk test: Reliability and validity in acute stroke (vol 24, e1744, 2019)
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2019 (English)In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 24, no 3, article id e1801Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164528 (URN)10.1002/pri.1801 (DOI)000476567400006 ()31321856 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-20 Created: 2020-03-20 Last updated: 2020-05-02
Ginstman, C., Frisk, J., Carlsson, B., Ärlemalm, A., Hägg, S. & Brynhildsen, J. (2019). Plasma concentrations of etonogestrel in women using oral desogestrel before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: a pharmacokinetic study. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 126(4), 486-492
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plasma concentrations of etonogestrel in women using oral desogestrel before and after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery: a pharmacokinetic study
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2019 (English)In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 126, no 4, p. 486-492Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To investigate whether Roux‐en‐Y gastric bypass (RYGB) affects oral desogestrel (etonogestrel) pharmacokinetics.

Design

Single centre, open label, phase‐2 pharmacokinetic study.

Setting

University hospital of Linköping, Sweden.

Population

Fourteen women with planned RYGB surgery were included; nine women aged 18–45 years using 75 micrograms desogestrel completed the study.

Methods

Steady‐state etonogestrel pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters were measured on three occasions for each individual (at 8 ± 6 weeks before surgery, and at 12 ± 2 and 52 ± 2 weeks after surgery). Each patient served as her own control. On each occasion, serum samples were collected during a 24‐hour period and etonogestrel concentrations were determined with ultra‐performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

Main outcome measures

Area under the plasma concentration time curve of etonogestrel (AUC0–24 hours).

Results

All women had significant postoperative weight loss. There were no significant differences in AUC0–24 hours, terminal half‐lives (t½), time to peak serum concentrations (Tmax), or apparent oral clearances of etonogestrel (CLoral) before and after gastric bypass surgery on any occasion. Peak serum concentrations (Cmax) increased after 52 ± 2 weeks compared with preoperative values (0.817 ng/ml versus 0.590 ng/ml, P = 0.024).

Conclusion

To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the effects on desogestrel pharmacokinetics after RYGB. This study did not reveal any clinically significant changes in etonogestrel pharmacokinetics, suggesting that oral desogestrel may be used by women after RYGB surgery. The sample size was limited, however, and therefore the results should be interpreted cautiously.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2019
Keywords
Contraceptives; desogestrel; etonogestrel; gastric bypass surgery; hormonal contraception; obesity; oral contraceptives; pharmacokinetic; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154831 (URN)10.1111/1471-0528.15511 (DOI)000458702400012 ()30347490 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056623277 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|county council of Ostergotland (ALF)

Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2020-05-02Bibliographically approved
Sjöholm, H., Hägg, S., Nyberg, L., Rolander, B. & Kammerlind, A.-S. (2019). The Cone Evasion Walk test: Reliability and validity in acute stroke. Physiotherapy Research International, 24(1), Article ID e1744.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Cone Evasion Walk test: Reliability and validity in acute stroke
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2019 (English)In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 24, no 1, article id e1744Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

To estimate the reliability and validity of the Cone Evasion Walk test (CEW), a new test assessing the ability to evade obstacles, in people with acute stroke.

Methods

To estimate the reliability of the CEW, video recordings of 20 people with acute stroke performing the test were assessed by 10 physiotherapists on two occasions, resulting in a total of 400 ratings. Patients performed the CEW (n = 221), functional ambulation classification (FAC; n = 204), Timed Up and Go (TUG; n = 173), TUG cognitive (TUG‐cog; n = 139), Serial 7s attention task from the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA‐S7; n = 127), and the Star Cancellation Test (SCT; n = 151). These tests and side of lesion (n = 143) were used to examine construct validity. The predictive validity was evaluated in relation to falls during the following 6 months (n = 203).

Results

The intraclass correlation coefficients for intrarater and interrater reliability were 0.88–0.98. For validity, there were significant correlations between the CEW and FAC (rs = −0.67), TUG (rs = 0.45), MoCA‐S7 (rs = −0.36), and SCT total score (rs = −0.36). There was a significant correlation between the number of cones touched on the left side and the proportion of cancelled stars on the left (rs = −0.23) and right (rs = 0.23) side in the SCT. Among right hemisphere stroke participants (n = 79), significantly more persons hit cones on the left side (n = 25) than the right side (n = 8), whereas among those with a left hemisphere stroke (n = 64) significantly more persons hit cones on the right side (n = 11) than the left (n = 3). Cox regression showed that participants who touched four to eight cones had an increased risk of falls over time (hazard ratio 2.11, 95% CI [1.07, 4.17]) compared with those who touched none.

Conclusion

The new CEW test was reliable and valid in assessing the ability to evade obstacles while walking and to predict falls in patients with acute stroke.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
accidental falls; attention; stroke; walking
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156015 (URN)10.1002/pri.1744 (DOI)000459566500004 ()30209845 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85053302585 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-04-02 Created: 2019-04-02 Last updated: 2021-04-02Bibliographically approved
Westerlind, B., Östgren, C. J., Mölstad, S., Midlöv, P. & Hägg, S. (2019). Use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics is associated with falls in nursing home residents: a longitudinal cohort study. Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, 31(8), 1078-1095
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics is associated with falls in nursing home residents: a longitudinal cohort study
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2019 (English)In: Aging Clinical and Experimental Research, ISSN 1594-0667, E-ISSN 1720-8319, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1078-1095Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Falls and related injuries are common among older people, and several drug classes are considered to increase fall risk.

Aims

This study aimed to investigate the association between the use of certain drug classes and falls in older nursing home residents in Sweden, and relate these to different age groups.

Methods

Information on falls that occurred in the previous year and regular use of possible fall risk drugs including non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (zopiclone and zolpidem) was collected from 331 nursing home residents during 2008–2011. Over the following 6 months, the occurrence of serious falls, requiring a physician visit or hospital care, was registered. Association between serious falls and drug use was compared between an older (≥ 85 years) and a younger group.

Results

An increased fall risk (Downton Fall Risk Index ≥ 3) was found in 93% of the study subjects (aged 65–101 years). Baseline data indicated an association between falls that occurred in the previous year and regular use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (p = 0.005), but not with the other studied drug classes. During the following 6 months, an association between use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics and serious falls in the older group (p = 0.017, odds ratio 4.311) was found. No association was found between the other studied drug classes and serious falls.

Discussion

These results indicate an association between falls and the use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics, compounds that previously have been considered generally well-tolerated in older people.

Conclusions

Caution is advocated when using non-benzodiazepine hypnotics regularly in older people living in nursing homes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2019
Keywords
Accidental falls, Frail elderly, Nursing homes, Hypnotics and sedatives, Adverse effects, Longitudinal study
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Geriatrics Pharmacology and Toxicology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156240 (URN)10.1007/s40520-018-1056-0 (DOI)000477664800007 ()30341643 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055751099 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies:  Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); Futurum-Academy of Health and Care, Region Jonkoping County

Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2021-10-04Bibliographically approved
Sjöholm, H., Hägg, S., Nyberg, L. & Kammerlind, A.-S. (2018). Reliability of test procedures for postural reactions in people with acute stroke. International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 25(11), 576-586
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reliability of test procedures for postural reactions in people with acute stroke
2018 (English)In: International Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1741-1645, E-ISSN 1759-779X, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 576-586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Regaining and maintaining balance requires postural reactions such as righting reactions, equilibrium reactions, and protective reactions. There is a lack of uniform, standardised, and reliable testing procedures for postural reactions. The aim of the present study was to examine the intra- And interrater reliability of a newly developed postural reactions assessment for use in people with acute stroke. Methods: The Postural Reactions Test was developed based on the literature, on previous tests, and on input from an expert panel. A total of 10 physiotherapists assessed a total of 20 video recordings of people with acute stroke performing each postural reaction. These assessments were carried out on two occasions at least 2 weeks apart. The study thus included 400 ratings. Findings: For intrarater reliability, the overall proportion of agreement was 86 - 93% for the different postural reactions. For interrater reliability, the most common score for each participant and the number of physiotherapists giving that score were noted. A median of 9-10 out of 10 physiotherapists scored the same value. Conclusions: The results indicate that the Postural Reactions Test can be used to reliably assess function in people with acute stroke and that the test can complement the existing assessments for people with affected postural control

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mark Allen Group, 2018
Keywords
Postural reactions, Reliability, Reproducibility of results, Stroke
National Category
Physiotherapy
Research subject
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-164527 (URN)10.12968/ijtr.2018.25.11.576 (DOI)000449507100003 ()2-s2.0-85056495810 (Scopus ID)
Note

Validerad;2018;Nivå 2;2018-11-29 (inah)

Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2020-03-20 Last updated: 2021-04-02
Skoglund, K., Richter, J., Olsson-Stromberg, U., Bergquist, J., Aluthgedara, W., Ubhayasekera, S. J., . . . Green, H. (2016). In Vivo Cytochrome P450 3A Isoenzyme Activity and Pharmacokinetics of Imatinib in Relation to Therapeutic Outcome in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, 38(2), 230-238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>In Vivo Cytochrome P450 3A Isoenzyme Activity and Pharmacokinetics of Imatinib in Relation to Therapeutic Outcome in Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
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2016 (English)In: Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, ISSN 0163-4356, E-ISSN 1536-3694, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 230-238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A) isoenzyme metabolic activity varies between individuals and is therefore a possible candidate of influence on the therapeutic outcome of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor imatinib in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of CYP3A metabolic activity on the plasma concentration and outcome of imatinib in patients with CML. Methods: Forty-three patients with CML were phenotyped for CYP3A activity using quinine as a probe drug and evaluated for clinical response parameters. Plasma concentrations of imatinib and its main metabolite, CGP74588, were determined using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Results: Patients with optimal response to imatinib after 12 months of therapy did not differ in CYP3A activity compared to nonoptimal responders (quinine metabolic ratio of 14.69 and 14.70, respectively; P = 0.966). Neither the imatinib plasma concentration nor the CGP74588/imatinib ratio was significantly associated with CYP3A activity. Conclusions: The CYP3A activity does not influence imatinib plasma concentrations or the therapeutic outcome. These results indicate that although imatinib is metabolized by CYP3A enzymes, this activity is not the rate-limiting step in imatinib metabolism and excretion. Future studies should focus on other pharmacokinetic processes so as to identify the major contributor to patient variability in imatinib plasma concentrations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, 2016
Keywords
pharmacokinetics; chronic myeloid leukemia; imatinib; CGP74588; CYP3A
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129678 (URN)10.1097/FTD.0000000000000268 (DOI)000376938000006 ()26693810 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council; Swedish Cancer Society; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Novartis

Available from: 2016-06-27 Created: 2016-06-23 Last updated: 2020-08-18
Tjäderborn, M., Jönsson, A. K., Zverkova Sandstrom, T., Ahlner, J. & Hägg, S. (2016). Non-prescribed use of psychoactive prescription drugs among drug-impaired drivers in Sweden. Drug And Alcohol Dependence, 161, 77-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Non-prescribed use of psychoactive prescription drugs among drug-impaired drivers in Sweden
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2016 (English)In: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 161, p. 77-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To determine the prevalence of non-prescribed drug use among subjects suspected of drug impaired driving with a psychoactive prescription drug, and to identify associated factors. Methods: Subjects investigated for drug-impaired driving in Sweden during 2006-2009 with a confirmed intake of diazepam, flunitrazepam, tramadol, zolpidem or zopiclone were identified using the Swedish Forensic Toxicology Database. Information on dispensed prescription drugs was retrieved from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register. Non-prescribed use was our outcome, defined as a psychoactive prescription drug intake confirmed by toxicological analysis in a subject by whom it was not dispensed in the 12 months preceding the sampling. Prevalence proportions were calculated for each drug and logistic regression was used to identify associated factors. Results: In total, 2225 subjects were included. The median age (range) was 34 (15-80) years and 1864 (83.8%) subjects were male. Non-prescribed use was found in 1513 subjects (58.7%); for flunitrazepam 103 (76.3%), diazepam 1098 (74.1%), tramadol 192 (40.3%), zopiclone 60 (29.7%), and zolpidem 60 (21.2%) subjects, respectively. Younger age and multiple-substance use were associated with non-prescribed use, whereas ongoing treatment with other psychoactive drugs was negatively associated with non prescribed use. Conclusions: Non-prescribed use of psychoactive prescription drugs was common in subjects suspected of drug-impaired driving and was more frequent for benzodiazepines and tramadol compared to zolpidem and zopiclone. The young and multi-substance users were more likely, whereas subjects with ongoing prescribed treatment with other psychoactive drugs were less likely, to use non-prescribed drugs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2016
Keywords
Prescription drug diversion; Non-prescribed use; Drug-impaired driving; Drug dispensing; Pharmacoepidemiology
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127559 (URN)10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.01.031 (DOI)000373419100011 ()26875672 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden [LIO-131751]; Forensic Science Centre, Sweden [CFV 121218]; Linkoping University, Sweden [LIU 2009-01356]

Available from: 2016-05-04 Created: 2016-05-03 Last updated: 2017-04-24
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5137-8420

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