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Persson, Karin
Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Persson, I. & Persson, K. (2013). About using ficion and film in gender education. Journal of Contemporary Medical Education, 1(2), 100-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>About using ficion and film in gender education
2013 (English)In: Journal of Contemporary Medical Education, ISSN 2146-8354, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 100-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gender, male and female has always been of great interest and present in almost all fiction and films, within different perspectives. Ever since the dawn of time, man has taught ethics, morals, values and existential questions using fictional stories in oral and later in written form. The aim of analyzing the concept of male and female from fiction and film is to reach deeper insight and understanding of human beings with special reference to gender in both individual, group and community perspective. The general aim is to create security in our gender and professional roles. Whole or parts of books and films are used, chosen according to the specific learning outcome. Different aspects are then discussed in lectures, seminars or groups. Aspects include projections, culture and behavior. Students learn to reach a deeper insight and understanding of gender regarding behavior, communication, attitudes, values, culture and ethnicity. Peeling off the illusion of male and female created by our social structure, and making our values and prejudices conscious, we might discern the eternally human, the inner core of being human, regardless of sex. Fiction and film make conscious behavior, communication and gender, and merge cognition and emotions. This way of teaching may lead to better treatment of patients by health care personnel

Keywords
Fiction, film, gender, higher education
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-95613 (URN)10.5455/jcme.20130220110635 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-07-12 Created: 2013-07-12 Last updated: 2014-11-12Bibliographically approved
Ljungberg, L. U., Alehagen, U., De Basso, R., Persson, K., Dahlström, U. & Länne, T. (2013). Circulating angiotensin-converting enzyme is associated with left ventricular dysfunction, but not with central aortic hemodynamics [Letter to the editor]. International Journal of Cardiology, 166(2), 540-541
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating angiotensin-converting enzyme is associated with left ventricular dysfunction, but not with central aortic hemodynamics
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2013 (English)In: International Journal of Cardiology, ISSN 0167-5273, E-ISSN 1874-1754, Vol. 166, no 2, p. 540-541Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
ACE; Central blood pressure; Heart failure; Polymorphism; Renin–angiotensin system
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86770 (URN)10.1016/j.ijcard.2012.09.191 (DOI)000319510200057 ()23084549 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-01-03 Created: 2013-01-03 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Ljungberg, L., Persson, K., Eriksson, A., Green, H. & Whiss, P. (2013). Effects of nicotine, its metabolites and tobacco extracts on human platelet function in vitro. Toxicology in Vitro, 27(2), 932-938
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of nicotine, its metabolites and tobacco extracts on human platelet function in vitro
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2013 (English)In: Toxicology in Vitro, ISSN 0887-2333, E-ISSN 1879-3177, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 932-938Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. The cardiovascular effects of smoking are probably multifactorial, including effects on platelets. Previous reports investigating the effects of nicotine and tobacco on platelet function are inconsistent.

The present study investigated in vitro effects of nicotine, its major metabolites, tobacco extracts and extract of tobacco-free snuff on human platelets.

None of the metabolites cotinine, cotinine-N-oxide, nicotine-1′-N-oxide or trans-3′-hydroxycotinine (0.1–10 μM) affected platelet aggregation or P-selectin expression. Nicotine (10 μM) weakly increased platelet aggregation, whereas trans-3′-hydroxycotinine (0.1 μM) and nicotine-1′-N-oxide (1–10 μM) weakly inhibited adhesion to fibrinogen. To elucidate the influence of other tobacco compounds, we investigated the impact of moist tobacco and smoke extracts on platelet function. Filtered extracts of oral snuff, cigarette smoke and tobacco free snuff inhibited platelet adhesion concentration-dependently. The inhibitory effects of tobacco extracts on platelet adhesion were independent of nicotine content and the nitric-oxide-pathway and not mediated through a platelet-nicotine-receptor.

Taken together, tobacco extracts inhibit platelet activation during short-term in vitro challenge. As only limited effects of nicotine and nicotine metabolites were seen, the tobacco-induced platelet inhibition are likely induced by other compounds present in tobacco and tobacco free snuff.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Cigarette smoke, Moist tobacco, Nicotine metabolite, Platelet adhesion, Platelet aggregation, Snuff
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91549 (URN)10.1016/j.tiv.2013.01.004 (DOI)000316642800050 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council||Cardiovascular Inflammatory Research Centre (CIRC, Linkoping University, Sweden)||Halsofonden (Linkoping, Sweden)||County Council of Ostergotland (Linkoping, Sweden)||Eleanora Demeroutis Foundation for Cardiovascular Research (Linkoping, Sweden)||Medical Advisory Council (Swedish Match Northern Europe AB)||

Available from: 2013-04-26 Created: 2013-04-26 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Ljungberg, L., Alehagen, U., De Basso, R., Persson, K., Dahlström, U. & Länne, T. (2011). Circulating angiotensin-converting enzyme levels are associated with left ventricular dysfunction, but not with central aortic blood pressure, aortic augmentation or pulse pressure amplification.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating angiotensin-converting enzyme levels are associated with left ventricular dysfunction, but not with central aortic blood pressure, aortic augmentation or pulse pressure amplification
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2011 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study aimed to explore the link between angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), and left ventricular (LV) function and central hemodynamics.

Methods and Results: The study population consisted of 672 subjects (322 men and 350 women) aged 69-87 years. LV function was evaluated semi-quantitatively by visual estimation using echocardiography. Central aortic blood pressure, aortic augmentation and pulse pressure amplification were determined in a sub-group of 422 subjects by the use of the SphygmoCor system. ACE genotype was determined by PCR and circulating ACE levels were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

LV dysfunction was associated with higher levels of circulating ACE compared to subjects with normal LV function (p=0.007). This association remained after adjustment for factors previously shown to affect circulating ACE (ACE-genotype, age, diabetes and smoking) (p=0.036). There was a significant association between ACE level and degree of LV dysfunction (p=0.019). However, there was no association of ACE genotype or circulating ACE with central aortic blood pressure, aortic augmentation or pulse pressure amplification.

Conclusion: Subjects with LV dysfunction have higher levels of circulating ACE compared to subjects with normal LV function. ACE might play a role in the pathogenesis of LV dysfunction and our data indicates a direct effect on the heart rather than affecting central blood pressure.

Keywords
ACE, Heart Failure, Polymorphism, Renin-Angiotensin System, Central hemodynamics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67214 (URN)
Available from: 2011-04-04 Created: 2011-04-04 Last updated: 2017-03-27Bibliographically approved
Persson, I. A., Persson, K., Hägg, S. & Andersson, R. G. (2011). Effects of cocoa extract and dark chocolate on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in human endothelial cells and healthy volunteers--a nutrigenomics perspective.. Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, 57(1), 44-50
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of cocoa extract and dark chocolate on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in human endothelial cells and healthy volunteers--a nutrigenomics perspective.
2011 (English)In: Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology, ISSN 0160-2446, E-ISSN 1533-4023, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 44-50Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evidence suggests that cocoa from the bean of Theobroma cacao L. has beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if cocoa extract and dark chocolate influence angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) in human endothelial cells (in vitro) and in healthy volunteers (in vivo). ACE activity was analyzed with a commercial radioenzymatic assay and measured in human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) after 10 minutes of incubation with cocoa extract. NO was measured after 24 hours of incubation. ACE activity and NO were measured at baseline and after 30, 60, and 180 minutes in 16 healthy volunteers after a single intake of 75 g of dark chocolate containing 72% cocoa. Significant inhibition of ACE activity (P < 0.01) and significant increase of NO (P < 0.001) were seen in HUVEC. In the study subjects, a significant inhibition of ACE activity (mean 18%) 3 hours after intake of dark chocolate was seen, but no significant change in NO was seen. According to ACE genotype, significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen after 3 hours in individuals with genotype insertion/insertion and deletion/deletion (mean 21% and 28%, respectively). Data suggest that intake of dark chocolate containing high amount of cocoa inhibits ACE activity in vitro and in vivo.

Keywords
cocoa, dark chocolate, angiotensin-converting enzyme, genotyping, nitric oxide
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66332 (URN)10.1097/FJC.0b013e3181fe62e3 (DOI)000286178000007 ()20966764 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-03-11 Created: 2011-03-11 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Björck, H., Eriksson, P., Alehagen, U., Debasso, R., Ljungberg, L., Persson, K., . . . Länne, T. (2011). Gender-Specific Association of the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 4G/5G Polymorphism With Central Arterial Blood Pressure. American Journal of Hypertension, 24(7), 802-808
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender-Specific Association of the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 4G/5G Polymorphism With Central Arterial Blood Pressure
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2011 (English)In: American Journal of Hypertension, ISSN 0895-7061, E-ISSN 1941-7225, Vol. 24, no 7, p. 802-808Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND The functional plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) 4G/5G polymorphism has previously been associated with hypertension. In recent years, central blood pressure, rather than brachial has been argued a better measure of cardiovascular damage and clinical outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of the 4G/5G polymorphism on central arterial blood pressure in a cohort of elderly individuals. METHODS We studied 410 individuals, 216 men and 194 women, aged 70-88. Central pressures and pulse waveforms were calculated from the radial artery pressure waveform by the use of the SphygmoCor system and a generalized transfer function. Brachial pressure was recorded using oscillometric technique (Dinamap, Critikon, Tampa, FL). PAI-1 antigen was determined in plasma. RESULTS The results showed that central pressures were higher in women carrying the PAI-1 4G/4G genotype compared to female carriers of the 5G/5G genotype, (P = 0.025, P = 0.002, and P = 0.002 for central systolic-, diastolic-, and mean arterial pressure, respectively). The association remained after adjustment for potentially confounding factors related to hypertension. No association of the PAI-1 genotype with blood pressure was found in men. Multiple regression analysis revealed an association between PAI-1 genotype and plasma PAI-1 levels (P = 0.048). CONCLUSIONS Our findings show a gender-specific association of the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism with central arterial blood pressure. The genotype effect was independent of other risk factors related to hypertension, suggesting that impaired fibrinolytic potential may play an important role in the development of central hypertension in women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2011
Keywords
aorta; arterial stiffness; blood pressure; genetics; hypertension; pressure pulse wave
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69831 (URN)10.1038/ajh.2011.63 (DOI)000291901100014 ()
Note
Original Publication: Hanna Björck, Per Eriksson, Urban Alehagen, Rachel Debasso, Liza Ljungberg, Karin Persson, Ulf Dahlström and Toste Länne, Gender-Specific Association of the Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 4G/5G Polymorphism With Central Arterial Blood Pressure, 2011, American Journal of Hypertension, (24), 7, 802-808. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ajh.2011.63 Copyright: Nature Publishing Group http://npg.nature.com/ Available from: 2011-08-10 Created: 2011-08-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Ljungberg, L., De Basso, R., Alehagen, U., Björck, H., Persson, K., Dahlström, U. & Länne, T. (2011). Impaired abdominal aortic wall integrity in elderly men carrying the angiotensin-converting enzyme D allele. European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, 42(3), 309-316
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impaired abdominal aortic wall integrity in elderly men carrying the angiotensin-converting enzyme D allele
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2011 (English)In: European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, ISSN 1078-5884, E-ISSN 1532-2165, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 309-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: A genetic polymorphism in the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE I/D polymorphism) has been associated with abdominal aortic aneurysm and a link between aortic aneurysm and aortic stiffness has been suggested. The aim of this study was to explore the links between ACE I/D polymorphism, circulating ACE, and abdominal aortic wall integrity as reflected by abdominal aortic wall stiffness.

Material: The study population consisted of 406 subjects (212 men and 194 women) aged 70-88 years.

Methods: The mechanical properties of the abdominal aorta were determined 3-4 cm proximal to the aortic bifurcation using a Wall Track System. ACE-genotype was determined by PCR followed by gel electrophoresis, and circulating ACE level was measured by ELISA.

Results: Men carrying the ACE D allele had lower distensibility coefficient than II carriers (ID/DD 8.09 vs II 10.38, P=0.017). Multiple regression analyses showed additional associations between the ACE D allele and increased stiffness β as well as reduced cross-sectional compliance.

Conclusion: This study showed that men carrying the ACE D allele have stiffer abdominal aortas compared to II carriers. Deranged abdominal aortic stiffness indicates impaired vessel wall integrity, which along with other local predisposing factors, may be of importance in aneurysmal disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2011
Keywords
Aorta; Arterial stiffness; Distensibility; Gene polymorphism; Mechanical properties
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67213 (URN)10.1016/j.ejvs.2011.04.010 (DOI)000295061800007 ()
Available from: 2011-04-04 Created: 2011-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Ljungberg, L., Alehagen, U., Länne, T., Björck, H., De Basso, R., Dahlström, U. & Persson, K. (2011). The association between circulating angiotensin-converting enzyme and cardiovascular risk in the elderly: A cross-sectional study.. jraas. Journal of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, 12(3), 281-289
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between circulating angiotensin-converting enzyme and cardiovascular risk in the elderly: A cross-sectional study.
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2011 (English)In: jraas. Journal of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, ISSN 1470-3203, E-ISSN 1752-8976, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 281-289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: A polymorphism in the angiotensin-converting enzyme gene (ACE I/D polymorphism) has been associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This polymorphism affects the level of circulating ACE, but there is great individual variation, even between those with the same genotype. Few previous studies have investigated the link between circulating ACE and cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to investigate this association, and to examine the relationship between ACE level, ACE genotype and CVD.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study population consisted of 322 men and 350 women aged 69-87. Plasma ACE level was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and ACE genotype was analysed using PCR followed by gel electrophoresis.

RESULTS: In men, ACE levels increased with increasing number of cardiovascular risk factors (p = 0.003). There was a significant association in men between increased ACE level and both diabetes (p = 0.007) and smoking (p = 0.037).

CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that cardiovascular risk factors (such as smoking and diabetes) are associated with higher levels of circulating ACE in men. High ACE levels may represent one of the cellular mechanisms involved in producing the vascular damage associated with cardiovascular risk factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE, 2011
Keywords
Cardiovascular risk factors, dibetes, endothelium, genetics, smoking
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-67208 (URN)10.1177/1470320310391326 (DOI)000294450600019 ()21273224 (PubMedID)
Note
Funding Agencies|Cardiovascular Inflammatory Research Center, Linkoping, Sweden||Swedish Research Council|
1216
|Elanora Demeroutis Foundation, Linkoping, Sweden|
LIO-28471
|Goljes Memorial Foundation, Sweden|
LA2009-0119
|Medical Research Council of South East Sweden|
FORSS-34931
|Available from: 2011-04-04 Created: 2011-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Persson, I.-L. A., Persson, K., Hägg, S. & Andersson, R. G. (2010). Effects of green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in healthy volunteers. Public Health Nutrition, 13(5), 730-737
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in healthy volunteers
2010 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 730-737Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Tea has been reported to reduce cardiovascular mortality, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. The aim of the current project was to investigate the effect of green tea (Japanese Sencha), black tea (Indian Assam B.O.P.) and Rooibos tea (South Africa) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO). DESIGN: Seventeen healthy volunteers received a single oral dose of 400 ml green tea, black tea or Rooibos tea in a randomized, three-phase, crossover study. ACE activity and NO concentration were measured (at 0, 30, 60 and 180 min) in all phases. ACE activity was analysed by means of a commercial radioenzymatic assay. Nitrite was analysed as a marker of NO concentration. In addition, ACE genotype was determined using a PCR method. RESULTS: Oral intake of a single dose of Rooibos tea significantly inhibited ACE activity after 30 min (P < 0.01) and after 60 min (P < 0.05). A significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen with green tea for the ACE II genotype 30 min after intake of the tea (P < 0.05) and for the ACE ID genotype 60 min after intake (P < 0.05). A significant inhibition of ACE activity was also seen with Rooibos tea for the ACE II genotype 60 min after intake (P < 0.05). No significant effect on NO concentration was seen. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that green tea and Rooibos tea may have cardiovascular effects through inhibition of ACE activity.

Keywords
Tea, Angiotensin-converting enxyme, Nitric oxide
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-55073 (URN)10.1017/S1368980010000170 (DOI)000277379500018 ()20144258 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-04-28 Created: 2010-04-28 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Felixsson, E., Persson, I.-L. A. L., Eriksson, A. C. & Persson, K. (2010). Horse chestnut extract contracts bovine vessels and affects human platelet aggregation through 5-HT(2A) receptors: an in vitro study. Phytotherapy Research, 24(9), 1297-1301
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Horse chestnut extract contracts bovine vessels and affects human platelet aggregation through 5-HT(2A) receptors: an in vitro study
2010 (English)In: Phytotherapy Research, ISSN 0951-418X, E-ISSN 1099-1573, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 1297-1301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Extract from seeds and bark of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L) is used as an herbal medicine against chronic venous insufficiency. The effect and mechanism of action on veins, arteries, and platelets are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of action of horse chestnut on the contraction of bovine mesenteric veins and arteries, and human platelet aggregation. Contraction studies showed that horse chestnut extract dose-dependently contracted both veins and arteries, with the veins being the most sensitive. Contraction of both veins and arteries were significantly inhibited by the 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonist ketanserin. No effect on contraction was seen with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin, the alpha(1) receptor antagonist prazosin or the angiotensin AT(1) receptor antagonist saralasin neither in veins nor arteries. ADP-induced human platelet aggregation was significantly reduced by horse chestnut. A further reduction was seen with the extract in the presence of ketanserin. In conclusion, horse chestnut contraction of both veins and arteries is, at least partly, mediated through 5-HT(2A) receptors. Human platelet aggregation is reduced by horse chestnut. The clinical importance of these findings concerning clinical use, possible adverse effects, and drug interactions remains to be investigated. Copyright (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Keywords
arterial contraction; 5-HT; horse chestnut extract; platelet aggregation; venous contraction.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59047 (URN)10.1002/ptr.3103 (DOI)20148408 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2010-09-07 Created: 2010-09-07 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
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