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Drott, J., Fomichov, V., Starkhammar, H., Börjeson, S., Kjellgren, K. I. & Berterö, C. (2019). Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxic Side Effects and Their Impact on Daily Activities. Cancer Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxaliplatin-Induced Neurotoxic Side Effects and Their Impact on Daily Activities
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2019 (English)In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Oxaliplatin (OXA) is frequently used in the treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, and OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects are common. Reports on real-time patient-reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on the patient's daily activities are sparse in existing studies. Objective: The aim of this study was to identify and assess patient-reported OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects and their impact on the patient's daily activities, during and after chemotherapy. Methods: In a multicenter prospective longitudinal study, 46 chemo-naïve patients with colorectal cancer treated with postoperative adjuvant OXA-based chemotherapy were monitored during treatment and at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month follow-ups. Patients were recruited from September 2013 to June 2016. In total, 370 Oxaliplatin-Associated Neurotoxicity Questionnaire responses were available for analysis. A mobile phone-based system was used to receive real-time assessments. Results: All patients reported neurotoxic side effects and impact on daily activities during treatment. The side effects changed in character and body location over time and had an impact on the daily activities. Conclusions: The high prevalence of OXA-induced neurotoxic side effects significantly interfered with the patients' daily activities. We found significant differences between baseline data and follow-up time points for neurotoxicity, and the patients had not returned to baseline after 1 year. Implications for Practice: The real-time assessment using mobile phone technology seems to be a valuable tool for monitoring patient-reported neurotoxicity and interventions for tailored care. Effectively identifying neurotoxicity and its impact on the patient's daily activities is important in supportive cancer care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019
Keywords
Cancer nursing; Chemotherapy; Colorectal cancer; Daily activities, mHealth; Neurotoxicity; Patient-reported outcomes; Symptom control
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-154883 (URN)10.1097/ncc.0000000000000674 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-03-04 Created: 2019-03-04 Last updated: 2019-06-04
Pihl Lesnovska, K., Hollman Frisman, G., Hjortswang, H. & Börjeson, S. (2016). Critical situations in daily life as experienced by patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Gastroenterology Nursing, 39(3), 195-203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical situations in daily life as experienced by patients with inflammatory bowel disease
2016 (English)In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 195-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic and have a fluctuating clinical course that impacts daily life. Daily life with a chronic disease involves thinking and worrying about the limitations that chronic disease causes. Knowledge about how patients who suffer from IBD manage critical incidents in daily life is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe how patients living with IBD experience critical incidents in daily life in relation to their disease and symptoms. Thirty adult patients were interviewed focusing on critical incidents in daily life. Data were analyzed using the critical incident technique. The study comprised 224 critical incidents and was grouped into 21 subcategories and 5 categories: losing bowel control, having a body that smells, being unable to meet own and others' expectations, not being believed or seen, and experiencing frustration due to side effects and ineffective treatment. These categories formed one main area describing the overall result "The bowels rule life." The uncertain nature of IBD created critical incidents in which the bowel ruled life, causing patients to avoid social interaction. It also placed considerable demands on the family and sometimes had a negative effect on the afflicted person's career.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126621 (URN)10.1097/SGA.0000000000000211 (DOI)000380804500004 ()26870902 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: We acknowledge funding from the County Council of Ostergotland.

Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2017-11-01Bibliographically approved
Loorents, V., Rosell, J., Salgado Willner, H. & Börjeson, S. (2016). Health-related quality of life up to 1 year after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). SpringerPlus, 5(1), Article ID 669.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life up to 1 year after radiotherapy in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC)
2016 (English)In: SpringerPlus, E-ISSN 2193-1801, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 669Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Detailed symptom specific descriptions of health-related quality of life (HRQOL), using validated questionnaires in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) are sparse. The aim of the present study was to investigate HRQOL in patients with HNC up to 1 year after radiotherapy (RT), using two standardised questionnaires.

Methods

The data for the present study was originally collected in a randomised, prospective study. Forty-seven patients from two RT clinics in Sweden were included to investigate the secondary aim: HRQOL. Data was recorded at baseline, completion of RT, and 3, 6, 12 months after completed RT, using the questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30-version 3 and the disease-specific module EORTC QLQ-H&N35.

Results

Most symptoms and functions deteriorated significantly by the end of RT, improved gradually by 3 and 6 months and reached baseline levels at 12 months after completed RT. However, 1 year after completed RT there were remaining significant problems in senses, dry mouth and sticky saliva.

Conclusions

Radiation therapy affects health-related quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer, both in the short and long term. Caregivers need management strategies for early detection and treatment of specific problems throughout the treatment period to help in the prevention of long-term symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2016
Keywords
Health-related quality of life, Head and neck cancer, EORTC QLQ C30, QLQ-H&N35, Trismus
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128865 (URN)10.1186/s40064-016-2295-1 (DOI)000377606500002 ()
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Cancer Society; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; Department of Radiation Oncology at the University Hospital in Linkoping; County Hospital in Jonkoping; Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Linkoping

Available from: 2016-06-07 Created: 2016-06-02 Last updated: 2018-03-22Bibliographically approved
Frödin, U., Lotfi, K., Fomichov, V., Juliusson, G. & Börjeson, S. (2015). Frequent and long-term follow-up of health-related quality of life following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. European Journal of Cancer Care, 24(6), 898-910
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frequent and long-term follow-up of health-related quality of life following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation
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2015 (English)In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 898-910Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Health-related quality of life (HRQL) was evaluated in 94 patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) after myeloablative (MAC, n=18) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC, n=76). HRQL was assessed with the EORTC QLQ C-30 during the inpatient period as well as during the following 3years, i.e. at baseline and 12 times thereafter. Functional status and global quality of life decreased from baseline to weeks 2 and 3, especially role and social functions. Symptoms increased significantly during the first 3weeks, particularly appetite loss, nausea and vomiting, diarrhoea and fatigue. It took at least 1year for HRQL to return to the baseline level. The only function that improved significantly 3years after HSCT was role function. Patients treated with MAC experienced significantly worse HRQL at baseline than patients treated with RIC, as well as more pain, sleep disturbance and appetite loss in weeks 3 and 4. Patients with extensive chronic graft-versus-host disease experienced reduced HRQL. These results provide a clinically useful overview of patients HRQL during and after HSCT and indicate when they require increased support. The results demonstrate the importance of close follow-ups during the first year after HSCT to improve preventive or supportive interventions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
quality of life; symptom; stem cell transplantation
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122649 (URN)10.1111/ecc.12350 (DOI)000363466200014 ()26156141 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-11-16 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Johnson, C., Wilhelmsson, S., Börjeson, S. & Lindberg, M. (2015). Improvement of communication and interpersonal competence in telenursing - development of a self-assessment tool. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 24(11-12), 1489-1501
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvement of communication and interpersonal competence in telenursing - development of a self-assessment tool
2015 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 11-12, p. 1489-1501Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectivesThe aim of this study was to develop a self-assessment tool aiming to raise telenurses awareness of their communication and interpersonal competence, and highlight areas in need of improvement. BackgroundSeveral studies have revealed the need for development of communication competence in telenursing. Structured analyses of conversations with patients/callers, is one way to increase telenurses awareness of their unique communication and interpersonal competence. DesignInstrument development, Validation assessment using the method Content Validity Index. MethodThe process to determine content validity was done in two stages; the development stage and the assessment stage. The development stage started with a literature search. The assessment stage was separated into two phases, assessment by an expert group and assessment and test by telenurses. The telenurses also participated in consensus discussions. ResultsA telenursing self-assessment tool with 58 items was developed. The items were sorted into five sections according to the nursing process. ConclusionThis study describes the thorough development process of the telenursing self-assessment tool to be used by telenurses in order to become aware of their unique communication and interpersonal competence when analysing their own conversations with patients/callers. As a formative tool it is meant to provide self-direction, feedback and coaching, and create learning opportunities. Relevance to clinical practiceThe self-assessment tool helps the telenurse to follow the nursing process, to be patient-centred, and it is meant to provide self-direction, feedback, and coaching, as well as create learning opportunities. The tool can contribute to the development of communication and interpersonal competence in telephone advice nursing. Further development of the tool may provide an objective scoring instrument for evaluating communication training and education in the field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley: 12 months, 2015
Keywords
clinical competence; communication; hotlines; instrument development; nurse-patient relations; self-assessment; telenursing; triage
National Category
Communication Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119577 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12705 (DOI)000355331300006 ()25393698 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|National Medical Advisory Service Ltd (in Swedish Sjukvardsradgivningen SVR AB); County Council of Ostergotland, Sweden

Available from: 2015-06-23 Created: 2015-06-22 Last updated: 2019-01-04
Drott, J., Starkhammar, H., Börjeson, S. & Berterö, C. (2014). Identifying Oxaliplatin induced Neurotoxicity in Medical records - strengthening compassion. In: : . Paper presented at 18th ICCN (International Conference on Cancer Nursing), September 7-11, 2014, Panama City, Panama.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying Oxaliplatin induced Neurotoxicity in Medical records - strengthening compassion
2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110636 (URN)
Conference
18th ICCN (International Conference on Cancer Nursing), September 7-11, 2014, Panama City, Panama
Available from: 2014-09-17 Created: 2014-09-17 Last updated: 2016-09-26
Drott, J., Starkhammar, H., Börjeson, S. & Berterö, C. (2014). Oxaliplatin induced neurotoxicity among patients with colorectal cancer: documentation in medical records - a pilot study. Open Journal of Nursing, 4, 265-274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxaliplatin induced neurotoxicity among patients with colorectal cancer: documentation in medical records - a pilot study
2014 (English)In: Open Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2162-5336, E-ISSN 2162-5344, Vol. 4, p. 265-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) can have chemotherapy with oxaliplatin postoperatively.Oxaliplatin can cause acute and chronic neurotoxicity. It is important to be aware of neurotoxicside effects so they can be documented and action taken at an early stage. The study aimed toidentify and explore neurotoxic side effects documented in the medical records of patients withcolorectal cancer treated with oxaliplatin-based adjuvant chemotherapy. Data in this study weremedical records; presenting documentation about patients treated at the University Hospital inthe south of Sweden between 2009 and 2010. A summative content analysis approach was used toexplore the neurotoxic side effects. Identification and quantification of the content of medical recordswere carried out by using a study-specific protocol. “Cold sensitivity” and “tingling in thehands” were the most frequently documented neurotoxicity-related terms in the medical records.This identification was followed by interpretation. Three categories were identified in the interpretivepart of the study: acute, chronic, and degree of neurotoxicity. The results show the importanceof awareness of neurotoxic side effects so that they can be documented and action taken atan early stage. The documentation could be more reliable if patient-reported structured measurementswere used, combined with free descriptions in the medical records. Being able to followthe progression of the symptoms during and after treatment would improve patient’s safety andalso quality of life. The protocol that we developed and used in this review of medical records maybe helpful to structure the documentation in the electronic system for documentation of neurotoxicityside effects.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2014
Keywords
Adjuvant Oxaliplatin Chemotherapy, Colorectal Cancer, Medical Record Review, Neurotoxicity
National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105867 (URN)10.4236/ojn.2014.44031 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-04-11 Created: 2014-04-11 Last updated: 2018-05-15Bibliographically approved
Loorents, V., Rosell, J., Karlsson, C., Lidback, M., Hultman, K. & Börjeson, S. (2014). Prophylactic training for the prevention of radiotherapy-induced trismus - a randomised study. Acta Oncologica, 53(4), 530-538
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prophylactic training for the prevention of radiotherapy-induced trismus - a randomised study
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2014 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 530-538Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Radiotherapy-induced trismus (RTIT) is a debilitating condition without any proven effective treatment. This study investigates the effectiveness of prophylactic training to prevent RTIT during and up to 12 months after completed RT in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC), also investigating the incidence of RTIT.

METHODS:

Sixty-six consecutive patients from two RT clinics in Sweden were randomised into one of two groups: training with TheraBite(®) Jaw Motion Rehabilitation System(™) or a control group. Maximum interincisal openings (MIO) were recorded at baseline and once a week during treatment, three, six and 12 months after completed RT. Training frequency was recorded by patients in a log book.

RESULTS:

There were no significant differences in MIO between the intervention and control groups at any of the measurement points. Patients in both groups maintained their normal variation in MIO at 12 months after completed RT. A small group of patients in the control group had a 17% mean decrease in MIO by week 6 compared to baseline and improved their MIO by using the training programme. There was a significant mean difference in MIO from baseline to week 6 (3 mm, p = 0.018), and month 6 (2.7 mm, p = 0.040), for patients receiving 3D conformal radiotherapy. There was a significant difference in MIO between patients treated with RT and concurrent chemotherapy compared to patients with RT only at 12 months (p = 0.033).

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with HNC undergoing high dose RT do not need to be burdened with an intense prophylactic training programme during RT and up to 12 months after completed RT. MIO measurements during RT and up to 12 months after completed RT are recommended to identify a small risk group who are an exception and may need a training programme.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
National Category
Health Sciences Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106119 (URN)10.3109/0284186X.2014.892211 (DOI)000333350400012 ()24635110 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-04-25 Created: 2014-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Pettersson, G., Berterö, C., Unosson, M. & Börjeson, S. (2014). Symptom prevalence, frequency, severity, and distress during chemotherapy for patients with colorectal cancer. Supportive Care in Cancer, 22(5), 1171-1179
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom prevalence, frequency, severity, and distress during chemotherapy for patients with colorectal cancer
2014 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 1171-1179Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Early detection and improvements in treatment have increased survival after colorectal cancer (CRC), but studies investigating the multidimensional nature of treatment-related symptoms are rare. The aim of this study was therefore to describe the prevalence, frequency, and severity of symptoms and the distress they cause during the early treatment of patients with CRC undergoing chemotherapy.

Methods

Consecutive outpatients were asked to rate their symptoms during cycle 2 or 3 of chemotherapy, using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale.

Results

A total of 104 patients, 58 men and 46 women, evaluated their symptoms of the preceding week at one point during the treatment. The mean number of symptoms was 10.3 (SD, 7.7; range, 0–32). Highly prevalent symptoms were numbness/tingling in the hands/feet (64 %), lack of energy (62 %), feeling drowsy (49 %), and nausea (45 %). Symptoms with the highest scores for frequency, severity, and distress were lack of energy followed by difficulty in sleeping and numbness in the hands/feet. Lack of energy was noted as occurring almost constantly by 26 % and was rated as being severe or very severe by 12 % and as quite distressing or very distressing by 15 %.

Conclusions

This study shows that patients with CRC receiving chemotherapy experience several distressing symptoms early in the treatment phase. In order to provide symptom control, oncology staff should consider evaluating the patient’s symptoms early during treatment and plan adequate measures to minimize the impact of treatment-induced toxicity.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2014
Keywords
Symptoms, Symptomdistress, Colorectal cancer, Chemotherapy, MSAS
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106916 (URN)10.1007/s00520-013-2069-z (DOI)000335774600004 ()24337684 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-05-26 Created: 2014-05-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Pihl Lesnovska, K., Börjeson, S., Hjortswang, H. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2014). What do patients need to know? Living with inflammatory bowel disease. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 23(11-12), 1718-1725
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What do patients need to know? Living with inflammatory bowel disease
2014 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 11-12, p. 1718-1725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the need for knowledge as expressed by patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease.

BACKGROUND: Inflammatory bowel disease has a major impact on physical and emotional well-being, placing considerable demands on patients' management of daily activities. Although inflammatory bowel disease patients' level of knowledge about their disease has been previously studied, it is necessary to learn more about their self-expressed needs.

DESIGN: The study was designed to explore patients' need for knowledge; therefore, an inductive method was chosen.

METHODS: Thirty patients with inflammatory bowel disease were interviewed. Content analysis was used to describe their need for knowledge.

RESULTS: The analysis generated three categories and eight subcategories: (1) knowledge related to the course of the disease (subcategories: understanding causal relationships between symptoms and the disease, complications related to the disease and understanding treatment), (2) knowledge related to managing everyday life (subcategories: behaviour that enhances well-being and managing social life) and (3) difficulty understanding and assimilating information (subcategories: shifting knowledge needs, help to understand information and reasons for wanting or not wanting knowledge).

CONCLUSION: Knowledge needs were related to what to expect when living with inflammatory bowel disease in order to manage everyday life. There was a great variation in the need for knowledge, which was greatest immediately following diagnosis and during relapse.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: It is important for healthcare providers to ascertain the patients' individual knowledge needs and together with them formulate an individual care plan that gives the patient the necessary knowledge to manage their health and social life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2014
Keywords
content analysis, Crohn's disease, knowledge need and ulcerative colitis
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97578 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12321 (DOI)000335443800027 ()24004406 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-09-17 Created: 2013-09-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9786-7326

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