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Jonasson, Jon
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Publications (10 of 37) Show all publications
Magnusson, K., Appelqvist, H., Cieślar-Pobuda, A., Bäck, M., Kågedal, B., Jonasson, J., . . . Nilsson, P. R. (2015). An imidazole functionalized pentameric thiophene displays different staining patterns in normal and malignant cells. Frontiers in Chemistry, 3, Article ID 58.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An imidazole functionalized pentameric thiophene displays different staining patterns in normal and malignant cells
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2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Chemistry, E-ISSN 2296-2646, Vol. 3, article id 58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Molecular tools for fluorescent imaging of cells and their components are vital for understanding the function and activity of cells. Here, we report an imidazole functionalized pentameric oligothiophene, p-HTIm, that can be utilized for fluorescent imaging of cells. p-HTIm fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctate pattern partially co-localized with lysosomes, whereas a one-sided perinuclear Golgi associated localization of the dye was observed in malignant cells. The uptake of p-HTIm was temperature dependent and the intracellular target was reached within 1 h after staining. The ability of p-HTIm to stain cells was reduced when the imidazole side chain was chemically altered, verifying that specific imidazole side-chain functionalities are necessary for achieving the observed cellular staining. Our findings confirm that properly functionalized oligothiophenes can be utilized as fluorescent tools for vital staining of cells and that the selectivity towards distinct intracellular targets are highly dependent on the side-chain functionalities along the conjugated thiophene backbone.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2015
Keywords
Oligothiophenes, fluorescence, cells, imaging, imidazole
National Category
Clinical Medicine Chemical Sciences Medical Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121813 (URN)10.3389/fchem.2015.00058 (DOI)000373364600001 ()
Note

Vid tiden för disputation förelåg publikationen som manuskript

Funding agencies:  Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research; GeCONil [POIG.02.03.01-24-099/13]; ERC from the European Research Council

Available from: 2015-10-07 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Gréen, A., Green, H., Rehnberg, M., Svensson, A., Gunnarsson, C. & Jonasson, J. (2015). Assessment of HaloPlex Amplification for Sequence Capture and Massively Parallel Sequencing of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy-Associated Genes. Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, 17(1), 31-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of HaloPlex Amplification for Sequence Capture and Massively Parallel Sequencing of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy-Associated Genes
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, ISSN 1525-1578, E-ISSN 1943-7811, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 31-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The genetic basis of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is complex. Mutations in genes encoding components of the cardiac desmosomes have been implicated as being causally related to ARVC. Next-generation sequencing allows parallel sequencing and duplication/deletion analysis of many genes simultaneously, which is appropriate for screening of mutations in disorders with heterogeneous genetic backgrounds. We designed and validated a next-generation sequencing test panel for ARVC using HaloPlex. We used SureDesign to prepare a HaloPlex enrichment system for sequencing of DES, DSC2, DSG2, DSP, JUP, PKP2, RYR2, TGFB3, TMEM43, and TIN from patients with ARVC using a MiSeq instrument. Performance characteristics were determined by comparison with Sanger, as the gold standard, and TruSeq Custom Amplicon sequencing of DSC2, DSG2, DSP, JUP, and PKP2. All the samples were successfully sequenced after HaloPlex capture, with greater than99% of targeted nucleotides covered by greater than20x. The sequences were of high quality, although one problematic area due to a presumptive context-specific sequencing error causing motif Located in exon 1 of the DSP gene was detected. The mutations found by Sanger sequencing were also found using the HaloPlex technique. Depending on the bioinformatics pipeline, sensitivity varied from 99.3% to 100%, and specificity varied from 99.90/0 to 100%. Three variant positions found by Sanger and HaloPlex sequencing were missed by TruSeq Custom Amplicon owing to Loss of coverage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
National Category
Basic Medicine Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113731 (URN)10.1016/j.jmoldx.2014.09.006 (DOI)000347143100006 ()25445213 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-30 Created: 2015-01-29 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Magnusson, K., Appelqvist, H., Cieslar-Pobuda, A., Wigenius, J., Karlsson, T., Los, M. J., . . . Nilsson, P. (2015). Differential vital staining of normal fibroblasts and melanoma cells by an anionic conjugated polyelectrolyte. Cytometry Part A, 87(3), 262-272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Differential vital staining of normal fibroblasts and melanoma cells by an anionic conjugated polyelectrolyte
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2015 (English)In: Cytometry Part A, ISSN 1552-4922, E-ISSN 1552-4930, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 262-272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Molecular probes for imaging of live cells are of great interest for studying biological and pathological processes. The anionic luminescent conjugated polythiophene (LCP) polythiophene acetic acid (PTAA), has previously been used for vital staining of cultured fibroblasts as well as transformed cells with results indicating differential staining due to cell phenotype. Herein, we investigated the behavior of PTAA in two normal and five transformed cells lines. PTAA fluorescence in normal cells appeared in a peripheral punctated pattern whereas the probe was more concentrated in a one-sided perinuclear localization in the five transformed cell lines. In fibroblasts, PTAA fluorescence was initially associated with fibronectin and after 24 h partially localized to lysosomes. The uptake and intracellular target in malignant melanoma cells was more ambiguous and the intracellular target of PTAA in melanoma cells is still elusive. PTAA was well tolerated by both fibroblasts and melanoma cells, and microscopic analysis as well as viability assays showed no signs of negative influence on growth. Stained cells maintained their proliferation rate for at least 12 generations. Although the probe itself was nontoxic, photoinduced cellular toxicity was observed in both cell lines upon irradiation directly after staining. However, no cytotoxicity was detected when the cells were irradiated 24 h after staining, indicating that the photoinduced toxicity is dependent on the cellular location of the probe. Overall, these studies certified PTAA as a useful agent for vital staining of cells, and that PTAA can potentially be used to study cancer-related biological and pathological processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley: 12 months, 2015
Keywords
Conjugated polyelectrolyte; Fibroblast; Fluorescence; Luminescent conjugated polythiophene; Melanoma; Photoinduced toxicity
National Category
Structural Biology Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115887 (URN)10.1002/cyto.a.22627 (DOI)000349984200009 ()25605326 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84923259526 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2018-09-14
Myhrinder, A. L., Hellqvist, E., Jansson, M., Nilsson, K., Hultman, P., Jonasson, J., . . . Rosén, A. (2013). Molecular characterization of neoplastic and normal "sister" lymphoblastoid B-cell lines from chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Leukemia and Lymphoma, 54(8), 1769-1779
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Molecular characterization of neoplastic and normal "sister" lymphoblastoid B-cell lines from chronic lymphocytic leukemia
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2013 (English)In: Leukemia and Lymphoma, ISSN 1042-8194, E-ISSN 1029-2403, Vol. 54, no 8, p. 1769-1779Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cells resemble self-renewing CD5 + B-cells carrying auto/xeno-antigen-reactive B-cell receptors (BCRs) and multiple innate pattern-recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors and scavenger receptors. Integration of signals from BCRs with multiple surface membrane receptors determines whether the cells will be proliferating, anergic or apoptotic. To better understand the role of antigen in leukemogenesis, CLL cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) will facilitate structural analysis of antigens and supply DNA for genetic studies. We present here a comprehensive genotypic and phenotypic characterization of available CLL and normal B-cell-derived lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from the same individuals (n = 17). Authenticity and verification studies of CLL-patient origin were done by IGHV sequencing, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and DNA/short tandem repeat (STR) fingerprinting. Innate B-cell features, i.e. natural Ab production and CD5 receptors, were present in most CLL cell lines, but in none of the normal LCLs. This panel of immortalized CLL-derived cell lines is a valuable reference representing a renewable source of authentic Abs and DNA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2013
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16340 (URN)10.3109/10428194.2013.764418 (DOI)000321763800032 ()
Available from: 2009-01-16 Created: 2009-01-16 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Kissopoulou, A., Jonasson, J., Lindahl, T. & Osman, A. (2013). Next Generation Sequencing Analysis of Human Platelet PolyA plus mRNAs and rRNA-Depleted Total RNA. PLoS ONE, 8(12), 81809
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Next Generation Sequencing Analysis of Human Platelet PolyA plus mRNAs and rRNA-Depleted Total RNA
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 81809-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Platelets are small anucleate cells circulating in the blood vessels where they play a key role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Here, we compared platelet RNA-Seq results obtained from polyA+ mRNA and rRNA-depleted total RNA. Materials and Methods: We used purified, CD45 depleted, human blood platelets collected by apheresis from three male and one female healthy blood donors. The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was employed to sequence cDNA converted either from oligo(dT) isolated polyA+ RNA or from rRNA-depleted total RNA. The reads were aligned to the GRCh37 reference assembly with the TopHat/Cufflinks alignment package using Ensembl annotations. A de novo assembly of the platelet transcriptome using the Trinity software package and RSEM was also performed. The bioinformatic tools HTSeq and DESeq from Bioconductor were employed for further statistical analyses of read counts. Results: Consistent with previous findings our data suggests that mitochondrially expressed genes comprise a substantial fraction of the platelet transcriptome. We also identified high transcript levels for protein coding genes related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling, cell adhesion, aggregation, as well as receptor interaction between cells. Certain transcripts were particularly abundant in platelets compared with other cell and tissue types represented by RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map 2.0 project. Irrespective of the different library preparation and sequencing protocols, there was good agreement between samples from the 4 individuals. Eighteen differentially expressed genes were identified in the two sexes at 10% false discovery rate using DESeq. Conclusion: The present data suggests that platelets may have a unique transcriptome profile characterized by a relative over-expression of mitochondrially encoded genes and also of genomic transcripts related to the cytoskeleton function, chemokine signaling and surface components compared with other cell and tissue types. The in vivo functional significance of the non-mitochondrial transcripts remains to be shown.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2013
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103875 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0081809 (DOI)000328730300052 ()
Available from: 2014-01-31 Created: 2014-01-30 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Hulten, M. A., Jonasson, J., Iwarsson, E., Uppal, P., Vorsanova, S. G., Yurov, Y. B. & Iourov, I. Y. (2013). Trisomy 21 Mosaicism: We May All Have a Touch of Down Syndrome. Cytogenetic and Genome Research, 139(3), 189-192
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trisomy 21 Mosaicism: We May All Have a Touch of Down Syndrome
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2013 (English)In: Cytogenetic and Genome Research, ISSN 1424-8581, E-ISSN 1424-859X, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 189-192Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ever increasing sophistication in the application of new analytical technology has revealed that our genomes are much more fluid than was contemplated only a few years ago. More specifically, this concerns interindividual variation in copy number (CNV) of structural chromosome aberrations, i.e. microdeletions and microduplications. It is important to recognize that in this context, we still lack basic knowledge on the impact of the CNV in normal cells from individual tissues, including that of whole chromosomes (aneuploidy). Here, we highlight this challenge by the example of the very first chromosome aberration identified in the human genome, i.e. an extra chromosome 21 (trisomy 21, T21), which is causative of Down syndrome (DS). We consider it likely that most, if not all, of us are T21 mosaics, i.e. everyone carries some cells with an extra chromosome 21, in some tissues. In other words, we may all have a touch of DS. We further propose that the occurrence of such tissue-specific T21 mosaicism may have important ramifications for the understanding of the pathogenesis, prognosis and treatment of medical problems shared between people with DS and those in the general non-DS population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Karger, 2013
Keywords
Chromosome aberration, Down syndrome, Fetus, Gonad, Mosaicism, Trisomy 21
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93871 (URN)10.1159/000346028 (DOI)000318475100007 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Wellcome Trust|061202/ZOOZ|BBSRC|BB/C003500/1|Swedish Research Council||Stockholm County Council||Deutsches Luft- und Raumfahrtszentrum/Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung|RUS 09/006RUS 11/002|

Available from: 2013-06-11 Created: 2013-06-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Samuelsson, A., Isaksson, B., Chabok, A., Jonasson, J., Nilsson, L. E., Eriksson, O. & Hanberger, H. (2012). Changes in the aerobic faecal flora of patients treated with antibiotics for acute intra-abdominal infection. Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, 44(11), 820-827
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in the aerobic faecal flora of patients treated with antibiotics for acute intra-abdominal infection
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2012 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0036-5548, E-ISSN 1651-1980, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 820-827Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: An open observational study was performed to investigate changes in the rectal flora and antibiotic susceptibility among faecal bacteria in patients treated with antibiotics for acute intra-abdominal infection. Methods: One hundred and forty patients with acute intra-abdominal infection requiring antibiotic treatment and hospitalization were included. Eight surgical units from the southern part of Sweden participated, between January 2006 and November 2007. Antibiotic treatments were according to local guidelines. Rectal swabs were obtained on admission (sample 1) and 2-14 days after the end of antibiotic treatment (sample 2). Aerobic bacteria and yeasts were analysed. The material was divided into 2 groups: 1 group with Enterobacteriaceae and 1 group with non-fermentative Gram-negative bacteria. The susceptibility to antibiotics in each group was compared between samples 1 and 2. Results: The main finding of this study on patients with severe intra-abdominal infections was a shift in the aerobic faecal flora following antibiotic treatment, from Escherichia coli to other more resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Enterococcus faecium, and yeasts. The susceptibility to cephalosporins and piperacillin-tazobactam decreased in Enterobacteriaceae. Conclusions: Following antibiotic treatment, a shift in the aerobic rectal flora to species with intrinsic antibiotic resistance was observed. This indicates that the emergence of resistance is not due to new mutations, but rather to selection of more resistant species. This should be taken into account when designing treatments for secondary intra-abdominal infections.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2012
Keywords
Antibiotic resistance; faecal flora; intra-abdominal infection
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86555 (URN)10.3109/00365548.2012.695455 (DOI)000310008900003 ()
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Hulten, M. A., Jonasson, J., Westgren, M., Jonsson, A. M., Papadogiannakis, N. & Iwarsson, E. (2012). Letter: Comment on "Origin of trisomy: no evidence to support the ovarian mosaicism theory" [Letter to the editor]. Prenatal Diagnosis, 32(12), 1221-1221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Letter: Comment on "Origin of trisomy: no evidence to support the ovarian mosaicism theory"
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2012 (English)In: Prenatal Diagnosis, ISSN 0197-3851, E-ISSN 1097-0223, Vol. 32, no 12, p. 1221-1221Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86629 (URN)10.1002/pd.3958 (DOI)000311417600019 ()
Available from: 2012-12-20 Created: 2012-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Rehnberg, M., Jonasson, J. & Gunnarsson, C. (2011). Letter: Novel L1CAM Splice Site Mutation in a Young Male With L1 Syndrome [Letter to the editor]. American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, 155A(2), 439-441
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Letter: Novel L1CAM Splice Site Mutation in a Young Male With L1 Syndrome
2011 (English)In: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A, ISSN 1552-4825, E-ISSN 1552-4833, Vol. 155A, no 2, p. 439-441Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley andamp; Sons, Ltd, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66152 (URN)10.1002/ajmg.a.33803 (DOI)000287153700031 ()
Available from: 2011-03-04 Created: 2011-03-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Hultén, M. A., Jonasson, J., Nordgren, A. & Iwarsson, E. (2010). Germinal and Somatic Trisomy 21 Mosaicism: How Common is it, What are the Implications for Individual Carriers and How Does it Come About?. CURRENT GENOMICS, 11(6), 409-419
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Germinal and Somatic Trisomy 21 Mosaicism: How Common is it, What are the Implications for Individual Carriers and How Does it Come About?
2010 (English)In: CURRENT GENOMICS, ISSN 1389-2029, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 409-419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well known that varying degrees of mosaicism for Trisomy 21, primarily a combination of normal and Trisomy 21 cells within individual tissues, may exist in the human population. This involves both Trisomy 21 mosaicism occurring in the germ line and Trisomy 21 mosaicism documented in different somatic tissues, or indeed a combination of both in the same subjects. Information on the incidence of Trisomy 21 mosaicism in different tissue samples from people with clinical features of Down syndrome as well as in the general population is, however, still limited. One of the main reasons for this lack of detailed knowledge is the technological problem of its identification, where in particular low grade/cryptic Trisomy 21 mosaicism, i.e. occurring in less than 3-5% of the respective tissues, can only be ascertained by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) methods on large cell populations from the different tissue samples. In this review we summarize current knowledge in this field with special reference to the question on the likely incidence of germinal and somatic Trisomy 21 mosaicism in the general population and its mechanisms of origin. We also highlight the reproductive and clinical implications of this type of aneuploidy mosaicism for individual carriers. We conclude that the risk of begetting a child with Trisomy 21 Down syndrome most likely is related to the incidence of Trisomy 21 cells in the germ line of any carrier parent. The clinical implications for individual carriers may likewise be dependent on the incidence of Trisomy 21 in the relevant somatic tissues. Remarkably, for example, there are indications that Trisomy 21 mosaicism will predispose carriers to conditions such as childhood leukemia and Alzheimers Disease but there is on the other hand a possibility that the risk of solid cancers may be substantially reduced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bentham Science Publishers Ltd, 2010
Keywords
Trisomy 21, mosaicism, germ line, fetus, childhood leukemia, cancer, Alzheimers Disease
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-59495 (URN)10.2174/138920210793176056 (DOI)000281436800006 ()
Available from: 2010-09-17 Created: 2010-09-17 Last updated: 2014-09-17
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