liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Svensson, Lennart
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 83) Show all publications
Nordgren, J., Sharma, S., Kambhampati, A., Lopman, B. & Svensson, L. (2016). Innate Resistance and Susceptibility to Norovirus Infection. PLoS Pathogens, 12(4), e1005385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innate Resistance and Susceptibility to Norovirus Infection
Show others...
2016 (English)In: PLoS Pathogens, ISSN 1553-7366, E-ISSN 1553-7374, Vol. 12, no 4, p. e1005385-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2016
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130446 (URN)10.1371/journal.ppat.1005385 (DOI)000378156900003 ()27115484 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research

Available from: 2016-08-06 Created: 2016-08-05 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Hagbom, M., Nordgren, J., Nybom, R., Hedlund, K.-O., Wigzell, H. & Svensson, L. (2015). Ionizing air affects influenza virus infectivity and prevents airborne-transmission. Scientific Reports, 5(11431)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ionizing air affects influenza virus infectivity and prevents airborne-transmission
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 5, no 11431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

By the use of a modified ionizer device we describe effective prevention of airborne transmitted influenza A (strain Panama 99) virus infection between animals and inactivation of virus (greater than 97%). Active ionizer prevented 100% (4/4) of guinea pigs from infection. Moreover, the device effectively captured airborne transmitted calicivirus, rotavirus and influenza virus, with recovery rates up to 21% after 40 min in a 19 m(3) room. The ionizer generates negative ions, rendering airborne particles/aerosol droplets negatively charged and electrostatically attracts them to a positively charged collector plate. Trapped viruses are then identified by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR. The device enables unique possibilities for rapid and simple removal of virus from air and offers possibilities to simultaneously identify and prevent airborne transmission of viruses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group: Open Access Journals - Option C / Nature Publishing Group, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120165 (URN)10.1038/srep11431 (DOI)000356662300002 ()26101102 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [320301]

Available from: 2015-07-13 Created: 2015-07-13 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Nordgren, J., Sharma, S., Bucardo, F., Nasir, W., Gunaydin, G., Ouermi, D., . . . Svensson, L. (2014). Both Lewis and Secretor Status Mediate Susceptibility to Rotavirus Infections in a Rotavirus Genotype-Dependent Manner. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 59(11), 1567-1573
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Both Lewis and Secretor Status Mediate Susceptibility to Rotavirus Infections in a Rotavirus Genotype-Dependent Manner
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Clinical Infectious Diseases, ISSN 1058-4838, E-ISSN 1537-6591, Vol. 59, no 11, p. 1567-1573Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. The live oral rotavirus (RV) vaccines have shown a reduced efficacy in Africa. Recent in vitro studies have shown binding of the RV surface protein (VP4) to histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) in an RV genotype-dependent manner, suggesting them to be putative receptors for RV. The diversity of HBGA phenotypes in different ethnic populations, combined with prevalence/absence of specific RV genotypes, led us to hypothesize whether the genetic variations in HBGAs in a population limit susceptibility to certain RV genotypes, plausibly leading to reduced vaccine efficacy. Methods. Association between HBGAs status and susceptibility to RV P genotypes was investigated in children in Burkina Faso and Nicaragua. In total, 242 children with diarrhea in Burkina Faso and Nicaragua were investigated, 93 of whom were RV positive. Results. In Burkina Faso, the P[8] RV strains (n = 27) infected only Lewis-and secretor-positive children (27/27; P less than .0001), but no Lewis-negative children. In contrast, the P[6] strains (n = 27) infected predominantly Lewis-negative children (n = 18; P less than.0001) but also Lewis-positive children, irrespective of their secretor status. The results from Nicaragua confirmed that all P[8]-infected children (n = 22) were secretor Lewis positive. Conclusions. As VP4 of genotype P[8] is a component of current RV vaccines, our finding that Lewis-negative children are resistant to P[8] strains provides a plausible explanation for the reduced vaccine efficacy in populations with a high percentage of Lewis-negative individuals, such as in Africa. Furthermore, our findings provide a plausible explanation as to why P[6] RV strains are more common in Africa.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press (OUP): Policy A1 - Oxford Open Option C, 2014
Keywords
rotavirus; histo-blood group antigen; Lewis; susceptibility; vaccine
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-113179 (URN)10.1093/cid/ciu633 (DOI)000345841900011 ()25097083 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [8266, 3485, dnr-348-2011-7420]

Available from: 2015-01-13 Created: 2015-01-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Becker-Dreps, S., Bucardo, F., Vilchez, S., Enrique Zambrana, L., Liu, L., Weber, D. J., . . . Paniagua, M. (2014). Etiology of Childhood Diarrhea After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction A Prospective, Population-based Study in Nicaragua. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 33(11), 1156-1163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Etiology of Childhood Diarrhea After Rotavirus Vaccine Introduction A Prospective, Population-based Study in Nicaragua
Show others...
2014 (English)In: The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, ISSN 0891-3668, E-ISSN 1532-0987, Vol. 33, no 11, p. 1156-1163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Nicaragua was the first developing nation to implement routine immunization with the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine (RV5). In this RV5-immunized population, understanding infectious etiologies of childhood diarrhea is necessary to direct diarrhea treatment and prevention efforts. Methods: We followed a population-based sample of children less than5 years in Leon, Nicaragua for diarrhea episodes through household visits. Information was obtained on RV5 history and sociodemographics. Stool samples collected during diarrhea episodes and among healthy children underwent laboratory analysis for viral, bacterial and parasitic enteropathogens. Detection frequency and incidence of each enteropathogen was calculated. Results: The 826 children in the cohort experienced 677 diarrhea episodes during 607.5 child-years of exposure time (1.1 episodes per child-year). At least 1 enteropathogen was detected among 61.1% of the 337 diarrheal stools collected. The most common enteropathogens among diarrheal stools were: norovirus (20.4%), sapovirus (16.6%), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (11.3%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (8.3%), Giardia lamblia (8.0%) and enterotoxigenic E. coli (7.7%), with rotavirus detected among 5.3% of diarrheal stools. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli and enterotoxigenic E. coli were frequently detected among stools from healthy children. Among children with diarrhea, norovirus was more commonly detected among younger children (less than2 years) and G. lamblia was more commonly detected among older children (2-4 years). The mean age of rotavirus detection was 34.6 months. Conclusions: In this Central American community after RV5 introduction, rotavirus was not commonly detected among children with diarrhea. Prevention and appropriate management of norovirus and sapovirus should be considered to further reduce the burden of diarrheal disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott, Williams andamp; Wilkins, 2014
Keywords
childhood; community; diarrhea; Nicaragua; Rotavirus vaccine
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112630 (URN)10.1097/INF.0000000000000427 (DOI)000344354400017 ()24879131 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Merck Investigator-Initiated Studies Program; Thrasher Research Fund; Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health [5K01TW008401-04]; NETROPICA [05-N-2010]

Available from: 2014-12-08 Created: 2014-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Gunaydin, G., Nordgren, J., Svensson, L. & Hammarstrom, L. (2014). Mutations in Toll-Like Receptor 3 Are Associated with Elevated Levels of Rotavirus-Specific IgG Antibodies in IgA-Deficient but Not IgA-Sufficient Individuals. Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, 21(3), 298-301
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mutations in Toll-Like Receptor 3 Are Associated with Elevated Levels of Rotavirus-Specific IgG Antibodies in IgA-Deficient but Not IgA-Sufficient Individuals
2014 (English)In: Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, ISSN 1556-6811, E-ISSN 1556-679X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 298-301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) triggers immune-mediated responses through toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), which is involved in innate antiviral defense. Low expression of TLR3 was recently suggested to contribute to susceptibility to rotavirus infection. Thus, we investigated the role of two TLR3 polymorphisms (rs3775291 and rs5743305), both of which resulted in reduced protein function or expression, in healthy blood donors and IgA-deficient (IgAD) individuals. These polymorphisms were associated with elevated rotavirus-specific IgG titers in IgAD individuals but not in healthy individuals. Thus, we propose that TLR3 signaling does not contribute to the rotavirus-specific antibody response in IgA-sufficient individuals, whereas it is associated with elevated antibody titers in IgAD individuals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Microbiology, 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105572 (URN)10.1128/CVI.00666-13 (DOI)000332036900005 ()
Available from: 2014-03-31 Created: 2014-03-27 Last updated: 2017-10-31
Nenonen, N. P., Hannoun, C., Svensson, L., Toren, K., Andersson, L.-M., Westin, J. & Bergstrom, T. (2014). Norovirus GII.4 Detection in Environmental Samples from Patient Rooms during Nosocomial Outbreaks. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 52(7), 2352-2358
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Norovirus GII.4 Detection in Environmental Samples from Patient Rooms during Nosocomial Outbreaks
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Microbiology, ISSN 0095-1137, E-ISSN 1098-660X, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 2352-2358Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Norovirus (NoV) is an important cause of nosocomial gastroenteric outbreaks. This 5-month study was designed to characterize NoV contamination and airborne dispersal in patient rooms during hospital outbreaks. Air vents, overbed tables, washbasins, dust, and virus traps designed to collect charged particles from the air were swabbed to investigate the possibility of NoV contamination in patient rooms during outbreaks in seven wards and in an outbreak-free ward. Symptomatic inpatients were also sampled. Nucleic acid extracts of the samples were examined for NoV RNA using genogroup I (GI) and GII real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The NoV strains were characterized by RT-PCR, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase-N/S capsid-coding region (1,040 nucleotides [nt]). Patient strains from two outbreaks in one ward were sequenced across the RNA-dependent-RNA-polymerase major capsid-coding region (2.5 kb), including the hypervariable P2 domain. In the outbreak wards, NoV GII was detected in 48 of 101 (47%) environmental swabs and 63 of 108 patients (58%); NoV genotype II.4 was sequenced from 18 environmental samples, dust (n = 8), virus traps (n = 4), surfaces (n = 6), and 56 patients. In contrast, NoV GII was detected in 2 (GII. 4) of 28 (7%) environmental samples and in 2 (GII. 6 and GII. 4) of 17 patients in the outbreak-free ward. Sequence analyses revealed a high degree of similarity (greater than99.5%, 1,040 nt) between NoV GII.4 environmental and patient strains from a given ward at a given time. The strains clustered on 11 subbranches of the phylogenetic tree, with strong correlations to time and place. The high nucleotide similarity between the NoV GII.4 strains from patients and their hospital room environment provided molecular evidence of GII.4 dispersal in the air and dust; therefore, interventional cleaning studies are justified.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Microbiology, 2014
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109598 (URN)10.1128/JCM.00266-14 (DOI)000339279700011 ()24759712 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-21 Created: 2014-08-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Mickiene, A., Pakalniene, J., Nordgren, J., Carlsson, B., Hagbom, M., Svensson, L. & Lindquist, L. (2014). Polymorphisms in Chemokine Receptor 5 and Toll-Like Receptor 3 Genes Are Risk Factors for Clinical Tick-Borne Encephalitis in the Lithuanian Population. PLoS ONE, 9(9), e106798
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Polymorphisms in Chemokine Receptor 5 and Toll-Like Receptor 3 Genes Are Risk Factors for Clinical Tick-Borne Encephalitis in the Lithuanian Population
Show others...
2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 9, p. e106798-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) infections can be asymptomatic or cause moderate to severe injuries of the nervous system. We previously reported that a nonfunctional chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) and a functional Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) predispose adults to clinical tick-borne encephalitis (TBE). This study expands our previous findings and further examines polymorphisms in CCR5 and TLR3 genes in different age and disease severity groups. Methods: 117 children and 129 adults, stratified into mild, moderate and severe forms of TBE, and 103 adults with severe TBE were analyzed. 135 healthy individuals and 79 patients with aseptic meningoencephalitis served as controls. CCR5 delta 32 and rs3775291 TLR3 genotypes were established by pyrosequencing, and their frequencies were analyzed using recessive genetic, genotype and allelic models. Findings: The prevalence of CCR5 Delta 32 homozygotes was higher in children (2.5%), in adults with severe TBE (1.9%), and in the combined cohort of TBE patients (2.3%) than in controls (0%) (pless than0.05). The nonfunctional homozygous TLR3 genotype was less prevalent among the combined TBE cohort (11.5%) than among controls (19.9%) (p = 0.025), but did not differ between children TBE and controls. The genotype and allele prevalence of CCR5 and TLR3 did not differ in children nor adult TBE cohorts stratified by disease severity. However, in the severe adult TBE cohort, homozygous functional TLR3 genotype and wt allele were less prevalent compared to the adult cohort with the whole disease severity spectrum (44.4% vs 59.8% p = 0.022 and 65.2% vs 76.4% p = 0.009; respectively). Conclusions: Independently of age, nonfunctional CCR5D32 mutation is a significant risk factor for development of clinical TBE, but not for disease severity. The polymorphism of TLR3 gene predisposes to clinical TBE in adults only and may be associated with disease severity. Further studies are needed to clarify the role of these polymorphisms in susceptibility to TBEV infection.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2014
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-112653 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0106798 (DOI)000344317700018 ()25226020 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Research Council of Lithuania [MIP-11174]; Swedish Research Council [3485]

Available from: 2014-12-05 Created: 2014-12-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Bucardo, F., Reyes, Y., Svensson, L. & Nordgren, J. (2014). Predominance of Norovirus and Sapovirus in Nicaragua after Implementation of Universal Rotavirus Vaccination. PLoS ONE, 9(5), e0098201
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predominance of Norovirus and Sapovirus in Nicaragua after Implementation of Universal Rotavirus Vaccination
2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 5, p. e0098201-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite significant reduction of rotavirus (RV) infections following implementation of RotaTeq vaccination in Nicaragua, a large burden of patients with diarrhea persists. Methods: We conducted a community-and hospital-based study of the burden of RV, norovirus (NV) and sapovirus (SV) infections as cause of sporadic acute gastroenteritis (GE) among 330 children less than= 5 years of age between September 2009 and October 2010 in two major cities of Nicaragua with a RotaTeq coverage rate of 95%. Results: We found that NV, SV and RV infections altogether accounted for 45% of cases of GE. Notably, NV was found in 24% (79/330) of the children, followed by SV (17%, 57/330) and RV (8%, 25/330). The detection rate in the hospital setting was 27%, 15% and 14% for NV, SV and RV respectively, whereas in the community setting the detection rate of RV was less than 1%. Among each of the investigated viruses one particular genogroup or genotype was dominant; GII.4 (82%) for NV, GI (46%) for SV and G1P[8] (64%) in RV. These variants were also found in higher proportions in the hospital setting compared to the community setting. The GII.4.2006 Minerva strain circulating globally since 2006 was the most common among genotyped NV in this study, with the GII.4-2010 New Orleans emerging in 2010. Conclusions: This study shows that NV has become the leading viral cause of gastroenteritis at hospital and community settings in Nicaragua after implementation of RV vaccination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-108169 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0098201 (DOI)000336730600097 ()
Available from: 2014-06-26 Created: 2014-06-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Istrate, C., Hagbom, M., Vikström, E., Magnusson, K.-E. & Svensson, L. (2014). Rotavirus Infection Increases Intestinal Motility but Not Permeability at the Onset of Diarrhea. Journal of Virology, 88(6), 3161-3169
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rotavirus Infection Increases Intestinal Motility but Not Permeability at the Onset of Diarrhea
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Journal of Virology, ISSN 0022-538X, E-ISSN 1098-5514, Vol. 88, no 6, p. 3161-3169Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The disease mechanisms associated with onset and secondary effects of rotavirus (RV) diarrhea remain to be determined and may not be identical. In this study, we investigated whether onset of RV diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal permeability and/or motility. To study the transit time, fluorescent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was given to RV-infected adult and infant mice. Intestinal motility was also studied with an opioid receptor agonist (loperamide) and a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine). To investigate whether RV increases permeability at the onset of diarrhea, fluorescent 4- and 10-kDa dextran doses were given to infected and noninfected mice, and fluorescence intensity was measured subsequently in serum. RV increased transit time in infant mice. Increased motility was detected at 24 h postinfection (h p.i.) and persisted up to 72 h p.i in pups. Both loperamide and atropine decreased intestinal motility and attenuated diarrhea. Analysis of passage of fluorescent dextran from the intestine into serum indicated unaffected intestinal permeability at the onset of diarrhea (24 to 48 h p.i.). We show that RV-induced diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal motility via an activation of the myenteric nerve plexus, which in turn stimulates muscarinic receptors on intestinal smooth muscles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Microbiology, 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105750 (URN)10.1128/JVI.02927-13 (DOI)000332126000010 ()
Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Nordgren, J., Nitiema, L. W., Ouermi, D., Simpore, J. & Svensson, L. (2013). Host Genetic Factors Affect Susceptibility to Norovirus Infections in Burkina Faso. PLoS ONE, 8(7), e69557
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Host Genetic Factors Affect Susceptibility to Norovirus Infections in Burkina Faso
Show others...
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 7, p. e69557-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Norovirus (NoV) constitutes the second most common viral pathogen causing pediatric diarrhea after rotavirus. In Africa, diarrhea is a major health problem in children, and yet few studies have been performed regarding NoV. The association of histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) and susceptibility to NoV infection is well established in Caucasian populations with non-secretors being resistant to many common NoV strains. No study regarding HBGA and NoV susceptibility has yet been performed in Africa. We collected 309 stool and 208 saliva samples from diarrheal children in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; May 2009 to March 2010. NoV was detected using real-time PCR, and genotyped by sequencing. Saliva samples were ABO, Lewis and secretor phenotyped using in house ELISA assays. NoV was detected in 12% (n = 37) of the samples. The genotype diversity was unusually large; overall the 37 positive samples belonged to 14 genotypes. Only children <2 years of age were NoV positive and the GII.4 NoVs were more frequent in the late dry season (Jan-May). NoV infections were observed less in children with the secretor-negative phenotype or blood group A (OR 0.18; p = 0.012 and OR 0.31; p = 0.054; respectively), with two non-secretors infected with genotypes GII.7 and GII.4 respectively. Lewis-negative (Lea−b−) children, representing 32% of the study population, were susceptible to GII, but were not infected with any NoV GI. GII.4 strains preferentially infected children with blood group B whereas secretor-positive children with blood group O were infected with the largest variety of genotypes. This is the first study identifying host genetic factors associated with susceptibility to NoV in an African population, and suggests that while the non-secretor phenotype provides protection; the Lewis b antigen is not necessary for GII infection.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-96016 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0069557 (DOI)000322391400062 ()23894502 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2013-08-13 Created: 2013-08-13 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications