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Samuelsson, Kersti
Publications (10 of 37) Show all publications
Möller, S., Hagberg, K., Samuelsson, K. & Ramstrand, N. (2018). Perceived self-efficacy and specific self-reported outcomes in persons withlower-limb amputation using a non-microprocessor-controlled versus amicroprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee. Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 13(3), 220-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived self-efficacy and specific self-reported outcomes in persons withlower-limb amputation using a non-microprocessor-controlled versus amicroprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee
2018 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 220-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To measure self-efficacy in a group of individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputationand investigate the relationship between self-efficacy and prosthetic-specific outcomes including prostheticuse, mobility, amputation-related problems and global health. A second purpose was to examine ifdifferences exist in outcomes based upon the type of prosthetic knee unit being used.Method: Cross-sectional study using the General Self-Efficacy (GSE) Scale and the Questionnaire forPersons with a Transfemoral Amputation (Q-TFA). Forty-two individuals participated in the study. Twentythreeused a non-microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (non-MPK) and 19 used a microprocessor-controlled prosthetic knee joint (MPK).Results: The study sample had quite high GSE scores (32/40). GSE scores were significantly correlated tothe Q-TFA prosthetic use, mobility and problem scores. High GSE scores were related to higher levels ofprosthetic use, mobility, global scores and negatively related to problem score. No significant differencewas observed between individuals using a non-MPK versus MPK joints.Conclusions: Individuals with high self-efficacy used their prosthesis to a higher degree and high self-efficacywas related to higher level of mobility, global scores and fewer problems related to the amputationin individuals who have undergone a lower-limb amputation and were using a non-MPK or MPK knee.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Self-efficacy; amputation; prosthetic limb; prosthetic knee; trans-femoral amputation
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145703 (URN)10.1080/17483107.2017.1306590 (DOI)28366038 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-16
Lilliecreutz, E. K., Felixson, B., Lundqvist, A. & Samuelsson, K. (2017). Effects of guided aerobic exercise and mindfulness after acquired brain injury: a pilot study. European Journal of Physiotherapy, 19(4), 229-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of guided aerobic exercise and mindfulness after acquired brain injury: a pilot study
2017 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 229-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine whether a specific guided programme of aerobic exercise together with mindfulness could have an effect on estimated health status and occupational performance in individuals with acquired brain injury (ABI). As secondary outcomes, the effects on health-related quality of life, cognition and mental fatigue were analysed.

Methods: The study included individuals with mild to moderate ABI (n = 21) with residual cognitive impairments. Guided interventions were given three times per week for 12 weeks. Neuropsychological and physical tests as well as patient-reported outcome measures were used as outcomes.

Results: Estimated health status, self-reported occupational performance as well as satisfaction with performance improved together with physical capacity. Improvements in cognitive functions were related to attention and information processing speed; in addition, self-reported mental fatigue was reduced after the intervention. Cognitive function related to working memory and health-related quality of life were not affected.

Conclusions: Support to improve physical capacity combined with practicing mindfulness, bringing attention to the present moment, seems to have a positive impact on occupational performance, estimated health status, attention and information processing speed as well as mental fatigue in individuals with cognitive dysfunction after ABI.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2017
Keywords
Rehabilitation; adults; activities of daily life; physical capacity; cognition
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-145705 (URN)10.1080/21679169.2017.1337220 (DOI)2-s2.0-85020718352 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-05-04Bibliographically approved
Hellgren, L., Samuelsson, K., Lundqvist, A. & Börsbo, B. (2015). Computerized Training of Working Memoryfor Patients with Acquired Brain Injury. Open Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, 3, 46-55
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computerized Training of Working Memoryfor Patients with Acquired Brain Injury
2015 (English)In: Open Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation, ISSN 2332-1822, Vol. 3, p. 46-55Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Patients with acquired brain injury often experience impaired working memory(WM), a condition that can make everyday life activities and work difficult. Objectives: This studyinvestigates the effects of computerized WM training on WM skills, cognitive tests, activity performanceand estimated health and whether the effects of computerized WM training can be attributedto sex or time since injury. Methods: Forty-eight patients with acquired brain injury underwentcomputerized WM training. Patients were tested by a neuropsychologist and interviewedby an occupational therapist just prior and 20 weeks after completion of training. Results: Patientswho participated in computerized WM training significantly improved their WM skills shown inWM index, their neuropsychological test scores, and their self-estimated health scores. They alsosignificantly improved their performance of individually defined WM-related everyday activitiesand their satisfaction with the performance of these activities. There was a significant differencein terms of WM index, WM-related daily activity performance, and satisfaction with respect to timesince injury. Conclusion: Computerized WM training can improve cognitive and everyday performancefor patients with acquired brain injury. Patients can improve their cognitive functions along time after suffering a brain injury or disease. This effect is greater if WM training is used earlyin the rehabilitation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Scientific Research Publishing, 2015
Keywords
Working Memory, Brain Injury, Rehabilitation, Adults
National Category
Physiotherapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125367 (URN)10.4236/ojtr.2015.32007 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-21 Created: 2016-02-21 Last updated: 2019-01-11
Hesselstrand, M., Samuelsson, K. & Liedberg, G. (2015). Occupational Therapy Interventions in Chronic Pain - A Systematic Review. Occupational Therapy International, 22(4), 183-194
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational Therapy Interventions in Chronic Pain - A Systematic Review
2015 (English)In: Occupational Therapy International, ISSN 0966-7903, E-ISSN 1557-0703, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 183-194Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of interventions based on the best available evidence in occupational therapy is essential, and evaluation of research is part of an evidence-based practice. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of studies describing and evaluating the effects of occupational therapy interventions on chronic pain. A systematic review of studies with diverse designs was carried out. A quality assessment was conducted, and the level of evidence was defined using the Research Pyramid Model. Of 19 included studies, three received the highest evidence level, and three were considered to be of high quality. The clinical recommendations that can be derived from this study are the following: occupational therapy interventions should start from the identified needs of the person with chronic pain; no support exists for the effectiveness of electromyographic biofeedback training as a supplement, more studies are needed to confirm this result; the efficacy of instructions on body mechanics was significant during work-hardening treatment; and occupational therapists need to perform and present more clinical studies of high quality and high-evidence level to build up a trustworthy arsenal of evidence-based interventions, for example, in persons with chronic pain. Copyright (C) 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2015
Keywords
evidence-based practice; outcome; quality assessment; rehabilitation
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124505 (URN)10.1002/oti.1396 (DOI)000367827300003 ()26076994 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Gunnarsson, S. & Samuelsson, K. (2015). Patient experiences with intrathecal baclofen as a treatment for spatsticity - a pilot study. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(10), 834-841
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patient experiences with intrathecal baclofen as a treatment for spatsticity - a pilot study
2015 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 834-841Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: This study describes how patients experience intrathecal baclofen (ITB) treatment. Methods: Data were collected from interviews with 14 patients (19–76 years old) who were diagnosed with spinal cord injury (SCI), multiple sclerosis (MS), or cerebral palsy (CP). Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Result: The analysis resulted in 16 subcategories arranged into five main categories: procedures before treatment, the effect of ITB on daily life and activities, continuous follow-up, expected and unexpected consequences of ITB, and overall level of satisfaction with ITB. Together these categories described the patients' experiences with ITB treatment. When the patients were asked whether they would undergo ITB again, they all stated that they would. Conclusion: Patients stated that they were highly satisfied with the ITB treatment. However, the patients identified several areas that could be improved. Specifically, the patients wanted more information about the different steps in the treatment process and what to expect from ITB treatment.Implications for Rehabilitation

  • An overall satisfaction with the effect from ITB treatment was shown, but some areas still need to be improved.

  • Complications following ITB treatment still remain a major concern for the patient group.

  • Future clinical practice, should address how to take into account patients' expectations and define relevant goals with respect to ITB treatment as well as how to supply professional information.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
National Category
Other Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115760 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2014.943844 (DOI)000352702500002 ()25052099 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-18 Created: 2015-03-18 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Tropp, M., Lundqvist, A., Persson, C., Samuelsson, K. & Levander, S. (2015). Self-ratings of everyday memory problems in patients with aquired brain injury - a tool for rehabilitation. International Journal of Physical Medicine Rehabilitation, 3(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-ratings of everyday memory problems in patients with aquired brain injury - a tool for rehabilitation
Show others...
2015 (English)In: International Journal of Physical Medicine Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 2329-9096, Vol. 3, no 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Memory problems are common in everyday life of patients with acquired brain injury (ABI). Some patients with ABI also have problems with self-monitoring/awareness. The ecological validity of neuropsychological tests for everyday life memory problems is questionable. Can self-report instruments supply complementary information? Aims: 1) To document the frequency/impact of self-reported memory problems in a sample of consecutive referrals of ABI patients using PEEM and REEM. 2) To characterize the instruments with respect to psychometrics and internal consistency. 3) To document differences in memory problem patterns for various kinds/localization of brain lesions, and associated anxiety/ depression symptoms. Methods: A descriptive retrospective study of consecutive referrals of ABI patients was performed. Ratings from the Evaluation of Everyday Memory (EEM), in a patient version (PEEM) and a version for relatives/proxies (REEM) were analysed as well as self-ratings of anxiety and depression. Results: The EEM instruments displayed good psychometric characteristics. The mean PEEM score were close to the tenth percentile of healthy controls. PEEM and REEM versions were strongly inter-correlated. Sex, age, and lesion characteristics did not matter much with one exception. Right-hemisphere lesion patients rated their memory problems significantly lower than the proxy, for all other lesions it was vice versa. Anxiety and depression symptoms were associated with memory problems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Omics publishing group, 2015
Keywords
Anosognosia; Anxiety; Brain injury; Clinical relevance;
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125364 (URN)10.4172/2329-9096.1000258 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-02-21 Created: 2016-02-21 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Wressle, E. & Samuelsson, K. (2015). The self-reported use of research in clinical practice: A survey of occupational therapists in Sweden. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 22(3), 226-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The self-reported use of research in clinical practice: A survey of occupational therapists in Sweden
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 226-234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Today, healthcare providers and occupational therapists are increasingly required to rely on evidence-based practices. In both out-patient and in-patient settings, the use of research-based practices can be identified using the questionnaire Research Utilization Measure. Aim: This study explores how occupational therapists in Sweden perceive research utilization. Method: The Research Utilization measure was sent to 807 randomly selected occupational therapists in Sweden, and the response rate was 59% (n=472). Results: The majority of respondents (56%, n=256) reported use of research-based knowledge in their practice “very or rather often”, although 49% (n=225) of these therapists noted that they “very seldom or never” discussed research findings with their managers. Differences in answers for most items were related to degree of education and length of experience. Occupational therapists with higher education levels more often reported use of research in their clinical practice and therapists with greater experience less often reported use of research in their clinical practice. Conclusion: Education seems to influence the degree to which occupational therapists rely on research to inform their practices. A future challenge for managers and occupational therapists is to create strategic discussions on how to implement treatment that is based on current research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
clinical practice, evidence-based practice, implementation
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115884 (URN)10.3109/11038128.2014.992951 (DOI)000351399500008 ()25539151 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Samuelsson, K. & Wressle, E. (2015). Turning evidence into practice: Barriers to research use among occupational therapists. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 78(3), 175-181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Turning evidence into practice: Barriers to research use among occupational therapists
2015 (English)In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 175-181Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Research has demonstrated that occupational therapists generally have a positive attitude regarding the use of evidence in their daily practice and decision-making. In addition, occupational therapists are expected to implement evidencebased practice, which is often understood as equivalent to research. However, evidence-based practice might be difficult to reconcile with occupational therapy from a client-centred focus. This study examines what occupational therapists perceive as barriers to research use and discusses the challenge of clinical implementation.

Method: This study uses a descriptive cross-sectional design. The Barriers to Research Utilization Scale questionnaire was mailed to 807 randomly selected Swedish occupational therapists. The response rate was 59%.

Findings: The occupational therapists identified three main barriers to the use of research: insufficient facilities (82%); lack of time to read research (77%); difficulty understanding statistical analyses (75%). Degree of education was shown to affect results; occupational therapists with higher education levels indicated a higher use of research.

Conclusion: Implementing research in clinical practice is a challenge. Occupational therapists are interested but they lack the optimal prerequisites and time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
clinical practice, support, survey
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115885 (URN)10.1177/0308022615569511 (DOI)000353581700005 ()
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Wressle, E. & Samuelsson, K. (2014). High job demands and lack of time: A future challenge in occupational therapy. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 21(6), 421-428
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High job demands and lack of time: A future challenge in occupational therapy
2014 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 421-428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to identify work-related stress factors that contributed to work-related stress among Swedish occupational therapists and to investigate the association between work-related stress, demographic factors and perceived overall stress. Methods: A postal questionnaire and a letter of invitation were sent to 807 Swedish occupational therapists, selected at random and representing 10% of occupational therapists working in Sweden. The response rate was 59%. A stress index presenting 49 stress factors graded on a scale from 1 (indicating no source of stress) to 6 (definitely a source of stress) was included. In addition, the level of perceived overall stress during the last 2 weeks was scored on a rating scale with the end points 0 (no stress) and 10 (extreme stress). Results: The main findings indicated that lack of resources and lack of time were the main stressors. “Working at a superficial level due to lack of time” was the only variable associated with high overall stress when both work-related and personal factors were included. Professional identity and clarity about the role were graded low with regard to stress. Conclusions: Work-related stress is just one aspect of the overall stress experienced but knowledge about its consequences highlights the importance of further studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
work-related stress, professional identity, postal questionnaire
National Category
Occupational Therapy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111713 (URN)10.3109/11038128.2014.941929 (DOI)000344362000003 ()25100242 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-10-29 Created: 2014-10-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Lilliecreutz Huitema, E., Samuelsson, K. & Andersson, G. (2014). Lifestyle changes with help from Health Profile Assessment in combination with support in individual interventions for persons with aquired brain injury - a pilot study. European Journal of Physiotherapy, 16(3), 151-158
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifestyle changes with help from Health Profile Assessment in combination with support in individual interventions for persons with aquired brain injury - a pilot study
2014 (English)In: European Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 2167-9169, E-ISSN 2167-9177, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 151-158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about how to support a lifestyle change for persons with acquired brain injury (ABI), who have poor health compared with the rest of the population. This study investigates whether the Health Profile Assessment (HPA) combined with individual support in individually adjusted interventions could affect the lifestyle of persons with ABI. This longitudinal prospective and quasi-experimental study has a before and after design. HPA aims to improve health habits, perceived health and physiological measurements. In addition, this study includes interventions based on individual goals and actions decided on by the participants. The intervention process was supported through various communication methods such as Motivational Interviewing (MI) and Transactional Analyses (TA). The studied group (n = 25) included persons with cognitive impairments due to ABI who were considered for outpatient rehabilitation at a specialized facility at a university hospital in south-eastern Sweden. Results at follow-up showed significant improvements in physical activity, perceived health and diet. Significant improvements were also shown in sagittal abdominal diameter, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI) and physical fitness. Consequently, this study describes a method that successfully supported lifestyle changes in persons with ABI.Read

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2014
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115757 (URN)10.3109/21679169.2014.899391 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-03-18 Created: 2015-03-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
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