liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Holmgren Peterson, Kajsa
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Sjöberg, V., Hollén, E., Pietz, G., Magnusson, K.-E., Fälth-Magnusson, K., Sundström, M., . . . Hammarström, M.-L. (2014). Noncontaminated dietary oats may hamper normalization of the intestinal immune status in childhood celiac disease.. Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, 5(e58)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Noncontaminated dietary oats may hamper normalization of the intestinal immune status in childhood celiac disease.
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology, ISSN 2155-384X, E-ISSN 2155-384X, Vol. 5, no e58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Life-long, strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only treatment for celiac disease (CD). Because there is still uncertainty regarding the safety of oats for CD patients, the aim was to investigate whether dietary oats influence the immune status of their intestinal mucosa.

METHODS: Paired small intestinal biopsies, before and after >11 months on a GFD, were collected from children with CD who were enrolled in a randomized, double-blind intervention trial to either of two diets: standard GFD (GFD-std; n=13) and noncontaminated oat-containing GFD (GFD-oats; n=15). Expression levels of mRNAs for 22 different immune effector molecules and tight junction proteins were determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR.

RESULTS: The number of mRNAs that remained elevated was higher in the GFD-oats group (P=0.05). In particular, mRNAs for the regulatory T cell (Treg) signature molecules interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), the cytotoxicity-activating natural killer (NK) receptors KLRC2/NKG2C and KLRC3/NKG2E, and the tight junction protein claudin-4 remained elevated. Between the two groups, most significant differences were seen for claudin-4 (P=0.003) and KLRC3/NKG2E (P=0.04).

CONCLUSIONS: A substantial fraction of pediatric CD patients seem to not tolerate oats. In these patients, dietary oats influence the immune status of the intestinal mucosa with an mRNA profile suggesting presence of activated cytotoxic lymphocytes and Tregs and a stressed epithelium with affected tight junctions. Assessment of changes in levels of mRNA for claudin-4 and KLC3/NKG2E from onset to after a year on oats containing GFD shows promise to identify these CD patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2014
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-115888 (URN)10.1038/ctg.2014.9 (DOI)000355530800002 ()24964993 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84903278030 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-23 Created: 2015-03-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Sjö, A., Magnusson, K.-E. & Holmgren Peterson, K. (2010). Protein kinase C activation has distinct effects on the localization, phosphorylation and detergent solubility of the claudin protein family in tight and leaky epithelial cells. Journal of Membrane Biology, 236(2), 181-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Protein kinase C activation has distinct effects on the localization, phosphorylation and detergent solubility of the claudin protein family in tight and leaky epithelial cells
2010 (English)In: Journal of Membrane Biology, ISSN 0022-2631, E-ISSN 1432-1424, Vol. 236, no 2, p. 181-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We have previously shown that protein kinase C (PKC) activation has distinct effects on the structure and barrier properties of cultured epithelial cells (HT29 and MDCK I). Since the claudin family of tight junction (TJ)-associated proteins is considered to be crucial for the function of mature TJ, we assessed their expression patterns and cellular destination, detergent solubility and phosphorylation upon PKC stimulation for 2 or 18 h with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). In HT29 cells, claudins 1, 3, 4 and 5 and possibly claudin 2 were redistributed to apical cell-cell contacts after PKC activation and the amounts of claudins 1, 3 and 5, but not of claudin 2, were increased in cell lysates. By contrast, in MDCK I cells, PMA treatment resulted in redistribution of claudins 1, 3, 4 and 5 from the TJ and in reorganization of the proteins into more insoluble complexes. Claudins 1 and 4 were phosphorylated in both MDCK I and HT29 cells, but PKC-induced changes in claudin phosphorylation state were detected only in MDCK I cells. A major difference between HT29 and MDCK I cells, which have low and high basal transepithelial electrical resistance, respectively, was the absence of claudin 2 in the latter. Our findings show that PKC activation targets in characteristic ways the expression patterns, destination, detergent solubility and phosphorylation state of claudins in epithelial cells with different capacities to form an epithelial barrier.

Keywords
Claudin, Tight junction, Protein kinase C, Detergent solubility
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-58815 (URN)10.1007/s00232-010-9289-7 (DOI)
Available from: 2010-08-27 Created: 2010-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Gréen,, A., Lönn, A., Holmgren Peterson, K., Öllinger, K. & Rundquist, I. (2010). Translocation of Histone H1 Subtypes Between Chromatin and Cytoplasm During Mitosis in Normal Human Fibroblasts. Cytometry Part A, 77A(5), 478-484
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Translocation of Histone H1 Subtypes Between Chromatin and Cytoplasm During Mitosis in Normal Human Fibroblasts
Show others...
2010 (English)In: Cytometry Part A, ISSN 1552-4922, E-ISSN 1552-4930, Vol. 77A, no 5, p. 478-484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Histone H1 is an important constituent of chromatin which undergoes major structural rearrangements during mitosis. However, the role of H1, multiple H1 subtypes and H1 phosphorylation is still unclear. In normal human fibroblasts, phosphorylated H1 was found located in nuclei during prophase and in both cytoplasm and condensed chromosomes during metaphase, anaphase and telophase as detected by immunocytochemistry. Moreover, we detected remarkable differences in the distribution of the histone H1 subtypes H1.2, H1.3 and H1.5 during mitosis. H1.2 was found in chromatin during prophase, and almost solely in the cytoplasm of metaphase and early anaphase cells. In late anaphase it appeared in both chromatin and cytoplasm, and again in chromatin during telophase. H1.5 distribution pattern resembled that of H1.2, but some H1.5 remained situated in chromatin during metaphase and early anaphase. H1.3 was detected in chromatin in all cell cycle phases. We propose therefore, that H1 subtype translocation during mitosis is controlled by phosphorylation, in combination with H1 subtype inherent affinity. We conclude that H1 subtypes, or their phosphorylated variants, may be signalling molecules in mitosis or that they leave chromatin in a regulated way to give access for chromatin condensing factors or transcriptional regulators during mitosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2010
Keywords
Histone H1, Chromatin, Cell cycle, Mitosis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16383 (URN)10.1002/cyto.a.20851 (DOI)000277174000009 ()20104577 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-01-20 Created: 2009-01-20 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Nayeri, F., Holmgren Peterson, K., Perskvist, N., Forsberg, P., Peterson, C. & Sundqvist, T. (2007). An in vitro model for assessment of the biological activity of hepatocyte growth factor. Growth Factors, 25(1), 33-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An in vitro model for assessment of the biological activity of hepatocyte growth factor
Show others...
2007 (English)In: Growth Factors, ISSN 0897-7194, E-ISSN 1029-2292, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 33-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a multifunctional growth factor with potent wound-healing properties that functions in the healing of chronic injuries. However, there may be a loss of HGF activity in certain chronic cases; this might be indicated by the presence of high amounts of HGF in body fluids and by the elevated expression of the HGF receptor in tissue biopsies. In such cases, a reliable means of assessing the activity of endogenous HGF would be valuable in allowing clinicians to decide if treatment with HGF would be useful. In this study, we developed an in vitro wound assay that used a mouse skin epithelial cell line to evaluate the biological activity of HGF. We showed that HGF accelerated the motility of the epithelial cells in a dose-dependent fashion with high sensitivity and specificity. This in vitro assay might be used to determine the activity of both endogenous and recombinant HGF.

Keywords
Activity, Body fluids, HGF, In vitro, In vivo, Recombinant
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-50004 (URN)10.1080/08977190600997200 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Immerstrand, C., Hedlund, J., Magnusson, K.-E., Sundqvist, T. & Holmgren-Peterson, K. (2007). Organelle transport in melanophores analyzed by white light image correlation spectroscopy. Journal of Microscopy, 225(3), 275-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organelle transport in melanophores analyzed by white light image correlation spectroscopy
Show others...
2007 (English)In: Journal of Microscopy, ISSN 0022-2720, E-ISSN 1365-2818, Vol. 225, no 3, p. 275-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intracellular transport of organelles, vesicles and proteins is crucial in all eukaryotic cells, and is accomplished by motor proteins that move along cytoskeletal filaments. A widely used model of intracellular transport is Xenopus laevis melanophores. These cells help the frog to change color by redistributing melanin-containing organelles in the cytoplasm. The high contrast of the pigment organelles permits changes in distribution to be observed by ordinary light microscopy; other intracellular transport systems often require fluorescence labeling. Here we have developed white light Image Correlation Spectroscopy (ICS) to monitor aggregation and dispersion of pigment. Hitherto in ICS, images of fluorescent particles from Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) have been used to calculate autocorrelation functions from which the density can be obtained. In the present study we show that ICS can be modified to enable analysis of light-microscopy images; it can be used to monitor pigment aggregation and dispersion, and distinguish between different stimuli. This new approach makes ICS applicable not only to fluorescent but also to black-and-white images from light or electron microscopy, and is thus very versatile in different studies of movement of particles on the membrane or in the cytoplasm of cells without potentially harmful fluorescence labeling and activation.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-38154 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2818.2007.01743.x (DOI)42107 (Local ID)42107 (Archive number)42107 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Wetterö, J., Pettersson, S. & Holmgren Peterson, K. (2006). A cellular imaging CDIO project for 2nd semester students in engineering biology. World Transactions on Engineering and Technology Education, 5(2), 279-282
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cellular imaging CDIO project for 2nd semester students in engineering biology
2006 (English)In: World Transactions on Engineering and Technology Education, ISSN 1446-2257, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 279-282Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The demand for exact engineering within the life sciences is growing and the Engineering Biology programme at Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden, prepares students for a career at this interface. Conceive – Design – Implement – Operate (CDIO) was recently pioneered in an introductory project course. Groups of six to seven students apply a LIPS scalable project model from traditional engineering educational environments on, for example, a cellular imaging task in a hospital setting, prior to taking courses in cell biology/optics. Besides facilitating the implementation of CDIO in higher courses, students gain early career insight and enhance their communication skills. A customer (senior teacher) needs to visualise structures in cells, and the student group is contracted to deliver an applied and optimised method to meet specified requirements. The customer reviews deliverables before the tollgates and communicates with the student project leader. Other students are responsible for documentation and subsystems. The project is allocated laboratory facilities and hardware, and two fictitious subcontractors supply samples and consumables. Extra teachers perform supervision and methodological consultation. In summary, CDIO is indeed applicable and rewarding in cellular imaging, yet is also challenging.

National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-17874 (URN)
Note
Original Publication: Jonas Wetterö, Sofia Pettersson and Kajsa Holmgren Peterson, A cellular imaging CDIO project for 2nd semester students in engineering biology, 2006, World Transactions on Engineering and Technology Education, (5), 2, 279-282. Permission granted for this online version by the original publisher Monash University Available from: 2009-04-23 Created: 2009-04-23 Last updated: 2015-06-29Bibliographically approved
Hollén, E., Holmgren Peterson, K., Sundqvist, T., Grodzinsky, E., Högberg, L., Laurin, P., . . . Magnusson, K.-E. (2006). Coeliac children on a gluten-free diet with or without oats display equal anti-avenin antibody titres. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 41(1), 42-47
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coeliac children on a gluten-free diet with or without oats display equal anti-avenin antibody titres
Show others...
2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 42-47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. Recent studies report negligible toxicity of oats in the majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients. It has previously been shown that children with untreated CD have circulating antibodies to oats avenin. In this study we performed serial assessments of anti-avenin antibodies in children under investigation for CD on a gluten-free diet with or without oats.

Material and methods. The study involved 116 children, randomized to a standard gluten-free diet or a gluten-free diet supplemented with oats. Sera were obtained from 86 children, 48 in the standard gluten-free group and 38 in the gluten-free oats group, of which 33 consumed at least 10 g of oats daily. IgA and IgG anti-avenin antibodies were monitored at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months. Nitric oxide metabolites were measured in 7 patients, with deviating antibody results.

Results. There was a significant decrease in anti-avenin antibodies in both groups at the end as compared to the beginning of the study, (p<0.001), but no difference was found between the two groups. IgA titres already declined after 3 months. IgG titres, although significantly decreased, remained high in the majority of patients in both groups. Nitric oxide levels were high in four of the analysed samples.

Conclusions. Oats per se, do not seem to produce a humoral immune reaction in children with CD when given in an otherwise gluten-free diet, indicating that the reaction requires gluten challenge. Anti-avenin antibodies were equal in the two study groups, and these findings strengthen the clinical impression that oats can be tolerated by the majority of patients with CD.

Keywords
Anti-avenin antibodies; avenin; coeliac disease; oats
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-14132 (URN)10.1080/00365520510023945 (DOI)
Available from: 2006-11-06 Created: 2006-11-06 Last updated: 2009-05-19
Sjö, A., Magnusson, K.-E. & Holmgren Peterson, K. (2005). Association of a-dystrobrevin with reorganizing tight junctions. Journal of Membrane Biology, 203(1), 21-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of a-dystrobrevin with reorganizing tight junctions
2005 (English)In: Journal of Membrane Biology, ISSN 0022-2631, E-ISSN 1432-1424, Vol. 203, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Alpha-dystrobrevin (a-DB) has been described primarily as a cytoplasmic component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex in skeletal muscle cells. Isoforms of a-DB show different localization in cells and tissues, at basolateral membranes in epithelial cells, dystrobrevins mediate contact with the extracellular matrix, peripheral and transmembrane proteins and the filamentous actin cytoskeleton. Beside their structural role, a-DBs are assumed to be important in cell signalling and cell differentiation. We have primarily assessed the role of a-DB in two epithelial cell lines (MDCK I, HT 29), which represent different developmental stages and exhibit distinct permeability characteristics. Using a polyclonal anti-a-DB antibody, we have investigated its expression, localization and association with tight junction (TJ)- associated proteins (ZO-1, occludin) before and after protein kinase C (PKC) activation with phorbol myristate acetate. Distinct subsets of a-DB isoforms were detected in the two cell lines by immunoblotting. In both cell lines there was submembranous localization of a-DB both apically and basolaterally, shown with confocal imaging. PKC activation caused a reorganization of TJ, which was parallel to increased localization of a-DB to TJ areas, most pronounced in MDCK I cells. Moreover, actin and ZO-1 co-immunoprecipitated with a-DB, as displayed with immunoblotting. Our findings suggest that a-dystrobrevin specifically is associated with the tight junctions during their reorganization. © Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2005.

Keywords
Dystrobrevin, Dystrophin-glycoprotein complex, Epithelium, Protein kinase C, Tight junction
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45532 (URN)10.1007/s00232-004-0728-1 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Immerstrand, C., Nilsson, H., Lindroth, M., Sundqvist, T., Magnusson, K.-E. & Holmgren-Peterson, K. (2004). Height changes associated with pigment aggregation in Xenopus laevis melanophores. Bioscience Reports, 24(3), 203-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Height changes associated with pigment aggregation in Xenopus laevis melanophores
Show others...
2004 (English)In: Bioscience Reports, ISSN 0144-8463, E-ISSN 1573-4935, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 203-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Melanophores are pigment cells found in the skin of lower vertebrates. The brownish-black pigment melanin is stored in organelles called melanosomes. In response to different stimuli, the cells can redistribute the melanosomes, and thereby change colour. During melanosome aggregation, a height increase has been observed in fish and frog melanophores across the cell centre. The mechanism by which the cell increases its height is unknown. Changes in cell shape can alter the electrical properties of the cell, and thereby be detected in impedance measurements. We have in earlier studies of Xenopus laevis melanophores shown that pigment aggregation can be revealed as impedance changes, and therefore we were interested in investigating the height changes associated with pigment aggregation further. Accordingly, we quantified the changes in cell height by performing vertical sectioning with confocal microscopy. In analogy with theories explaining the leading edge of migrating cells, we investigated the possibility that the elevation of plasma membrane is caused by local swelling due to influx of water through HgC12-sensitive aquaporins. We also measured the height of the microtubule structures to assess whether they are involved in the height increase. Our results show that pigment aggregation in X. laevis melanophores resulted in a significant height increase, which was substantially larger when aggregation was induced by latrunculin than with melatonin. Moreover, the elevation of the plasma membrane did not correlate with influx of water through aquaporins or formation of new microtubules, Rather, the accumulation of granules seemed to drive the change in cell height.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-31125 (URN)10.1007/s10540-005-2581-6 (DOI)16209129 (PubMedID)16859 (Local ID)16859 (Archive number)16859 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-09 Created: 2009-10-09 Last updated: 2017-12-13Bibliographically approved
Sjö, A., Magnusson, K.-E. & Holmgren Peterson, K. (2003). Distinct Effects of Protein Kinase C on the Barrier Function at Different Developmental Stages. Bioscience Reports, 23(2-3), 87-102
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distinct Effects of Protein Kinase C on the Barrier Function at Different Developmental Stages
2003 (English)In: Bioscience Reports, ISSN 0144-8463, E-ISSN 1573-4935, Vol. 23, no 2-3, p. 87-102Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We show here, that activation of protein kinase C by the phorbol ester PMA improves barrier function in colon carcinoma (HT 29) cells. By contrast, in canine kidney (MDCK I) cells it caused increased permeability and opening of tight junctions; the latter has also been noticed in other studies. Thus, with PMA confluent HT 29 cells responded with a reduced passage of 330 kDa sodium fluorescein, increased transepithelial electrical resistance, and a change in the cell shape of the HT 29 cells from an irregular to a regular, hexagonal form. Confocal imaging revealed parallel distinct changes in the staining of occludin and caludin-1, viz. a translocation from cytoplasmic clusters to apical cell–cell contacts. Interestingly, in both cell lines protein kinase A activation caused a decreased in the threonine phosphorylation of occludin that correlated with tight junction assembly in HT 29 cells and tight junction disassembly in MDCK I cells. We conclude that protein kinase C regulation of the epithelial barrier involves specific molecular mechanisms and achieves distinct effects at different developmental stages.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-26487 (URN)10.1023/A:1025524323842 (DOI)000185101500004 ()11043 (Local ID)11043 (Archive number)11043 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-08 Created: 2009-10-08 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications