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Unosson, Mitra
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Copanitsanou, P., Valkeapää, K., Cabrera, E., Katajisto, J., Leino-Kilpi, H., Sigurdardottir, A. K., . . . Lemonidou, C. (2017). Total Joint Arthroplasty Patients Education on Financial Issues and Its Connection to Reported Out-of-Pocket Costs-A European Study. Nursing forum, 52(2), 97-106
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Total Joint Arthroplasty Patients Education on Financial Issues and Its Connection to Reported Out-of-Pocket Costs-A European Study
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2017 (English)In: Nursing forum, ISSN 0029-6473, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 97-106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Total joint arthroplasty is accompanied by significant costs. In nursing, patient education on financial issues is considered important. Our purpose was to examine the possible association between the arthroplasty patients financial knowledge and their out-of-pocket costs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
Keywords
Costs; patient education; patient expectations; surgery; total joint arthroplasty
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146072 (URN)10.1111/nuf.12171 (DOI)27441849 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-27 Created: 2018-03-27 Last updated: 2018-03-27
Klemetti, S., Leino-Kilpi, H., Charalambous, A., Copanitsanou, P., Ingadottir, B., Istomina, N., . . . Valkeapää, K. (2016). Information and Control Preferences and Their Relationship With the Knowledge Received Among European Joint Arthroplasty Patients.. Orthopedic Nursing, 35(3), 174-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information and Control Preferences and Their Relationship With the Knowledge Received Among European Joint Arthroplasty Patients.
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2016 (English)In: Orthopedic Nursing, ISSN 0744-6020, E-ISSN 1542-538X, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 174-182Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of joint arthroplasties is increasing internationally, putting increased emphasis on patient education. PURPOSE: This study describes information and controlpreferences of patients with joint arthroplasty in seven European countries, and explores their relationships with patients' received knowledge. METHODS: The data (n = 1,446) were collected during 2009-2012 with the Krantz Health Opinion Survey and the Received Knowledge of Hospital Patient scale. RESULTS: European patients with joint arthroplasty had low preferences. Older patients had less information preferences than younger patients (p = .0001). In control preferences there were significant relationships with age (p = .021), employment in healthcare/social services (p = .033), chronic illness (p = .002), and country (p = .0001). Received knowledge of the patients did not have any relationships with information preferences. Instead, higher control preferences were associated with less received knowledge. CONCLUSION: The relationship between European joint arthroplasty patients' preferences and the knowledge they have received requires further research. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129203 (URN)10.1097/NOR.0000000000000246 (DOI)000380967300005 ()27187223 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:This study was financially supported by Finland-University of Turku; the Academy of Finland; the Finnish Association of Nursing Research; the Finnish Foundation of Nursing Education; Cyprus-the Cyprus University of Technology; Spain-Colegio Oficial de Enfermeria de Barcelona; Sweden-the Swedish Rheumatism Association; Iceland-the Landspitali University Hospital Research Fund; the Akureyri Hospital Science Fund; the University of Akureyri Science Fund; the KEA Fund, Akureyri; the Icelandic Nurses' Association Science Fund; Lithuania-Klaipeda University.

Available from: 2016-06-13 Created: 2016-06-13 Last updated: 2017-05-01Bibliographically approved
Ekdahl, A. W., Alwin, J., Eckerblad, J., Husberg, M., Jaarsma, T., Lindh Mazya, A., . . . Carlsson, P. (2016). Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 17(3), 263-268
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Term Evaluation of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment: A Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT): Clinical Outcomes and Total Costs After 36 Months
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2016 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To compare the effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) as a complement to usual care in an outpatient setting with those of usual care alone. The assessment was performed 36 months after study inclusion. Design: Randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded, single-center trial. Setting: A geriatric ambulatory unit in a municipality in the southeast of Sweden. Participants: Community-dwelling individuals aged >= 75 years who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion. Participants were randomized to the intervention group (IG) or control group (CG). Intervention: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care for 24 to 31 months at the geriatric ambulatory unit in addition to usual care. Outcome measures: Mortality, transfer to nursing home, days in hospital, and total costs of health and social care after 36 months. Results: Mean age (SD) of participants was 82.5 (4.9) years. Participants in the IG (n = 208) lived 69 days longer than did those in the CG (n = 174); 27.9% (n = 58) of participants in the IG and 38.5% (n = 67) in the CG died (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.12, P =.026). The mean number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (15.1 [SD 18.4]) than in the CG (21.0 [SD 25.0], P =.01). Mean overall costs during the 36-month period did not differ between the IG and CG (USD 71,905 [SD 85,560] and USD 65,626 [SD 66,338], P =.43). Conclusions: CGA-based care resulted in longer survival and fewer days in hospital, without significantly higher cost, at 3 years after baseline. These findings add to the evidence of CGAs superiority over usual care in outpatient settings. As CGA-based care leads to important positive outcomes, this method should be used more extensively in the treatment of older people to meet their needs. (c) 2016 AMDA - The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2016
Keywords
Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment; total costs of care; outpatient geriatric care; mortality; hospitalizations
National Category
Clinical Medicine Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126830 (URN)10.1016/j.jamda.2015.12.008 (DOI)000370950000014 ()26805750 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Ostergotland Regional authority in Sweden [LIO-124301]; Linkoping University in Sweden; Stahl Foundation in Sweden [LIO-194541]; Skane Regional authority in Sweden

Available from: 2016-04-07 Created: 2016-04-05 Last updated: 2017-05-03
Ekdahl, A. W., Wirehn, A.-B., Alwin, J., Jaarsma, T., Unosson, M., Husberg, M., . . . Carlsson, P. (2015). Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 16(6), 497-503
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Costs and Effects of an Ambulatory Geriatric Unit (the AGe-FIT Study): A Randomized Controlled Trial
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2015 (English)In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1538-9375, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To examine costs and effects of care based on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) provided by an ambulatory geriatric care unit (AGU) in addition to usual care.

DESIGN: Assessor-blinded, single-center randomized controlled trial.

SETTING: AGU in an acute hospital in southeastern Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS: Community-dwelling individuals aged 75 years or older who had received inpatient hospital care 3 or more times in the past 12 months and had 3 or more concomitant medical diagnoses were eligible for study inclusion and randomized to the intervention group (IG; n = 208) or control group (CG; n = 174). Mean age (SD) was 82.5 (4.9) years.

INTERVENTION: Participants in the IG received CGA-based care at the AGU in addition to usual care.

OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was number of hospitalizations. Secondary outcomes were days in hospital and nursing home, mortality, cost of public health and social care, participant' sense of security in care, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL).

RESULTS: Baseline characteristics did not differ between groups. The number of hospitalizations did not differ between the IG (2.1) and CG (2.4), but the number of inpatient days was lower in the IG (11.1 vs 15.2; P = .035). The IG showed trends of reduced mortality (hazard ratio 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.988-2.310; P = .057) and an increased sense of security in care interaction. No difference in HRQoL was observed. Costs for the IG and CG were 33,371£ (39,947£) and 30,490£ (31,568£; P = .432).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study of CGA-based care was performed in an ambulatory care setting, in contrast to the greater part of studies of the effects of CGA, which have been conducted in hospital settings. This study confirms the superiority of this type of care to elderly people in terms of days in hospital and sense of security in care interaction and that a shift to more accessible care for older people with multimorbidity is possible without increasing costs. This study can aid the planning of future interventions for older people.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446757.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Comprehensive geriatric assessment; ambulatory geriatric care; costs; hospitalization; multimorbidity; randomized controlled trial; security
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118967 (URN)10.1016/j.jamda.2015.01.074 (DOI)000355134100009 ()25703450 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-06-05 Created: 2015-06-05 Last updated: 2016-04-24
Klemetti, S., Leino-Kilpi, H., Cabrera, E., Copanitsanou, P., Ingadottir, B., Istomina, N., . . . Valkeapää, K. (2015). Difference Between Received and Expected Knowledge of Patients Undergoing Knee or Hip Replacement in Seven European Countries.. Clinical Nursing Research, 24(6), 624-643
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Difference Between Received and Expected Knowledge of Patients Undergoing Knee or Hip Replacement in Seven European Countries.
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2015 (English)In: Clinical Nursing Research, ISSN 1054-7738, E-ISSN 1552-3799, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 624-643Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the study was to examine received and expected knowledge of patients with knee/hip arthroplasty in seven European countries. The goal was to obtain information for developing empowering patient education. The data were collected (during 2009-2012) from patients (n = 943) with hip/knee arthroplasty prior to scheduled preoperative education and before discharge with the Received Knowledge of hospital patient scale (RKhp) and Expected Knowledge of hospital patient scale (EKhp). Patients' knowledge expectations were high but the level of received knowledge did not correspond to expectations. The difference between received and expected knowledge was higher in Greece and Sweden compared with Finland (p < .0001, p < .0001), Spain (p < .0001, p = .001), and Lithuania (p = .005, p = .003), respectively. Patients' knowledge expectations are important in tailoring patient education. To achieve high standards in the future, scientific research collaboration on empowering patient education is needed between European countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116634 (URN)10.1177/1054773814549992 (DOI)000364723000004 ()25230804 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Finland-University of Turku; Academy of Finland; Finnish Association of Nursing Research; Finnish Foundation of Nursing Education; Cyprus-the Cyprus University of Technology; Spain-Colegio Oficial de Enfermeria de Barcelona; Sweden-the Swedish Rheumatism 

Available from: 2015-03-30 Created: 2015-03-30 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Tödt, K., Skargren, E., Jakobsson, P., Theander, K. & Unosson, M. (2015). Factors associated with low physical activity in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A cross-sectional study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 29(4), 697-707
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors associated with low physical activity in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A cross-sectional study
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2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 697-707Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

Low physical activity (PA) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with poor prognosis. In addition physical activity seems to be low early in the disease. The aim in this study was to describe the level of PA in patients with stable COPD, and to explore factors associated with low PA, with a focus on fatigue, symptom burden and body composition.

Methods

In a cross-sectional study 101 patients (52 women) with COPD  were classified having low, moderate or high PA according to the International Physical Activity Questionnaire – Short. Fatigue, dyspnoea, depression and anxiety, symptom burden, body composition, physical capacity (lung function, exercise capacity, muscle strength), exacerbation rate and systemic inflammation were assessed. A multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent associations with low PA.

Results

Mean age was 68 (+/- 7) years and mean percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in one second was 50 (+/-16.5). Forty-two patients reported a low PA level, while 34 moderate and 25 reported high levels. Factors independently associated with low PA, presented as odds ratio (95% confidence interval), were severe fatigue 5.87 (1.23 – 28.12), exercise capacity 0.99 (0.99 – 1.0) and the number of pack years 1.04 (1.01 – 1.07). No relationship was found between depression, anxiety, body composition, exacerbation rate or systemic inflammation and PA.

Conclusions

Severe fatigue, worse exercise capacity and a higher amount of smoking were independently associated with low PA. Promoting physical activity is important in all patients with COPD. Our result suggests that patients with severe fatigue might need specific strategies to become more physically active.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105194 (URN)10.1111/scs.12200 (DOI)000368345900010 ()
Note

The author belong to the Department of Mecical and Health Science and is Ph.D. student at the Department of Social and Welfare Studies.

Vid tiden för disputationen förelåg publikationen endast som manuskript

Funding agencies: Swedish Heart and Lung foundation; Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden; County Council of Ostergotland

Available from: 2014-03-12 Created: 2014-03-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Dong, H.-J., Marcusson, J., Wressle, E. & Unosson, M. (2015). Obese very old women have low relative handgrip strength, poor physical function, and difficulty in daily living. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 19(1), 20-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obese very old women have low relative handgrip strength, poor physical function, and difficulty in daily living
2015 (English)In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate how anthropometric and body composition variables, and handgrip strength (HS) affect physical function and independent daily living in 88-year-old Swedish women.

Participants: A cross-sectional analysis of 83 community-dwelling women, who were 88 years old with normal weight (n=30), overweight (n=29), and obesity (n=24) in Linköping, Sweden, was performed.

Measures: Assessments of body weight (Wt), height, waist circumference (WC), and arm circumference were performed by using an electronic scale and measuring tape. Tricep skinfold thickness was measured by a skinfold calliper. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and HS was recorded with an electronic grip force instrument. Linear regression was used to determine the contributions of parameters as a single predictor or as a ratio with HS to physical function (Short Form-36, SF-36PF) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL).

Results: Obese women had greater absolute FM and FFM, and lower HS corrected for FFM and HS-based ratios (i.e., HS/Wt, HS/body mass index [BMI]) than their normal weight and overweight counterparts. After adjusting for physical activity levels and the number of chronic diseases, HS-based ratios explained more variance in SF-36PF scoring (R2: 0.52–0.54) than single anthropometric and body composition variables (R2: 0.45–0.51). WC, HS, and HS-based ratios (HS/Wt and HS/FFM) were also associated with the number of IADL with no difficulty.

Conclusion: Obese very old women have a high WC, but their HS is relatively low in relation to their Wt and FFM. These parameters are better than BMI for predicting physical function and independent daily living.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
Keywords
Very old; Handgrip strength; Body composition; Physical function; Instrumental activities of daily living
National Category
Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105215 (URN)10.1007/s12603-014-0512-6 (DOI)000348024800003 ()
Available from: 2014-03-13 Created: 2014-03-13 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Eckerblad, J., Theander, K., Ekdahl, A., Unosson, M., Wiréhn, A.-B., Milberg, A., . . . Jaarsma, T. (2015). Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study. BMC Geriatrics, 15(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity: a cross-sectional study
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2015 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Globally, the population is ageing and lives with several chronic diseases for decades. A high symptom burden is associated with a high use of healthcare, admissions to nursing homes, and reduced quality of life. The aims of this study were to describe the multidimensional symptom profile and symptom burden in community-dwelling older people with multimorbidity, and to describe factors related to symptom burden. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 378 community-dwelling people greater than= 75 years, who had been hospitalized greater than= 3 times during the previous year, had greater than= 3 diagnoses in their medical records. The Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale was used to assess the prevalence, frequency, severity, distress and symptom burden of 31 symptoms. A multiple linear regression was performed to identify factors related to total symptom burden. Results: The mean number of symptoms per participant was 8.5 (4.6), and the mean total symptom burden score was 0.62 (0.41). Pain was the symptom with the highest prevalence, frequency, severity and distress. Half of the study group reported the prevalence of lack of energy and a dry mouth. Poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diagnoses of the digestive system were independently related to the total symptom burden score. Conclusion: The older community-dwelling people with multimorbidity in this study suffered from a high symptom burden with a high prevalence of pain. Persons with poor vision, likelihood of depression, and diseases of the digestive system are at risk of a higher total symptom burden and might need age-specific standardized guidelines for appropriate management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Chronic disease; Older people; Symptom assessment
National Category
Sociology Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114010 (URN)10.1186/1471-2318-15-1 (DOI)000347569800001 ()25559550 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Faculty of Health sciences, Linkoping University; county council of Ostergotland; Signe and Olof Wallenius trust fund; Solstickan; Swedish Association of Geriatric Medicine; Mundipharma

Available from: 2015-02-06 Created: 2015-02-05 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Tödt, K., Skargren, E., Kentson, M., Theander, K., Jakobsson, P. & Unosson, M. (2014). Experience of fatigue, and its relationship to physical capacity and disease severity in men and women with COPD. The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 9, 17-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experience of fatigue, and its relationship to physical capacity and disease severity in men and women with COPD
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2014 (English)In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 9, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Several differences have been reported in the clinical characteristics of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) between men and women. Differences have been found in the association between respiratory symptoms and lung function, and in the factors associated with dyspnea. This raises the question of whether there are differences between the sexes in the relationship between fatigue, the second most prevalent symptom, and the variables of physical capacity and disease severity. Objectives: To examine the experience of fatigue and its relationship to physical capacity and disease severity in men and women with COPD. Methods: In a cross-sectional study 121 patients with COPD (54 men and 67 women), the experience of fatigue (frequency, duration, and severity) and physical capacity (lung function, 6-minute walk distance [6MWD], grip strength, and timed-stand test) were assessed. Disease severity was graded according to the Body mass index, airway Obstruction, Dyspnoea and Exercise capacity (BODE) index. Two multiple logistic regression models were tested, both of which were performed separately in men and women, to examine the association between the experience of fatigue and variables of physical capacity and the BODE index. Results: Eighty-nine (73.6%) patients experienced fatigue, with similar proportions in men and women. The men with fatigue had worse physical capacity and more severe disease than did the men without fatigue: for men with and without fatigue, respectively, the percent of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (mean [standard deviation]) was 47 (14) vs 64 (17); the 6MWD (mean [standard deviation]) was 398 (138) vs 539 (105) m; and the BODE index (median [quartile 1-3]) was 3 (2-5) vs 1 (0-1) (Pless than0.01). In women, only higher leg fatigue post-6MWD was seen among those experiencing fatigue compared with women without fatigue: for women with and without fatigue, respectively, leg fatigue (median [quartile 1-3]) was 4 (3-5) vs 2 (0-3) (Pless than0.001). The regression models showed that the 6MWD and the BODE index were associated with fatigue in both men and women, but in women, leg fatigue remained an independent associate in both models. Conclusion: Exercise capacity and disease severity were associated with fatigue in both men and women. In women, leg fatigue was strongly associated with fatigue, which warrants further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove Medical Press, 2014
Keywords
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; disease state; functional capacity; sex differences; symptom experience; leg fatigue
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103279 (URN)10.2147/COPD.S52506 (DOI)000328463500001 ()
Note

The author belong to the Department of Mecical and Health Science and is Ph.D. student at the Department of Social and Welfare Studies.

Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Johansson Stark, Å., Ingadottir, B., Salanterä, S., Sigurdardottir, A. K., Valkeapää, K., Bachrach-Lindström, M. & Unosson, M. (2014). Fulfilment of knowledge expectations and emotional state among people undergoing hip replacement: A multi-national survey. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 51(11), 1491-1499
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fulfilment of knowledge expectations and emotional state among people undergoing hip replacement: A multi-national survey
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2014 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 1491-1499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Patient education in connection with hip replacement is intended to prepare patients for surgery, discharge and postoperative recovery. Patients experience symptoms and emotions due to disease or upcoming surgery which can affect how their knowledge expectations are fulfilled.

OBJECTIVES:

To describe the differences between received and expected knowledge in patients undergoing elective hip replacement in three Nordic countries, and to analyse how these differences are related to patients' characteristics, preoperative symptoms and emotions.

DESIGN:

A descriptive, prospective survey with two data collection points; before admission and at hospital discharge after surgery.

SETTINGS:

Two Finnish, three Icelandic and two Swedish hospitals.

PARTICIPANTS:

The population consisted of patients on a waiting list for hip replacement. Of the consecutively included patients, 320 answered questionnaires both before admission and at discharge and were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 64 years, and 55% were women.

METHODS:

Structured questionnaires were used; the knowledge expectations of hospital patients scale and self-reported scales for symptoms and emotions before admission and received knowledge of hospital patients scale at discharge. Fulfilment of knowledge expectation was assessed by calculating the difference between received and expected knowledge with a paired sample t-test. A multiple stepwise regression model was used to explain the variance of fulfilled knowledge expectations.

RESULTS:

Patients expected more knowledge than they received (p<0.001) and 77% of them had unfulfilled knowledge expectations. Patients with a higher level of education were more likely to have unfulfilled knowledge expectations. A higher level of education was also related to a greater difference between received and expected knowledge. The difference was more correlated with patients' emotions than their symptoms. A depressive state was the major predictor of the variance in the difference between received and expected knowledge.

CONCLUSIONS:

In order to better support patients by education it is necessary to assess their emotional state, educational level and knowledge expectations before surgery.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Emotions, Empowering knowledge, Hip replacement, Knowledge expectations, Orthopaedic nursing, Patient education, Symptoms
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109769 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2014.03.006 (DOI)000343351900009 ()24751503 (PubMedID)
Projects
Empowering Patient Education
Available from: 2014-08-27 Created: 2014-08-27 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
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