liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Ganda Mall, J.-P., Casado-Bedmar, M., Winberg, M. E., Brummer, R. J., Schoultz, I. & Keita, Å. (2018). A ß-Glucan-Based Dietary Fiber Reduces Mast Cell-Induced Hyperpermeability in Ileum From Patients With Crohns Disease and Control Subjects. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 24(1), 166-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A ß-Glucan-Based Dietary Fiber Reduces Mast Cell-Induced Hyperpermeability in Ileum From Patients With Crohns Disease and Control Subjects
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 166-178Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Administration of ß-glucan has shown immune-enhancing effects. Our aim was to investigate whether ß-glucan could attenuate mast cell (MC)-induced hyperpermeability in follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) and villus epithelium (VE) of patients with Crohns disease (CD) and in noninflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-controls. Further, we studied mechanisms of ß-glucan uptake and effects on MCs in vitro.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
Keywords
Crohn’s disease; intestinal permeability; ß-glucan
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146363 (URN)10.1093/ibd/izx002 (DOI)000427524400018 ()29272475 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-07 Created: 2018-04-07 Last updated: 2019-04-09
Yakymenko, O., Schoultz, I., Gullberg, E., Ström, M., Almer, S., Wallon, C., . . . Söderholm, J. D. (2018). Infliximab restores colonic barrier to adherent-invasive E. coli in Crohn's disease via effects on epithelial lipid rafts. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 53(6), 677-684
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infliximab restores colonic barrier to adherent-invasive E. coli in Crohn's disease via effects on epithelial lipid rafts
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 677-684Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Infliximab is important in the therapeutic arsenal of Crohn’s disease (CD). However, its effect on mucosal barrier function is not fully understood. Adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) are important in CD pathophysiology, but the transmucosal uptake routes are partly unknown. We investigated effects of infliximab on uptake of colon-specific AIEC HM427 across CD colonic mucosa.

Materials and methods: Endoscopic biopsies from non-inflamed colon of seven patients with CD, before and after two infliximab infusions, and eight non-inflammation controls, were mounted in Ussing chambers. Paracellular permeability (51Cr-EDTA) and transmucosal passage of GFP-expressing HM427 were studied. Mechanisms of HM427 transepithelial transport were investigated in Caco-2 monolayers treated with TNF, in the presence of infliximab and/or endocytosis inhibitors.

Results: Before infliximab treatment, colonic passage of HM427 [CD: 2475 CFU (450–3000); controls 1163(225–1950)] and 51Cr-EDTA permeability were increased in CD (p < .05), but were restored to control levels by infliximab (CD: 150 (18.8–1069)). In TNF-exposed Caco-2 monolayers HM427 transport and lipid rafts/HM427 co-localization was decreased by infliximab. The lipid raft inhibitor methyl-β-cyclodextrin decreased HM427 transport.

Conclusion: Infliximab restored the colonic barrier to AIEC in CD; an effect partially mediated by blocking lipid rafts in epithelial cells. This ability likely contributes to infliximab’s clinical efficacy in colonic CD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2018
Keywords
Inflammatory bowel disease, microbiology, large intestine, intestinal barrier function, adherent invasive E. coli
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-147615 (URN)10.1080/00365521.2018.1458146 (DOI)000438146900008 ()29688802 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council-Medicine [VR-MH 2014-02537]; ALF Grants Region Ostergotland

Available from: 2018-04-27 Created: 2018-04-27 Last updated: 2019-04-30Bibliographically approved
Parsons, B. N., Wigley, P., Simpson, H. L., Williams, J. M., Humphrey, S., Salisbury, A.-M., . . . Campbell, B. J. (2014). Dietary Supplementation with Soluble Plantain Non-Starch Polysaccharides Inhibits Intestinal Invasion of Salmonella Typhimurium in the Chicken. PLoS ONE, 9(2), 87658
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary Supplementation with Soluble Plantain Non-Starch Polysaccharides Inhibits Intestinal Invasion of Salmonella Typhimurium in the Chicken
Show others...
2014 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 87658-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Soluble fibres (non-starch polysaccharides, NSP) from edible plants but particularly plantain banana (Musa spp.), have been shown in vitro and ex vivo to prevent various enteric pathogens from adhering to, or translocating across, the human intestinal epithelium, a property that we have termed contrabiotic. Here we report that dietary plantain fibre prevents invasion of the chicken intestinal mucosa by Salmonella. In vivo experiments were performed with chicks fed from hatch on a pellet diet containing soluble plantain NSP (0 to 200 mg/d) and orally infected with S. Typhimurium 4/74 at 8 d of age. Birds were sacrificed 3, 6 and 10 d post-infection. Bacteria were enumerated from liver, spleen and caecal contents. In vitro studies were performed using chicken caecal crypts and porcine intestinal epithelial cells infected with Salmonella enterica serovars following pre-treatment separately with soluble plantain NSP and acidic or neutral polysaccharide fractions of plantain NSP, each compared with saline vehicle. Bacterial adherence and invasion were assessed by gentamicin protection assay. In vivo dietary supplementation with plantain NSP 50 mg/d reduced invasion by S. Typhimurium, as reflected by viable bacterial counts from splenic tissue, by 98.9% (95% CI, 98.1-99.7; Pless than0.0001). In vitro studies confirmed that plantain NSP (5-10 mg/ml) inhibited adhesion of S. Typhimurium 4/74 to a porcine epithelial cell-line (73% mean inhibition (95% CI, 64-81); Pless than0.001) and to primary chick caecal crypts (82% mean inhibition (95% CI, 75-90); Pless than0.001). Adherence inhibition was shown to be mediated via an effect on the epithelial cells and Ussing chamber experiments with ex-vivo human ileal mucosa showed that this effect was associated with increased short circuit current but no change in electrical resistance. The inhibitory activity of plantain NSP lay mainly within the acidic/pectic (homogalacturonan-rich) component. Supplementation of chick feed with plantain NSP was well tolerated and shows promise as a simple approach for reducing invasive salmonellosis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2014
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105237 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0087658 (DOI)000330626900093 ()
Available from: 2014-03-14 Created: 2014-03-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Vanheel, H., Vicario, M., Vanuytsel, T., Van Oudenhove, L., Martinez, C., Keita, Å., . . . Farre, R. (2014). Impaired duodenal mucosal integrity and low-grade inflammation in functional dyspepsia. Gut, 63(2), 262-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impaired duodenal mucosal integrity and low-grade inflammation in functional dyspepsia
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Gut, ISSN 0017-5749, E-ISSN 1468-3288, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 262-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective Functional dyspepsia (FD) is an extremely common functional gastrointestinal disorder, the pathophysiology of which is poorly understood. We hypothesised that impaired intestinal barrier function is involved in the onset and persistence of this disorder by inducing low-grade inflammation. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate duodenal mucosal integrity and low-grade inflammation in patients with FD. Design Duodenal biopsy specimens were obtained from 15 patients with FD fulfilling the Rome III criteria and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and paracellular permeability were measured in Ussing chambers. Expression of cell-to-cell adhesion proteins was evaluated by real-time PCR, western blot and/or immunofluorescence. Numbers of mast cells, eosinophils and intraepithelial lymphocytes were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results Patients with FD displayed lower TEER and increased paracellular passage compared with healthy controls, which is indicative of impaired mucosal integrity. In addition, abnormal expression of cell-to-cell adhesion proteins at the level of tight junctions, adherens junctions and desmosomes was shown. Furthermore, patients were characterised by the presence of low-grade inflammation, as demonstrated by increased infiltration of mucosal mast cells and eosinophils. A significant association between the expression level of several cell-to-cell adhesion proteins, the extent of increased permeability and the severity of low-grade inflammation was found. Conclusions These findings challenge the classical paradigm that patients with FD show no structural changes in the gastrointestinal tract. We suggest that impaired intestinal barrier function is a pathophysiological mechanism in FD. Thus, restoration of intestinal barrier integrity may be a potential therapeutic target for treating patients with FD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group, 2014
Keywords
FUNCTIONAL DYSPEPSIA; DUODENAL MUCOSA; INFLAMMATION
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104113 (URN)10.1136/gutjnl-2012-303857 (DOI)000329488100015 ()
Available from: 2014-02-07 Created: 2014-02-07 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Wang, A., Keita, Å. V., Phan, V., McKay, C. M., Schoultz, I., Lee, J., . . . Mckay, D. M. (2014). Targeting Mitochondria-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species to Reduce Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction and Colitis. American Journal of Pathology, 184(9), 2516-2527
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeting Mitochondria-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species to Reduce Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction and Colitis
Show others...
2014 (English)In: American Journal of Pathology, ISSN 0002-9440, E-ISSN 1525-2191, Vol. 184, no 9, p. 2516-2527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Epithelial permeability is often increased in inflammatory bowel diseases. We hypothesized that perturbed mitochondrial function would cause barrier dysfunction and hence epithelial mitochondria could be targeted to treat intestinal inflammation. Mitochondrial dysfunction was induced in human colon-derived epithelial cell lines or colonic biopsy specimens using dinitrophenol, and barrier function was assessed by transepithelial flux of Escherichia coil with or without mitochondria-targeted antioxidant (MTA) cotreatment. The impact of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants on gut permeability and dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in mice was tested. Mitochondrial superoxide evoked by dinitrophenol elicited significant internalization and transtocation of E. coil across epithelia and control colonic biopsy specimens, which was more striking in Crohns disease biopsy specimens; the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, MitoTEMPO, inhibited these barrier defects. Increased gut permeability and reduced epithelial mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel expression were observed 3 days after DSS. These changes and the severity of DSS-colitis were reduced by MitoTEMPO treatment. In vitro DSS-stimulated IL-8 production by epithelia was reduced by MitoTEMPO. Metabolic stress evokes significant penetration of commensal bacteria across the epithelium, which is mediated by mitochondria-derived superoxide acting as a signaling, not a cytotoxic, molecule. MitoTEMPO inhibited this barrier dysfunction and suppressed colitis in DSS-colitis, likely via enhancing barrier function and inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production. These novel findings support consideration of MTAs in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function and the management of inflammatory bowel diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Society for Investigative Pathology (ASIP), 2014
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-110962 (URN)10.1016/j.ajpath.2014.05.019 (DOI)000341283900016 ()25034594 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Canadian Institutes of Health Research [MPO 126005]; Swedish Medical Research Council

Available from: 2014-10-03 Created: 2014-10-01 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Carlsson, A. H., Yakymenko, O., Olivier, I., Håkansson, F., Postma, E., Keita, A. V. & Soderholm, J. D. (2013). Faecalibacterium prausnitzii supernatant improves intestinal barrier function in mice DSS colitis. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 48(10), 1136-1144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Faecalibacterium prausnitzii supernatant improves intestinal barrier function in mice DSS colitis
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0036-5521, E-ISSN 1502-7708, Vol. 48, no 10, p. 1136-1144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. The intestinal microbiota plays a substantial role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Faecalibacterium prausnitzii (FP) is underrepresented in IBD patients and have been suggested to have anti-inflammatory effects in mice. Increased intestinal permeability is common in IBD but the relationship between FP and intestinal barrier function has not been investigated. Our aim was to study treatment with FP supernatant on intestinal barrier function in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) colitis mice model. Material and methods. C57BL/6 mice received 3% DSS in tap water ad libitum during five days to induce colitis. From day 3 the mice received a daily gavage with FP supernatant or broth during seven days. Ileum and colon were mounted in Ussing chambers for permeability studies with Cr-51-EDTA and Escherichia coli K-12. Colon was saved for Western blot analyses of tight junction proteins. Results. DSS-treated mice showed significant weight loss and colon shortening. Gavage with FP supernatant resulted in a quicker recovery after DSS treatment and less extensive colonic shortening. Ileal mucosa of DSS mice showed a significant increase in Cr-51-EDTA-passage compared to controls. Cr-51-EDTA passage was significantly decreased in mice receiving FP supernatant. No significant differences were observed in passage of E. coli K12. Western blots showed a trend to increased claudin-1 and claudin-2 expressions in DSS mice. Conclusions. Supernatant of FP enhances the intestinal barrier function by affecting paracellular permeability, and may thereby attenuate the severity of DSS-induced colitis in mice. These findings suggest a potential role of FP in the treatment of IBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2013
Keywords
dextran sodium sulfate, inflammatory bowel disease, permeability, probiotics, tight junctions
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-99406 (URN)10.3109/00365521.2013.828773 (DOI)000324761000005 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council|VR-M: K2012-55X-12618-16-3|

Available from: 2013-10-17 Created: 2013-10-17 Last updated: 2018-04-27
Ermund, A., Gustafsson, J. K., Hansson, G. C. & Keita, Å. (2013). Mucus Properties and Goblet Cell Quantification in Mouse, Rat and Human Ileal Peyers Patches. PLoS ONE, 8(12), 83688
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mucus Properties and Goblet Cell Quantification in Mouse, Rat and Human Ileal Peyers Patches
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 12, p. 83688-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Peyers patches (PPs) are collections of lymphoid follicles in the small intestine, responsible for scanning the intestinal content for foreign antigens such as soluble molecules, particulate matter as well as intact bacteria and viruses. The immune cells of the patch are separated from the intestinal lumen by a single layer of epithelial cells, the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE). This epithelium covers the dome of the follicle and contains enterocyte-like cells and M cells, which are particularly specialized in taking up antigens from the gut. However, the presence and number of goblet cells as well as the presence of mucus on top of the FAE is controversial. When mouse ileal PPs were mounted in a horizontal Ussing-type chamber, we could observe a continuous mucus layer at mounting and new, easily removable mucus was released from the villi on the patch upon stimulation. Confocal imaging using fluorescent beads revealed a penetrable mucus layer covering the domes. Furthermore, immunostaining of FAE from mice, rats and humans with a specific antibody against the main component of intestinal mucus, the MUC2 mucin, clearly identify mucin-containing goblet cells. Transmission electron micrographs further support the identification of mucus releasing goblet cells on the domes of PPs in these species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2013
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103719 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0083688 (DOI)000328735700135 ()
Available from: 2014-01-24 Created: 2014-01-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Roberts, C. L., Keita, Å., Parsons, B. N., Prorok-Hamon, M., Knight, P., Winstanley, C., . . . Campbell, B. J. (2013). Soluble plantain fibre blocks adhesion and M-cell translocation of intestinal pathogens. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, 24(1), 97-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Soluble plantain fibre blocks adhesion and M-cell translocation of intestinal pathogens
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, ISSN 0955-2863, E-ISSN 1873-4847, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dietary fibres may have prebiotic effects mediated by promotion of beneficial bacteria. This study explores the possibility that soluble plant fibre may also improve health by inhibiting epithelial adhesion and translocation by pathogenic bacteria. We have focussed on soluble non-starch polysaccharide (NSP) from plantain bananas (Musa spp.) which previous studies showed to be particularly effective at blocking Escherichia coli epithelial adherence. In vitro and ex vivo studies assessed the ability of plantain NSP to inhibit epithelial cell adhesion and invasion of various bacterial pathogens, and to inhibit their translocation through microfold (M)-cells and human Peyers patches mounted in Ussing chambers. Plantain NSP showed dose-related inhibition of epithelial adhesion and M-cell translocation by a range of pathogens. At 5 mg/ml, a concentration readily achievable in the gut lumen, plantain NSP inhibited adhesion to Caco2 cells by Salmonella Typhimurium (85.0 +/- 8.2%, Pandlt;.01), Shigella sonnei (46.6 +/- 29.3%. Pandlt;.01), enterotoxigenic E.coli (56.1 +/- 23.7%, Pandlt;.05) and Clostridium difficile (67.6 +/- 12.3%, Pandlt;.001), but did not inhibit adhesion by enteropathogenic E.coli. Plantain NSP also inhibited invasion of Caco2 cells by S. Typhimurium (80.2 +/- 9.7%) and Sh. sonnei (46.7 +/- 13.4%); Pandlt;.01. Plantain NSP, 5 mg/ml, also inhibited translocation of S. Typhimurium and Sh. sonnei across M-cells by 73.3 +/- 5.2% and 46.4 +/- 7.7% respectively (Pandlt;.05). Similarly, S. Typhimurium translocation across Peyers patches was reduced 65.9 +/- 8.1% by plantain NSP (Pandlt;.01). Soluble plantain fibre can block epithelial adhesion and M-cell translocation of intestinal pathogens. This represents an important novel mechanism by which soluble dietary fibres can promote intestinal health and prevent infective diarrhoea. Crown Copyright

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Dietary fibre, Diarrhoea, Enteric infections, Peyers patches, M (microfold) cell, Mucosal immunology
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87958 (URN)10.1016/j.jnutbio.2012.02.013 (DOI)000312479700013 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|University of Liverpool Reach Out Growth Fund award|ROGF-N0306|Biotechnology & Biosciences Research Council|BB/G01969X/1|Liverpool National Institute for Health Research Specialist Biomedical Research Centre for Microbial Diseases|01CD1|Bo and Vera Ax:son Johnsson Foundation||Swedish Research Council||

Available from: 2013-01-28 Created: 2013-01-28 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Keita, Å., Carlsson, A. H., Cigehn, M., Ericson, A.-C., Mckay, D. M. & Söderholm, J. D. (2013). Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide regulates barrier function via mast cells in human intestinal follicle-associated epithelium and during stress in rats. Neurogastroenterology and Motility, 25(6), e406-e417
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide regulates barrier function via mast cells in human intestinal follicle-associated epithelium and during stress in rats
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, ISSN 1350-1925, E-ISSN 1365-2982, Vol. 25, no 6, p. e406-e417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) has been implicated as a regulator of intestinal barrier function and inflammation. Our aim was to elucidate the role of VIP in follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) and villus epithelium (VE) permeability following stress in rats and on human intestinal barrier function. Methods Rats were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) with VIP receptor-antagonists (anti-VPACs), a mast cell stabilizer, doxantrazole (DOX), or NaCl, and submitted to acute water avoidance stress. Ileal segments were mounted in Ussing chambers to assess 51chromium-edta (51Cr-edta) and Escherichia (E.) coli (strain K-12) permeability. Rat ileal and human ileal and colonic segments were exposed to VIP +/- anti-VPACs or DOX. An in vitro co-culture model of human FAE was used to study epithelial-VIP effects. VIP/VPACs distribution was assessed by microscopy. Key Results Stress increased 51Cr-edta and E.coli permeability in VE and FAE. The increases were abolished by i.p. injection of DOX or anti-VPACs. Ileal VIP-exposure ex vivo increased bacterial passage and this was reduced by DOX. In human FAE ex vivo, VIP treatment doubled bacterial uptake, which was normalized by DOX or anti-VPACs. No barrier effects were observed in human colonic tissue. VPACs were found in rat and human ileal follicles, with partial mast cell co-localization. The co-culture model confirmed VIPmast cellepithelial interactions in the regulation of barrier function. Conclusions andamp; Inferences Stress affects the FAE barrier by mechanisms involving VIP and VPACs on mucosal mast cells. We suggest a regulatory role for VIP in the control of ileal permeability that may be relevant to bacterialepithelial interactions in stress-related intestinal disorders.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
Inflammatory bowel disease, permeability, Peyers patch, Ussing chamber
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-94315 (URN)10.1111/nmo.12127 (DOI)000318945400005 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council|K2012-55X-12618-16-3|

Available from: 2013-06-24 Created: 2013-06-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Keita, Å. V. & Söderholm, J. D. (2012). Barrier dysfunction and bacterial uptake in the follicle-associated epithelium of ileal Crohns disease. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1258(1), 125-134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barrier dysfunction and bacterial uptake in the follicle-associated epithelium of ileal Crohns disease
2012 (English)In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, ISSN 0077-8923, E-ISSN 1749-6632, Vol. 1258, no 1, p. 125-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to control uptake across the mucosa and protect from harmful substances in the gut lumen is defined as intestinal barrier function. The etiology of Crohns disease is unknown, but genetic, environmental, and immunological factors all contribute. The frontline between these factors lies in the intestinal barrier. The most important inflammation-driving environmental factor in Crohns disease is the microbiota, where Esherichia coli strains have been assigned a key role. The first observable signs of Crohns disease are small aphtoid ulcers over Peyers patches and lymphoid follicles. The overlaying follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) is specialized for luminal sampling and is an entry site for antigens and bacteria. We have demonstrated increased E. coli uptake across the FAE in Crohns disease, which may initiate inflammation. This short review will discuss barrier dysfunction and bacteria in the context of ileal Crohns disease, and how the FAE might be the site of initial inflammation.

Keywords
adherent invasive E. coli; etiology; inflammatory bowel disease; pathogens; Peyer's patches
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-80250 (URN)10.1111/j.1749-6632.2012.06502.x (DOI)
Available from: 2012-08-23 Created: 2012-08-23 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6820-0215

Search in DiVA

Show all publications