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Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Öberg, M. (2018). A multicenter study evaluating the effect of the Swedish ACE-programme.. In: : . Paper presented at World Congress of Audiology Kapstaden, Sydafrika.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multicenter study evaluating the effect of the Swedish ACE-programme.
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162789 (URN)
Conference
World Congress of Audiology Kapstaden, Sydafrika
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2019-12-18
Öberg, M. (2018). Effekterna av interaktiv hörselrehabilitering. In: : . Paper presented at Nordiska Audiologiska sällskapet.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effekterna av interaktiv hörselrehabilitering
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Other Medical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162788 (URN)
Conference
Nordiska Audiologiska sällskapet
Available from: 2019-12-18 Created: 2019-12-18 Last updated: 2019-12-18
Öberg, M. (2018). Validering av HHIE-S. In: : . Paper presented at TeMA hörsel Rikskonferens i Audiology, Örebro.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validering av HHIE-S
2018 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-162816 (URN)
Conference
TeMA hörsel Rikskonferens i Audiology, Örebro
Available from: 2019-12-19 Created: 2019-12-19 Last updated: 2020-01-24
Brännström, J., Öberg, M., Ingo, E., Månsson, K. N., Andersson, G., Lunner, T. & Laplante-Lévesque, A. (2016). The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients. Internet Interventions, 4(1), 82-91
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The initial evaluation of an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clientsThe process of developing an internet-based support system for audiologists and first-time hearing aid clients
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2016 (English)In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 82-91Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126519 (URN)10.1016/j.invent.2016.01.002 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Öberg, M. (2016). Validation of the Swedish Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (Screening Version) and Evaluation of Its Effect in Hearing Aid Rehabilitation. TRENDS IN HEARING, 20(2331216516639234)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the Swedish Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (Screening Version) and Evaluation of Its Effect in Hearing Aid Rehabilitation
2016 (English)In: TRENDS IN HEARING, ISSN 2331-2165, Vol. 20, no 2331216516639234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Self-reports of subjective hearing difficulties by people with hearing loss may be a useful complement to audiometry in hearing aid rehabilitation. To be useful, such self-reports need to be reliable. This study investigated the reliability and the validity of the Swedish Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly (Screening Version; HHIE-S). Sixty-nine participants completed a questionnaire before hearing aid rehabilitation. Of these individuals, 49 completed hearing aid rehabilitation (aged between 23 and 94 years), and 41 of these 49 participants completed the questionnaire after completing the rehabilitation. The Swedish HHIE-S exhibited good internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha coefficient of .77). The questionnaire was effective for evaluating hearing aid rehabilitation, and a statistically significant reduction in hearing difficulties was observed. The clinicians found the questionnaire easy to administer and effective in hearing aid rehabilitation. The findings from the study support the use of the HHIE-S in clinical practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2016
Keywords
self-reports; hearing aid rehabilitation; activity limitation
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-130145 (URN)10.1177/2331216516639234 (DOI)000377851500001 ()27009755 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Ostergotland County Council Research Foundation

Available from: 2016-07-12 Created: 2016-07-11 Last updated: 2019-01-15
Öberg, M., Wänström, G., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2015). Behandlingsprocessens betydelse vid hörapparatanpassning. In: : . Paper presented at TeMA hörsel (Parallellsession 1) Malmö, Sverige, 25-27 mars 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behandlingsprocessens betydelse vid hörapparatanpassning
2015 (Swedish)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124036 (URN)
Conference
TeMA hörsel (Parallellsession 1) Malmö, Sverige, 25-27 mars 2015
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Naylor, G., Öberg, M., Wänström, G. & Lunner, T. (2015). Exploring the Effects of the Narrative Embodied in the Hearing Aid Fitting Process on Treatment Outcomes. Ear and Hearing, 36(5), 517-526
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the Effects of the Narrative Embodied in the Hearing Aid Fitting Process on Treatment Outcomes
2015 (English)In: Ear and Hearing, ISSN 0196-0202, E-ISSN 1538-4667, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 517-526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: There is strong evidence from other fields of health, and growing evidence in audiology, that characteristics of the process of intervention as perceived by the client (embodied narratives) can have significant effects on treatment outcomes, independent of the technical properties of the intervention itself. This phenomenon deserves examination because studies of technical interventions that fail to take account of it may reach erroneous conclusions and because clinical practice can put such effects to therapeutic use. The aim of this study was to test the idea that embodied narratives might affect outcomes in hearing aid fitting. This was achieved by carrying out experiments in which technical (acoustic) differences between alternative hearing aid fittings were absent, while providing test subjects with a strong contrast between the processes apparently applied to derive the fittings being compared. Thus, any effects of contrasting narratives could be observed, free of acoustical confounds. The hypothesis was that narrative effects would be observed. Design: A balanced crossover design was used, in which subjects received and evaluated two bilateral hearing aid fittings in succession. Subjects were deceived as to the true identical content of the hearing aid fittings being compared, but encouraged to believe that one fitting process was interactive and the other was diagnostic in character. Two almost identical experiments were undertaken: one with 24 experienced adult hearing aid users and another with 16 adult first-time users. Each hearing aid fitting was worn at home for 2 weeks, after which self-report outcome measures (Hearing Aid Performance Questionnaire, Hearing Handicap Inventory for the Elderly, and International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids) were administered. After the second test period, a short preference questionnaire was also completed. Results: Twenty of the 24 experienced users showed a clear preference for one or the other fitting, and their self-report scores reflected these preferences. Effect sizes were comparable with those typically observed for true acoustical contrasts. No order effect was seen in this group. In contrast, 13 of the 16 first-time users preferred the second fitting. Trends in the self-report measures were similar for this group but weaker than for the experienced users. In both groups, the reasons given for subjects preference were predominantly related to sound, despite there being no acoustical differences. Conclusions: This study suggests that the narrative embodied in a given fitting process can have a substantial effect on the perceived benefit of the treatment, independent of any acoustical differences, at least for experienced users. For first-time users, acclimatization seems to overshadow the purely narrative effect of any fitting process. In the future, research study designs should include steps to avoid narrative effects when technical parameters of hearing aids are the intended object of study. In clinical practice, the narrative is part of the therapeutic context, and one may design it for maximum beneficial effect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2015
Keywords
Hearing aid fitting; Placebo effect
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122062 (URN)10.1097/AUD.0000000000000157 (DOI)000360630900003 ()25811932 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Oticon A/S, Denmark

Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-10-19 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Öberg, M. (2015). Hearing Care for Older Adults: Beyond the Audiology Clinic. American Journal of Audiology, 24(2), 104-107
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hearing Care for Older Adults: Beyond the Audiology Clinic
2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 104-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to highlight the importance of hearing health care beyond the clinic for older people with impaired hearing. Method: This article emphasizes factors affecting the success of audiologic rehabilitation for older people and describes practical clinical and community-based strategies for promoting successful hearing health care. Results: Older people are not always aware of the extent of their hearing loss, may not always expect to benefit from using a hearing aid, and often have low self-efficacy for managing to learn to use hearing aids. Increased knowledge and support from other health professionals, family caregivers, and significant others could optimize older peoples participation in everyday activities. Conclusion: Further work is needed to develop new interventions for older people with impaired hearing and to increase collaboration with general practitioners as well as other health care professionals.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2015
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120657 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0077 (DOI)000358354700009 ()25856775 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Oticon Foundation Oticon A/S; Swedish Institute of Assistive Technology [2007/0240]; Swedish Hard of Hearing Association [B2009/02]

Available from: 2015-08-20 Created: 2015-08-20 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Sundewall Thoren, E., Öberg, M., Andersson, G. & Lunner, T. (2015). Internet Interventions for Hearing Loss. American Journal of Audiology, 24(3), 316-319
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet Interventions for Hearing Loss
2015 (English)In: American Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1059-0889, E-ISSN 1558-9137, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 316-319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of the two studies presented in this research forum article was to develop audiological rehabilitation programs for experienced hearing aid users and evaluate them in online versions. In this research forum article, the differences between the two studies are discussed. Method: Two randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were performed evaluating the efficacy of online rehabilitation, including professional guidance by an audiologist. In each RCT, the effects of the online programs were compared with the effects measured in a control group. Results: The results from the first RCT showed a significant increase in activity and participation for both groups with participants in the intervention group improving more than those in the control group. At the 6-month follow-up, after the study, the significant increase was maintained; however, amounts of increase in the two groups were no longer significantly different. The results from the second RCT showed significant increase in activity and participation for the intervention group, although the control group did not improve. Conclusions: The results from the RCTs provide evidence that the Internet can be used to deliver rehabilitation to hearing-aid users and that their problems are reduced by the intervention; however, the content of the online rehabilitation program requires further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 2015
National Category
Applied Psychology Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123083 (URN)10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0009 (DOI)000364315200012 ()26649538 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Oticon Foundation; Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE); Swedish Hard of Hearing Association (HRF)

Available from: 2015-12-03 Created: 2015-12-03 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Öberg, M., Elisabet, S. T., Hagejärd, L. & Teodorescu, I. (2015). Online Individualized Active Communication Education- a Swedish pilot study. In: : . Paper presented at 2nd International Meeting of Internet and Audiology, Eriksholm Research Centre, Marienlyst Hotel Eriksholm, Denmark, September 24-25 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Online Individualized Active Communication Education- a Swedish pilot study
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Internet, Audiology
National Category
Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124042 (URN)
Conference
2nd International Meeting of Internet and Audiology, Eriksholm Research Centre, Marienlyst Hotel Eriksholm, Denmark, September 24-25 2015
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2019-01-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8743-1636

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