liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Kindström, Daniel
Publications (10 of 68) Show all publications
Kindström, D., Ottosson, M. & Carlborg, P. (2018). Unraveling firm-level activities for shaping markets. Industrial Marketing Management, 68, 36-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unraveling firm-level activities for shaping markets
2018 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 68, p. 36-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As the marketing literature increasingly construes markets as malleable entities, research studies of ‘marketshaping’strategies have gained increasing attention in recent years. Those are proactive, deliberate initiativeswhich a firm takes with the aim of re-shaping an operating environment comprising direct customers, customers'customers, and other actors such as its competitors. Our study derives a theoretical framework for marketshapingfrom the existing literature and an in-depth case study of one market-leading firm in the steel industry,which has been working actively in the shaping of a market. Analysis of the responses of a range of experiencedexecutive staff to unstructured and semi-structured interviews shows, among other things, that in order to shapethe market, the firm performed many individual and aggregated activities at three levels of influence – system,market offer and technology – with various actors in the market in focus. These findings are the basis of aproposed activity framework for the proactive shaping of a market: that is, what firms can do in order to shapean existing market, drive growth and create sustainable competitive advantage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Market shaping, Market strategy, Market innovation, Practice, Case study
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143227 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2017.09.003 (DOI)000424310200004 ()2-s2.0-85029586626 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Custoval
Available from: 2017-11-27 Created: 2017-11-27 Last updated: 2018-03-02Bibliographically approved
Ottosson, M. & Kindström, D. (2016). Exploring Proactive Niche Market Strategies in the Steel Industry: Activities and Implications. Industrial Marketing Management, 55(2016), 119-130
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring Proactive Niche Market Strategies in the Steel Industry: Activities and Implications
2016 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 55, no 2016, p. 119-130Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The literature has often proposed a niche market strategy as the means by which producers of commodity-based products (e.g. steel, pulp and paper, and petrochemicals) can counter increasing competition, particularly from low-cost, low-price competitors. That strategy has primarily been viewed as defensive, i.e. the weaker producer builds protective barriers around its product to fend off competition. This paper proposes, on the contrary, that niche marketing can also be used as a proactive, or even aggressive, strategy to enable a firm to outperform competitors in both profitability and growth. The use of a proactive niche market strategy in practice is examined in case studies of three global Swedish steel firms that have achieved above-average profitability over time. We propose, as a result of our analysis, the concept of the proactive niche market strategy as one that employs a mix of five key activities: focusing on the customers' customers; making the effort to become a preferred supplier early in the process; interacting with customers at multiple levels; extending the product offering by adding services; and focusing on the development of “adjacent” products, markets, and applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Niche marketing, Proactive niche market strategy, Activities, Steel industry, Case studies
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128102 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2015.08.003 (DOI)000377317800012 ()
Projects
CustoVal - ”World-class customer value”
Funder
VINNOVA
Note

Funding agencies;The authors are indebted to three anonymous reviewers for insightful comments and to Keith Crosier for his patient and invaluable editing services. Finally, the authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (Vinnova).

Available from: 2016-05-17 Created: 2016-05-17 Last updated: 2017-05-19
Kindström, D. & Ottosson, M. (2016). Identifying enabling mechanisms for the implementation of market orientation. In: Extending Value Through Product, Service and Platform Innovations: . Paper presented at 2016 CBIM Academic Workshop (Bilbao) June 29, 30 and July 1, 2016 · Bilbao (Spain) (pp. 1-27).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying enabling mechanisms for the implementation of market orientation
2016 (English)In: Extending Value Through Product, Service and Platform Innovations, 2016, p. 1-27Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A focus on market orientation in order to improve firm performance has during the last decades been both well, and widely, accepted as a necessity for remaining competitive. Even though the concept has been the focus of much research, recent studies suggest that practitioners find it difficult to interpret the market orientation concept and, subsequently, find it hard to implement in their organizations. The actual implementation of market orientation is also a relatively unexplored area within marketing. The majority of research around market orientation has instead tended to focus on other issues such as to measure and link performance to the development of the actual concept rather than implementation aspects and processes.This article identifies four enabling mechanisms for the implementation of market orientation. It forwards a framework to advance understanding of the actual implementation and effects of market orientation. The framework – consisting of issues focusing on effects on an internal, a customer, and a market level – aims to increase the understanding of how a successful implementation of market orientation can be achieved.Findings are developed through an in-depth longitudinal case study of a B2B firm implementing market orientation. As such, the findings are well grounded in, and provide insights into, managers’ real challenges, as well as offering opportunities to generate new insights for academia. By studying the market orientation implementation process, four mechanisms that enable the implementation is, among other things, identified; 1) Top management as a change champion, 2) A coordinating ICT platform, 3) The redesign of the offering structure (portfolio), and 4) A multi-layered organizational structure.

Keywords
Market orientation, Implementation, B2B, Mechanisms, Case study
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140763 (URN)
Conference
2016 CBIM Academic Workshop (Bilbao) June 29, 30 and July 1, 2016 · Bilbao (Spain)
Projects
Custoval
Funder
VINNOVA
Available from: 2017-09-12 Created: 2017-09-12 Last updated: 2017-09-21Bibliographically approved
Kindström, D. & Ottosson, M. (2016). Local and regional energy companies offering energy services: Key activities and implications for the business model. Applied Energy, 171, 491-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local and regional energy companies offering energy services: Key activities and implications for the business model
2016 (English)In: Applied Energy, ISSN 0306-2619, E-ISSN 1872-9118, Vol. 171, p. 491-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Energy services play a key role in increasing energy efficiency in the industry. The key actors in these services are the local and regional energy companies that are increasingly implementing energy services as part of their market offering and developing service portfolios. Although expectations for energy services have been high, progress has so far been limited, and many companies offering energy services, including energy companies, are experiencing difficulties in implementing energy services and providing them to the market. Overall, this research examines what is needed for local and regional energy companies to successfully implement energy services (and consequently provide them to the market). In doing this, a two-stage process is used: first, we identify key activities for the successful implementation of energy services, and second, we aggregate the findings to the business model level. This research demonstrates that to succeed in implementing energy services, an energy company may need to renew parts or all of its existing product-based business model, formulate a new business model, or develop coexisting multiple business models. By discussing two distinct business model innovation processes, this research demonstrates that there can be different paths to success.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Energy service; ESCo; Activities; Energy efficiency; Business model; Business model innovation
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-127223 (URN)10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.03.092 (DOI)000375515500042 ()
Projects
Energitjänster i energibolag – ett ökat värdeskapande med kunden i fokus
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 37887-1
Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Kowalkowski, C., Kindström, D. & Carlborg, P. (2016). Triadic value propositions: When it takes more than two for tango. Service Science, 8(3), 282-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Triadic value propositions: When it takes more than two for tango
2016 (English)In: Service Science, ISSN 2164-3962, E-ISSN 2164-3970, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 282-299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Value propositions are reciprocal resource-integration promises and value alignment mechanisms, operating to and from actors seeking an equitable exchange. In a business triad any change between two of the actors will also affect the relationships with the third actor, thus influencing resource integration and value creation on a value constellation level. The objective of this paper is to conceptualize a triadic value proposition and analyze how service innovation changes the structural, economic, and social ties between the actors in the triad. Through a qualitative empirical enquiry, we study a six-year process in which a multinational industry incumbent enters the service business. Data comes primarily from interviews with respondents from the manufacturer, dealers, and users. As the value proposition evolves over time, the network ties and thus the interdependence between manufacturer, dealer, and user are strengthened. The findings provide firms a better understand of how to involve and collaborate with key actors in order to initiate a discontinuous change on a firm and network level. This is particularly timely given the major difficulties product firms face when intermediaries play a decisive role for the success of their service innovation initiatives.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), 2016
Keywords
Value proposition; network ties; relationship development; service innovation; longitudinal research
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117961 (URN)10.1287/serv.2016.0145 (DOI)000390566500004 ()
Note

Previous status of this article was Manuscript.

Available from: 2015-05-19 Created: 2015-05-19 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Kindström, D., Kowalkowski, C. & Brashear Alejandro, T. (2015). Adding services to product-based portfolios: Adding services to product-based portfolios: An exploration of the implications for the sales function. Journal of Service Management, 26(3), 372-393
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adding services to product-based portfolios: Adding services to product-based portfolios: An exploration of the implications for the sales function
2015 (English)In: Journal of Service Management, ISSN 1757-5818, E-ISSN 1757-5826, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 372-393Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The objective of this research is to explore the implications for the sales function of the infusion of services by formerly product-based firms. In particular, it aims at identifying the changes that need to be made at the sales-function level if the services are to be successfully sold.Design/Methodology: This research is an exploratory qualitative case study. Data were collected by focus group discussions and in-depth interviews with relevant managers in three large multinational companies based in Northern Europe, which were pursuing service-led growth. Findings: The effects of service infusion processes on the sales function could be seen with respect to the three parts of the analytical framework: organization, roles, and competences. The results illustrate the need for a changed perspective with respect to all three parts, if a product-based firm is to be successful in the infusing of associated services into its portfolio of offerings. Analysis of the results identifies key operational initiatives that management needs to understand and implement when corporate and marketing strategies increasingly focus on service-led growth.Research limitations:The study was exploratory and vendor centric, which means that it did not quantitatively assess the results or directly involve the customers at whom the services were directed. Also, the choice of business-to-business firms limits the capacity to generalize the findings. Originality/Value:Whereas relationship-based and value-based selling are approaches more geared to the sales-force level, the study reported in this paper set out to understand fundamental differences at the sales-function level when firms pursue service-led growth. The findings suggest that the realignment of corporate strategy towards an increased focus on services may have far-reaching implications for the sales function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015
Keywords
service selling, service infusion, sales function, organization, roles, competences
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-119662 (URN)10.1108/JOSM-02-2014-0042 (DOI)000357114500002 ()
Available from: 2015-06-23 Created: 2015-06-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Kindström, D. & Kowalkowski, C. (2015). Service Driven Business Model Innovation: Organizing the Shift from a Product-based to a Service-centric Business Model (1ed.). In: Nicolai Foss, Tina Saebi (Ed.), Business Model Innovation: The Organizational Dimension (pp. 191-216). Oxford University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Service Driven Business Model Innovation: Organizing the Shift from a Product-based to a Service-centric Business Model
2015 (English)In: Business Model Innovation: The Organizational Dimension / [ed] Nicolai Foss, Tina Saebi, Oxford University Press, 2015, 1, p. 191-216Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]
  • Features contributions by leading international authors on the topics of business model and business model innovation
  • The first sustained and focused inquiry into the organizational dimension of business model innovation
  • Covers areas of business strategy, innovation and organizational change

Business model innovation is an important source of competitive advantage and corporate renewal. An increasing number of companies have to innovate their business models, not just because of competitive forces but also because of the ongoing change from product-based to service-based business models. Yet, business model innovation also involves organizational change process that challenges existing processes, structures and modes of control.This volume features thirteen chapters written by authorities on business model innovation. The specific angle, and the novel feature of this book, is to thoroughly examine the organizational dimension of business model innovation. Drawing on organizational theory and empirical observation, the contributors specifically highlight organizational design aspects of business model innovation, focusing on how reward systems, power distributions, routines and standard operating procedures, the allocation of authority, and other aspects of organizational structure and control should be designed to support the business model the firm chooses. Also discussed is how existing organizational structures, capabilities, beliefs, cultures and so on influence the firm's ability to flexibly change to new business models.

Readership: Researchers and academics in business and management interested in business strategy, innovation and organizational change; Practitioners, consultants and executives involved with implementation of new business models

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2015 Edition: 1
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114550 (URN)978-0-19-870187-3 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-02-26 Created: 2015-02-26 Last updated: 2015-03-11
Kowalkowski, C., Windahl, C., Kindström, D. & Gebauer, H. (2015). What service transition?: Rethinking established assumptions about manufacturers’ service-led growth strategies. Industrial Marketing Management, 45, 59-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What service transition?: Rethinking established assumptions about manufacturers’ service-led growth strategies
2015 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 45, p. 59-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both academics and practitioners emphasize the importance for product firms of implementing service-led growth strategies. The service transition concept is well established, namely a unidirectional repositioning along a product-service continuum—from basic, product-oriented services towards more customized, process-oriented ones—ultimately leading to the provision of solutions. We challenge this service transition assumption and develop alternative ones regarding how product firms should pursue service-led growth. Using ‘problematization methodology’, and drawing on findings from thirteen system suppliers, we identify three service-led growth trajectories: (1) becoming an availability provider, which is the focus of most transition literature; (2) becoming a performance provider, which resembles project-based sales and implies an even greater differentiation of what customers are offered; and, (3) becoming an ‘industrializer’, which is about standardizing previously customized solutions to promote repeatability and scalability. Based on our critical inquiry, we develop two alternative assumptions: (a) firms need to constantly balance business expansion and standardization activities; and (b) manage the co-existence of different system supplier roles. Finally, we consider the implications for implementing service-led growth strategies of the alternative assumptions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Service transition; Solutions; Manufacturing companies; Service strategy; Problematization methodology
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117411 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2015.02.016 (DOI)000353088700008 ()
Available from: 2015-04-25 Created: 2015-04-25 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Kindström, D. & Kowalkowski, C. (2014). Editorial: Service innovation in business-­‐to-­‐business firms. The journal of business & industrial marketing, 29(2), 93-95
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Editorial: Service innovation in business-­‐to-­‐business firms
2014 (English)In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 93-95Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-106051 (URN)10.1108/JBIM-08-2013-0166 (DOI)000331486800001 ()
Available from: 2014-04-22 Created: 2014-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Kindström, D. & Kowalkowski, C. (2014). Service innovation in product-centric firms: a multidimensional business model perspective. The journal of business & industrial marketing, 29(2), 96-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Service innovation in product-centric firms: a multidimensional business model perspective
2014 (English)In: The journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 96-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose – This article aims to investigate the nature and characteristics of business model elements required for successful service innovation. The authors examine which unique resources and capabilities product-centric firms should develop and deploy to pursue service innovation.

Design/methodology/approach – Data collected from several research projects support iterations across empirical data and theory, in an abductive process. Empirical data come from product-centric firms; interviews and focus groups were the main data collection methods.

Findings – Specific resources and capabilities are needed for the proposed business model elements, as defined by the overarching strategy and structure. Firms can approach the process of service innovation from different starting points and sequences, depending on the context.

Research limitations/implications – Because it takes a synthesizing approach, this research lacks some detail. By taking a business model approach with a holistic perspective, it forgoes detailed descriptions to provide greater breadth.

Practical implications – Managers can use business models as tools to visualize changes, which should increase internal transparency, understanding, and awareness of service opportunities and necessary changes. Dependencies exist among elements; a change in one element likely affects the others. This study provides insights into which efforts are necessary and offers managers a guiding framework.

Originality/value – By providing a multidimensional perspective on service innovation, this study merges various previous research into a synthesized discussion. Combining a resources and capabilities perspective with a business model framework also leads to new insights regarding service innovation and associated activities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014
Keywords
Business model; Service innovation; Capabilities; Servitization; Product-centric firms; Service infusion
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105425 (URN)10.1108/JBIM-08-2013-0165 (DOI)000331486800002 ()
Available from: 2014-03-21 Created: 2014-03-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications