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Filippini, Daniel
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Publications (10 of 109) Show all publications
Khaldi, A., Falk, D., Bengtsson, K., Maziz, A., Filippini, D., Robinson, N. D. & Jager, E. W. H. (2018). Patterning highly conducting conjugated polymer electrodes for soft and flexible microelectrochemical devices. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 10(17), 14978-14985
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patterning highly conducting conjugated polymer electrodes for soft and flexible microelectrochemical devices
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2018 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 10, no 17, p. 14978-14985Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is a need for soft actuators in various biomedical applications in order to manipulate delicate objects such as cells and tissues. Soft actuators are able to adapt to any shape and limit the stress applied to delicate objects. Conjugated polymer actuators, especially in the so-called trilayer configuration, are interesting candidates for driving such micromanipulators. However, challenges involved in patterning the electrodes in a trilayer with individual contact have prevented further development of soft micromanipulators based on conjugated polymer actuators. To allow such patterning, two printing-based patterning techniques have been developed. First an oxidant layer is printed using either syringe-based printing or micro-contact printing, followed by vapor phase polymerization of the conjugated polymer. Sub-millimeter patterns with electronic conductivities of 800 Scm-1 are obtained. Next, laser ablation is used to cleanly cut the final device structures including the printed patterns, resulting in fingers with individually controllable digits and miniaturized hands. The methods presented in this paper will enable integration of patterned electrically active conjugated polymer layers in many types of complex 3-D structures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2018
Keywords
Vapor phase polymerization, Printing, soft Lithography, Conjugated Polymers actuators, patterning, microfabrication
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-146132 (URN)10.1021/acsami.8b01059 (DOI)000431723400081 ()29557639 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:This study was financially supported by Linköping University, COST Action MP1003 ESNAM (European Scientific Network for Artificial Muscles), the Swedish Research Council (VR – 2010-6672, 2014-3079, 2015-03298), the Knut & Alice Wallenberg Stiftelse (LiU-2010-00318 & LiU-2012- 01361), and the EU FP7 Marie Curie action IEF (625923 POLYACT)

Available from: 2018-03-28 Created: 2018-03-28 Last updated: 2018-05-30Bibliographically approved
Comina, G., Suska, A. & Filippini, D. (2016). Towards autonomous lab-on-a-chip devices for cell phone biosensing. Biosensors & bioelectronics, 77, 1153-1167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards autonomous lab-on-a-chip devices for cell phone biosensing
2016 (English)In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 77, p. 1153-1167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Modern cell phones are a ubiquitous resource with a residual capacity to accommodate chemical sensing and biosensing capabilities. From the different approaches explored to capitalize on such resource, the use of autonomous disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices conceived as only accessories to complement cell phones underscores the possibility to entirely retain cell phones ubiquity for distributed biosensing. The technology and principles exploited for autonomous LOC devices are here selected and reviewed focusing on their potential to serve cell phone readout configurations. Together with this requirement, the central aspects of cell phones resources that determine their potential for analytical detection are examined. The conversion of these LOC concepts into universal architectures that are readable on unaccessorized phones is discussed within this context. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Autonomous lab-on-a-chip; Cell phone biosensing; Point-of-care
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124074 (URN)10.1016/j.bios.2015.10.092 (DOI)000366766900161 ()26569446 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (VR) [C0453801]; Carl Tryggers Foundation [CTS14140]

Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Comina, G., Suska, A. & Filippini, D. (2015). 3D Printed Unibody Lab-on-a-Chip: Features Survey and Check-Valves Integration dagger. Micromachines, 6(4), 437-451
Open this publication in new window or tab >>3D Printed Unibody Lab-on-a-Chip: Features Survey and Check-Valves Integration dagger
2015 (English)In: Micromachines, ISSN 2072-666X, E-ISSN 2072-666X, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 437-451Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The unibody lab-on-a-chip (ULOC) concept entails a fast and affordable micro-prototyping system built around a single monolithic 3D printed element (unibody). A consumer-grade stereo lithography (SL) 3D printer can configure ULOCs with different forms of sample delivery, transport, handling and readout, while minimizing material costs and fabrication time. ULOC centralizes all complex fabrication procedures and replaces the need for clean room resources, delivering prototypes for less than 1 US$, which can be printed in 10 min and ready for testing in less than 30 min. Recent examples of ULOC integration of transport, chemical sensing for optical readout and flow mixing capabilities are discussed, as well as the integration of the first check-valves for ULOC devices. ULOC valves are strictly unidirectional up to 100 psi, show an exponential forward flow behavior up to 70 psi and can be entirely fabricated with the ULOC approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2015
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118257 (URN)10.3390/mi6040437 (DOI)000353777200003 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsradet); Carl Tryggers Foundation

Available from: 2015-05-22 Created: 2015-05-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Comina, G., Suska, A. & Filippini, D. (2015). Autonomous Chemical Sensing Interface for Universal Cell Phone Readout. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 54(30), 8708-8712
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autonomous Chemical Sensing Interface for Universal Cell Phone Readout
2015 (English)In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 54, no 30, p. 8708-8712Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Exploiting the ubiquity of cell phones for quantitative chemical sensing imposes strong demands on interfacing devices. They should be autonomous, disposable, and integrate all necessary calibration and actuation elements. In addition, a single design should couple universally to a variety of cell phones, and operate in their default configuration. Here, we demonstrate such a concept and its implementation as a quantitative glucose meter that integrates finger pumps, unidirectional valves, calibration references, and focusing optics on a disposable device configured for universal video acquisition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2015
Keywords
3D printed fluidics; analytical methods; autonomous lab-on-a-chip; cell phone readout; sensors
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120447 (URN)10.1002/anie.201503727 (DOI)000358051600022 ()26095136 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (VR); Carl Tryggers Foundation

Available from: 2015-08-12 Created: 2015-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Preechaburana, P., Suska, A. & Filippini, D. (2014). Biosensing with cell phones. Trends in Biotechnology, 32(7), 351-355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biosensing with cell phones
2014 (English)In: Trends in Biotechnology, ISSN 0167-7799, E-ISSN 1879-3096, Vol. 32, no 7, p. 351-355Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Continued progress in cell-phone devices has made them powerful mobile computers, equipped with sophisticated, permanent physical sensors embedded as the default configuration. By contrast, the incorporation of permanent biosensors in cell-phone units has been prevented by the multivocal nature of the stimuli and the reactions involved in biosensing and chemical sensing. Biosensing with cell phones entails the complementation of biosensing devices with the physical sensors and communication and processing capabilities of modern cell phones. Biosensing, chemical-sensing, environmental-sensing, and diagnostic capabilities would thus be supported and run on the residual capacity of existing cell-phone infrastructure. The technologies necessary to materialize such a scenario have emerged in different fields and applications. This article addresses the progress on cell-phone biosensing, the specific compromises, and the blend of technologies required to craft biosensing on cell phones.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
cell phones; biosensing; optical sensing; lab-on-a-chip; point-of-care; diagnostics
National Category
Medical Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109255 (URN)10.1016/j.tibtech.2014.03.007 (DOI)000338411300003 ()24702730 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-12 Created: 2014-08-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Comina, G., Suska, A. & Filippini, D. (2014). Low cost lab-on-a-chip prototyping with a consumer grade 3D printer. Lab on a Chip, 14(16), 2978-2982
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low cost lab-on-a-chip prototyping with a consumer grade 3D printer
2014 (English)In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 14, no 16, p. 2978-2982Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Versatile prototyping of 3D printed lab-on-a-chip devices, supporting different forms of sample delivery, transport, functionalization and readout, is demonstrated with a consumer grade printer, which centralizes all critical fabrication tasks. Devices cost 0.57US$ and are demonstrated in chemical sensing and micromixing examples, which exploit established principles from reference technologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2014
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109578 (URN)10.1039/c4lc00394b (DOI)000339470400012 ()24931176 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-21 Created: 2014-08-21 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Comina, G., Suska, A. & Filippini, D. (2014). PDMS lab-on-a-chip fabrication using 3D printed templates. Lab on a Chip, 14(2), 424-430
Open this publication in new window or tab >>PDMS lab-on-a-chip fabrication using 3D printed templates
2014 (English)In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 424-430Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The fabrication of conventional PDMS on glass lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices, using templates printed with a commercial (2299 US$) micro-stereo lithography 3D printer, is demonstrated. Printed templates replace clean room and photolithographic fabrication resources and deliver resolutions of 50 mu m, and up to 10 mu m in localized hindrances, whereas the templates are smooth enough to allow direct transfer and proper sealing to glass substrates. 3D printed templates accommodate multiple thicknesses, from 50 mu m up to several mm within the same template, with no additional processing cost or effort. This capability is exploited to integrate silicone tubing easily, to improve micromixer performance and to produce multilevel fluidics with simple access to independent functional surfaces, which is illustrated by time-resolved glucose detection. The templates are reusable, can be fabricated in under 20 min, with an average cost of 0.48 US$, which promotes broader access to established LOC configurations with minimal fabrication requirements, relieves LOC fabrication from design skills and provides a versatile LOC development platform.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Royal Society of Chemistry, 2014
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103283 (URN)10.1039/c3lc50956g (DOI)000328910700019 ()
Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Dini, F., Filippini, D., Paolesse, R., Lundström, I. & Di Natale, C. (2013). Computer screen assisted digital photography. Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, 179(SI), 46-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer screen assisted digital photography
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2013 (English)In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 179, no SI, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The computer screen photo-assisted techniques (CSPT) have been developed during the last 10 years through an extensive collaboration between University of Rome "Tor Vergata" and Linkoping University in Sweden. CSPT has thus evolved into a concept we now call computer screen assisted digital photography, yielding detailed information about the interaction between color indicators and (volatile) analytes. In the present paper, we give a brief summary of the CSPT concept and its connection to digital photography. We concentrate, however, on the most recent results, which were obtained by using most of the degrees of freedom offered by a computer screen as a light source and a digital (web) camera as a detector. Thus, we describe in detail recent experiments on cotton yarns impregnated with color indicators for volatile organic molecules. The interaction between the color indicators and molecules, like trimethylamine, was investigated by CSPT in high dynamic imaging together with a background noise limiting algorithm. It is shown that the simultaneous use of the last two additions to the CSPT concept considerably enhances the chemical sensing ability of CSPT. It is concluded that the collaboration between Rome and Linkoping has generated a useful platform for further developments of chemical analysis with a ubiquitous instrumentation, a (computer) screen and a web camera. This technique is aimed at facilitating the assembly of opto-chemical sensors with evident benefits in the reduction of cost of sensor systems and in an increased integrability with the existent telecommunication infrastructures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
CSPT, Digital photography, High dynamic range imaging, Background noise elimination, Cotton threads, Volatile compounds
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-91540 (URN)10.1016/j.snb.2012.10.092 (DOI)000316588100005 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council (VR)||Swedish Agency for Innovation Research (VINNOVA)||

Available from: 2013-04-26 Created: 2013-04-26 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Dini, F., Martinelli, E., Paolesse, R., Filippini, D., Schild, D., Lundström, I. & Di Natale, C. (2012). Data processing for image-based chemical sensors: unsupervised region of interest selection and background noise compensation. Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 402(2), 823-832
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Data processing for image-based chemical sensors: unsupervised region of interest selection and background noise compensation
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2012 (English)In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 402, no 2, p. 823-832Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Natural olfaction suggests that numerous replicas of small sensors can achieve large sensitivity. This concept of sensor redundancy can be exploited by use of optical chemical sensors whose use of image sensors enables the simultaneous measurement of several spatially distributed indicators. Digital image sensors split the framed scene into hundreds of thousands of pixels each corresponding to a portion of the sensing layer. The signal from each pixel can be regarded as an independent sensor, which leads to a highly redundant sensor array. Such redundancy can eventually be exploited to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper we report an algorithm for reduction of the noise of pixel signals. For this purpose, the algorithm processes the output of groups of pixels whose signals share the same time behavior, as is the case for signals related to the same indicator. To define these groups of pixels, unsupervised clustering, based on classification of the indicator colors, is proposed here. This approach to signal processing is tested in experiments on the chemical sensitivity of replicas of eight indicators spotted on to a plastic substrate. Results show that the groups of pixels can be defined independently of the geometrical arrangement of the sensing spots, and substantial improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio is obtained, enabling the detection of volatile compounds at any location on the distributed sensing layer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag (Germany), 2012
Keywords
Optical sensors, Chemical sensors, Chemometrics/Statistics
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74851 (URN)10.1007/s00216-011-5521-2 (DOI)000298645300025 ()
Available from: 2012-02-10 Created: 2012-02-10 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Preechaburana, P., Erlandsson, P., Åström, E., Påhlsson, P., Filippini, D. & Robinson, N. D. (2012). Disposable total internal reflection fluorescence lab-on-a-chip for medical diagnosis.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disposable total internal reflection fluorescence lab-on-a-chip for medical diagnosis
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2012 (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Lab-on-a-chip detection of fluorescence transduced chemical stimuli is demonstrated using fluidics and optical coupling disposable elements in a configuration compatible with distributed diagnosis.

Disposable optical elements are designed to separate excitation by total internal reflection using regular glass slides as optical light guide and fluidics support, while high dynamic range image acquisition with consumer cameras complement the platform to support a broad range of responses with a same configuration. Complementary tone mapping procedures are introduced to systematically double the sensitivity for selected range intervals.

Chemical sensitization to free fucose, a diagnostic marker for liver cirrhosis and several cancer forms, illustrates the platform capabilities for diagnosis targets.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86181 (URN)
Available from: 2012-12-10 Created: 2012-12-10 Last updated: 2015-06-01Bibliographically approved
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