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Samuelsson, J., Thunberg, G., Åsberg Johnels, J., Palmqvist, L., Heimann, M., Reichenberg, M., . . . Holmer, E. (2024). The potential impact of literacy intervention on speech soundproduction in students with intellectual disability andcommunication difficulties. Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The potential impact of literacy intervention on speech soundproduction in students with intellectual disability andcommunication difficulties
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2024 (English)In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A small body of research and reports from educational and clinicalpractice suggest that teaching literacy skills may facilitate the devel-opment of speech sound production in students with intellectualdisabilities (ID). However, intervention research is needed to test thepotential connection. This study aimed to investigate whether twelveweeks of systematic, digital literacy intervention enhanced speechsound production in students with ID and communication difficulties.A sample of 121 students with ID were assigned to four differentgroups: phonics-based, comprehension-based, a combination withboth phonics- and comprehension-based intervention anda comparison group with teaching-as-usual. Speech sound productionwas assessed before and after the intervention. The results on the datawithout the imputed variable suggested a significant positive effect ofsystematic, digital literacy interventions on speech sound production.However, results from sensitivity analyses with imputed missing datawas more ambiguous, with the effect only approaching significance(ps = .05–.07) for one of the interventions. Nonetheless, we tentativelysuggest that systematic, digital literacy intervention could supportspeech development in students with ID and communication difficul-ties. Future research should be done to confirm and further elucidatethe functional mechanisms of this link, so that we may have a betterunderstanding and can improve instruction and the pivotal abilities ofspeech and reading.

National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-205840 (URN)10.1080/02699206.2024.2374915 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-04702Wallenberg Foundations, 2018-0084Stiftelsen Sävstaholm, 2023-006Linnéa och Josef Carlssons stiftelse
Available from: 2024-07-05 Created: 2024-07-05 Last updated: 2024-07-05
Strid, K. & Heimann, M. (2023). Attention: a prerequisite for learning (4ed.). In: Tierney, Robert J; Rizvi, Fazal; Ercikan, Kadriye (Ed.), International Encyclopedia of Education (Fourth Edition): (pp. 117-126). Amsterdam: Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attention: a prerequisite for learning
2023 (English)In: International Encyclopedia of Education (Fourth Edition) / [ed] Tierney, Robert J; Rizvi, Fazal; Ercikan, Kadriye, Amsterdam: Elsevier , 2023, 4, p. 117-126Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter is organized into four parts. 1. Attention in infancy; 2. Attention networks, behavioral and brain aspects plus subsections on developmental disorders and how genes influence attention; 3. Aspects of attention such as novelty, memory or pupil dilation; and 4. Attention and learning which includes a comprehensive model of attention in infancy plus sections on how attention is important for learning from social interactions and for understanding intentions. The chapter ends with two brief sections, one on digital media and one on compensatory systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: Elsevier, 2023 Edition: 4
Keywords
Attention, Alerting network, Development, Digital media, Effortful control, Executive network, Face processing, Joint attention, Orienting network, Pupil dilation
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Information Systems, Social aspects
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-203809 (URN)10.1016/B978-0-12-818630-5.14015-1 (DOI)2-s2.0-85150562644 (Scopus ID)9780128186299 (ISBN)
Available from: 2024-05-27 Created: 2024-05-27 Last updated: 2024-05-28Bibliographically approved
Palmqvist, L., Reichenberg, M., Samuelsson, J., Holmer, E., Lundälv, M., Thunberg, G. & Heimann, M. (2023). Kan en app-baserad läsintervention öka elevers läsförmåga och lärares self-efficacy?. Läs- och Skrivsvårigheter & Dyslexi
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kan en app-baserad läsintervention öka elevers läsförmåga och lärares self-efficacy?
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2023 (Swedish)In: Läs- och Skrivsvårigheter & DyslexiArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-202448 (URN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-04702Wallenberg Foundations, 2018.0084
Available from: 2024-04-12 Created: 2024-04-12 Last updated: 2024-04-16
Samuelsson, J., Holmer, E., Åsberg Johnels, J., Palmqvist, L., Heimann, M., Reichenberg, M. & Thunberg, G. (2023). My point of view: Students with intellectual and communicative disabilities express their views on speech and reading using Talking Mats. British Journal of Learning Disabilities
Open this publication in new window or tab >>My point of view: Students with intellectual and communicative disabilities express their views on speech and reading using Talking Mats
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2023 (English)In: British Journal of Learning Disabilities, ISSN 1354-4187, E-ISSN 1468-3156Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background It can be challenging for people with intellectual disabilities to convey their thoughts and opinions because of cognitive, speech and language impairments. Consequently, facilitating their ability to communicate using augmentative and alternative communication methods is essential. The picture-based framework Talking Mats has been applied in many studies and has been shown to be successful in facilitating communication and soliciting views from individuals with intellectual disabilities and communication difficulties. The aim of this study was to describe the views of students with intellectual disabilities and communication difficulties on speech and reading activities and to examine whether valence scores (from negative to positive) on these views were associated with performance on tests of their corresponding abilities. Methods This is a cross-sectional quantitative survey study. A group of 111 students with intellectual disabilities and communication difficulties aged 7–21 were interviewed about their speech and reading activities using the visual framework Talking Mats. Their answers were scored on a three-grade like-dislike continuum and were correlated with their results on adapted tests of the corresponding abilities. Findings The students expressed their views on speech and reading activities. The scored views on speech were positively associated with speech production, and the scored views on reading activities were positively related to reading ability. This suggests that their opinions as expressed through Talking Mats were consistent and reliable. Conclusions Most students with intellectual disabilities and communicative difficulties can reliably express their own opinions of their abilities when they are provided with a clear visual structure and pictorial support, such as Talking Mats. In this study, this was seen for students with a mild intellectual disability from age seven and onwards and for students with a more severe intellectual disability from 12 years of age and onwards.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2023
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-195752 (URN)10.1111/bld.12543 (DOI)001012998200001 ()2-s2.0-85162645386 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, 2018.0084Swedish Research Council, 2018-04702
Note

Funding: Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation [2018.0084]; Swedish Research Council [2018-04702]

Available from: 2023-06-26 Created: 2023-06-26 Last updated: 2023-11-30Bibliographically approved
Reichenberg, M., Thunberg, G., Holmer, E., Palmqvist, L., Samuelsson, J., Lundälv, M., . . . Heimann, M. (2023). Will an app-based reading intervention change how teachers rate their teaching self-efficacy beliefs?: A test of social cognitive theory in Swedish special educational settings. Frontiers in Education, 8, Article ID 1184719.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Will an app-based reading intervention change how teachers rate their teaching self-efficacy beliefs?: A test of social cognitive theory in Swedish special educational settings
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Education, E-ISSN 2504-284X, Vol. 8, article id 1184719Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Educational researchers have challenged Bandura’s prediction that self-efficacy beliefs tend to be established early in learning and that once set, self-efficacy beliefs persist unless a critical event causes them to be reevaluated. However, the results have been mixed in previous research, including being positive, negative, and unchanged. In response, we evaluated how 75 teachers (i.e., special educators) rate their teaching self-efficacy beliefs in motivating student reading and adapting reading instruction at two time points. All teachers taught students with an intellectual disability, communication difficulties, and poor reading skills. The teachers participated in a workshop to learn teaching reading strategies with apps under various conditions (comprehension strategies, phonemic strategies, or both comprehension and phonemic strategies). We analyzed teacher self-efficacy beliefs at two time points with a 12-week span (pre-and postintervention). First, we developed measures of teacher self-efficacy through confirmatory factor analyses. Next, we analyzed the data with multiple imputation and mixed linear regression with difference-in-differences (DiD). The results indicated no statistically significant treatment effect on teachers’ rating of their teaching self-efficacy beliefs. We conclude that our results agree with Bandura’s original prediction and thus, his social cognitive theory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2023
Keywords
teacher self-efficacy beliefs; reading research; special education; intellectual disability; computer-assisted instruction; social cognitive theory
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-196529 (URN)10.3389/feduc.2023.1184719 (DOI)001049580800001 ()
Funder
Wallenberg Foundations, 2018.0084Swedish Research Council, 2018–04702
Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2023-12-18
Rudner, M., Heimann, M. & Holmer, E. (2022). Ease of Language Undestanding in deaf and hard of hearing children: Sign language and reading (1ed.). In: Ana Belén, Domínguez Gutiérrez-Mariana Valmaseda & Carmela Velasco Alonso (Ed.), Tendencias actuales en la investigación en lenguaje escrito y sordera: (pp. 87-101). Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ease of Language Undestanding in deaf and hard of hearing children: Sign language and reading
2022 (English)In: Tendencias actuales en la investigación en lenguaje escrito y sordera / [ed] Ana Belén, Domínguez Gutiérrez-Mariana Valmaseda & Carmela Velasco Alonso, Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca , 2022, 1, p. 87-101Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This is an empirical study, preceded by a corresponding review of the state of the art, to demonstrate that, as suggested by the notion of multimodal language processing in the ELU model, an intervention basedon training the connection between sign language and reading can be a very useful method to improve word reading among children who are def or hard of hearing who know sign language.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca, 2022 Edition: 1
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-193951 (URN)978-84-1311-760-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-05-21 Created: 2023-05-21 Last updated: 2023-05-21
Heimann, M. (2022). Imitation from Infancy Through Early Childhood: Typical and Atypical Development (1ed.). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imitation from Infancy Through Early Childhood: Typical and Atypical Development
2022 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This book summarizes more than four decades of research on imitation in infancy and its relation to early learning and sociocognitive development in typically and atypically developing children. The studies were carried out in a Scandinavian context and thus provide important cultural validation of the central developmental processes. The book is divided into three parts: Part one focuses on the social and cognitive aspects of imitation, discussing links to early parent-infant interaction, and developmental meaning. It addresses evidence for an imitative capacity at birth for typical and atypical infants. Also covered are early individual differences in imitation, the role of imitation as a social and cognitive learning mechanism in early development, and possible links between imitation and temperament. Part two presents unique longitudinal studies on early memory development using deferred imitation as the key method. It discusses the biological basis of memory and explores the idea that deferred imitation is an indicator of an infant’s ability to understand intentions. Part three focuses on imitation in young children with autism and with Down syndrome. It examines the role of imitation as a “deficit” as well as a vehicle for change when used interactively in early interventions for children with autism. Imitation from Infancy Through Early Childhood is an essential resource for researchers, professors, and graduate students as well as clinicians and other professionals in developmental psychology, cognitive development, psycholinguistics, child psychiatry, and developmental neuroscience. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2022. p. 201 Edition: 1
Keywords
Autism in infancy and early childhood; Cognition and imitation in infants; Deferred imitation in infancy and early childhood; Early individual differences in imitation; Early intervention for autism spectrum disorder; Early language development; Early memory development; Emulation and imitation in infants; Imitation and cognitive development in infants; Imitation and language development in infants; Imitation and learning in infants; Imitation and memory in infants; Imitation and temperament in infants; Imitation in infancy and early childhood; Infant psychology and psychiatry; Language development in infancy and early childhood; Mimicry in infancy and early childhood; Mother-infant interaction; Social learning in infancy and early childhood; Sociocognitive development in infancy and early childhood
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-203814 (URN)10.1007/978-3-031-08899-5 (DOI)2-s2.0-85163456558 (Scopus ID)9783031088995 (ISBN)9783031088988 (ISBN)9783031088995 (ISBN)
Available from: 2024-05-27 Created: 2024-05-27 Last updated: 2024-05-27
Sundqvist, A. (., Koch, F.-S., Söderberg, M., Barr, R. & Heimann, M. (2022). Qualitative and quantitative aspects of child-directed parental talk and the relation to 2-year-olds developing vocabulary. Infancy, 27(4), 682-699
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Qualitative and quantitative aspects of child-directed parental talk and the relation to 2-year-olds developing vocabulary
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2022 (English)In: Infancy, ISSN 1525-0008, E-ISSN 1532-7078, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 682-699Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although prior research has independently linked vocabulary development with toddlers media usage, parental mental state talk (MST), and parent-child conversational turn-taking (CTT), these variables have not been investigated within the same study. In this study, we focus on associations between these variables and 2-year-olds (N = 87) vocabulary. Child vocabulary and digital media use were measured through online questionnaires. We took a multimethod approach to measure parents child-directed talk. First, we used a home sound environment recording (Language ENvironment Analysis technology) to estimate parents talk (CTT). Second, parents narrated a picture book, the Frog story, to assess the parents MST. There was a negative association between how much children watched video content and their vocabulary. However, parents reported that they frequently co-viewed and engaged with the child and media. The negative association first displayed between the amount of video content viewed and the childs developing vocabulary was fully mediated by the parents qualitative and quantitative talk as measured by MST and CCT, respectively. We propose that the parent relative level of MST and CTT also occurs when parents engage with the child during media use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2022
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-185236 (URN)10.1111/infa.12476 (DOI)000791965000001 ()35526265 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Forskningsradet om Halsa, Arbetsliv och Valfard [2016-00048, 2020-00229]; Vetenskapsradet [2016-01033]

Available from: 2022-05-23 Created: 2022-05-23 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Sundqvist, A. (. & Heimann, M. (2021). Inlevelseförmåga hos barn med funktionsnedsättning. In: Lisa Kilman, Josefine Andin, Håkan Hua, Jerker Rönnberg (Ed.), Leva som andra: Ett biopsykosocialt perspektiv på funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder (pp. 241-256). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inlevelseförmåga hos barn med funktionsnedsättning
2021 (Swedish)In: Leva som andra: Ett biopsykosocialt perspektiv på funktionsnedsättning och funktionshinder / [ed] Lisa Kilman, Josefine Andin, Håkan Hua, Jerker Rönnberg, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021, p. 241-256Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2021
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-187986 (URN)9789144121437 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-09-01 Created: 2022-09-01 Last updated: 2022-09-01
Heimann, M. & Holmer, E. (2021). Neonatal Imitation, Intersubjectivity, and Children With Atypical Development: Do Observations on Autism and Down Syndrome Change Our Understanding?. Frontiers in Psychology, 12, Article ID 701795.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neonatal Imitation, Intersubjectivity, and Children With Atypical Development: Do Observations on Autism and Down Syndrome Change Our Understanding?
2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 12, article id 701795Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Almost all studies on neonatal imitation to date seem to have focused on typically developing children, and we thus lack information on the early imitative abilities of children who follow atypical developmental trajectories. From both practical and theoretical perspectives, these abilities might be relevant to study in children who develop a neuropsychiatric diagnosis later on or in infants who later show impaired ability to imitate. Theoretical in the sense that it will provide insight into the earliest signs of intersubjectivity—i.e., primary intersubjectivity—and how this knowledge might influence our understanding of children following atypical trajectories of development. Practical in the sense that it might lead to earlier detection of certain disabilities. In the present work, we screen the literature for empirical studies on neonatal imitation in children with an Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or Down syndrome (DS) as well as present an observation of neonatal imitation in an infant that later was diagnosed with autism and a re-interpretation of previously published data on the phenomenon in a small group of infants with DS. Our findings suggest that the empirical observations to date are too few to draw any definite conclusions but that the existing data suggests that neonatal imitation can be observed both in children with ASD and in children with DS. Thus, neonatal imitation might not represent a useful predictor of a developmental deficit. Based on current theoretical perspectives advocating that neonatal imitation is a marker of primary intersubjectivity, we propose tentatively that an ability to engage in purposeful exchanges with another human being exists in these populations from birth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2021
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-178824 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2021.701795 (DOI)000697996100001 ()34512459 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding: Sven Jerring Foundation; Claes Groschinskys Foundation, Sweden; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social ResearchSwedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council for Health Working Life & Welfare (Forte) [2008-0875]; Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research CouncilEuropean Commission [2011-1913]; Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council for Health Working Life & Welfare (Forte) [2018-01840]; Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation (MAW) [2018.0084]

Available from: 2021-08-31 Created: 2021-08-31 Last updated: 2022-02-10
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5025-9975

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