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Liedberg, Bo
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Publications (10 of 172) Show all publications
Maleshlijski, S., Sendra, G. H., Aldred, N., Clare, A. S., Liedberg, B., Grunze, M., . . . Rosenhahn, A. (2016). Imaging SPR combined with stereoscopic 3D tracking to study barnacle cyprid-surface interactions. Surface Science, 643, 172-177
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Imaging SPR combined with stereoscopic 3D tracking to study barnacle cyprid-surface interactions
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2016 (English)In: Surface Science, ISSN 0039-6028, E-ISSN 1879-2758, Vol. 643, p. 172-177Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Barnacle larvae (cyprids) explore surfaces to identify suitable settlement sites. This process is selective, and cyprids respond to numerous surface cues. To better understand the settlement process, it is desirable to simultaneously monitor both the surface exploration behavior and any close interactions with the surface. Stereoscopic 3D tracking of the cyprids provides quantitative access to surface exploration and pre-settlement rituals. Imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPR) reveals any interactions with the surfaces, such as surface inspection during bipedal walking and deposition of temporary adhesives. We report on a combination of both techniques to bring together information on swimming behavior in the vicinity of the interface and physical interactions of the cyprid with the surface. The technical requirements are described, and we applied the setup to cyprids of Balanus amphitrite. Initial data shows the applicability of the combined instrument to correlate exploration and touchdown events on surfaces with different chemical termination. (C) 2015 Published by Elsevier B.V.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2016
Keyword
Barnacle cyprid; Balanus amphitrite; Stereoscopic 3D tracking; Surface exploration; Imaging surface plasmon resonance; Temporary adhesive
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124101 (URN)10.1016/j.susc.2015.08.027 (DOI)000366790700026 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|European Communitys Seventh Framework Programme FP7 [23797]; Office of Naval Research [N000141210498, N000141512324, N00014-13-1-0634, N00014-13-1-0633]

Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Koon Lim, S., Sandén, C., Selegård, R., Liedberg, B. & Aili, D. (2016). Tuning Liposome Membrane Permeability by Competitive Peptide Dimerization and Partitioning-Folding Interactions Regulated by Proteolytic Activity. Scientific Reports, 6(21123), 1-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tuning Liposome Membrane Permeability by Competitive Peptide Dimerization and Partitioning-Folding Interactions Regulated by Proteolytic Activity
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, no 21123, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Membrane active peptides are of large interest for development of drug delivery vehicles and therapeutics for treatment of multiple drug resistant infections. Lack of specificity can be detrimental and finding routes to tune specificity and activity of membrane active peptides is vital for improving their therapeutic efficacy and minimize harmful side effects. We describe a de novo designed membrane active peptide that partition into lipid membranes only when specifically and covalently anchored to the membrane, resulting in pore-formation. Dimerization with a complementary peptide efficiently inhibits formation of pores. The effect can be regulated by proteolytic digestion of the inhibitory peptide by the matrix metalloproteinase MMP-7, an enzyme upregulated in many malignant tumors. This system thus provides a precise and specific route for tuning the permeability of lipid membranes and a novel strategy for development of recognition based membrane active peptides and indirect enzymatically controlled release of liposomal cargo.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2016
National Category
Physical Sciences Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126131 (URN)10.1038/srep21123 (DOI)000370532500002 ()26892926 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Linkoping University; Swedish Research Council (VR); Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF); Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW); Centre in Nanoscience and Technology (CeNano); Provost Office, NTU

Available from: 2016-03-15 Created: 2016-03-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Vater, S. M., Finlay, J., Callow, M. E., Callow, J. A., Ederth, T., Liedberg, B., . . . Rosenhahn, A. (2015). Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces. Biofouling (Print), 31(2), 229-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Holographic microscopy provides new insights into the settlement of zoospores of the green alga Ulva linza on cationic oligopeptide surfaces
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2015 (English)In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 229-239Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Interaction of zoospores of Ulva linza with cationic, arginine-rich oligopeptide self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) is characterized by rapid settlement. Some spores settle (ie permanently attach) in a normal manner involving the secretion of a permanent adhesive, retraction of the flagella and cell wall formation, whilst others undergo pseudosettlement whereby motile spores are trapped (attached) on the SAM surface without undergoing the normal metamorphosis into a settled spore. Holographic microscopy was used to record videos of swimming zoospores in the vicinity of surfaces with different cationic oligopeptide concentrations to provide time-resolved insights into processes associated with attachment of spores. The data reveal that spore attachment rate increases with increasing cationic peptide content. Accordingly, the decrease in swimming activity in the volume of seawater above the surface accelerated with increasing surface charge. Three-dimensional trajectories of individual swimming spores showed a hit and stick motion pattern, exclusively observed for the arginine-rich peptide SAMs, whereby spores were immediately trapped upon contact with the surface.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis: STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Titles, 2015
Keyword
holographic microscopy; cationic peptides; zoospores; Ulva linza; tracking; 3-dimensional motility
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118256 (URN)10.1080/08927014.2015.1022534 (DOI)000353565900010 ()25875964 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|US Office of Naval Research [N000141210498, N0001-08-1-0010]; EU project AMBIO; DFG [RO 2524/2-2]

Available from: 2015-05-22 Created: 2015-05-22 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Yandi, W., Mieszkin, S., Martin-Tanchereau, P., Callow, M. E., Callow, J. A., Tyson, L., . . . Ederth, T. (2015). Hydration and chain entanglement determines the optimum thickness of poly(HEMA-co-PEG10MA) brushes for effective antifouling properties. In: : . Paper presented at ASMCS 2015, Colloids and surfaces in biology and biomaterials ‐ A symposium on surface and materials chemistry, 4 ‐ 6 November 2015, Uppsala, Sweden.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydration and chain entanglement determines the optimum thickness of poly(HEMA-co-PEG10MA) brushes for effective antifouling properties
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2015 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-122699 (URN)
Conference
ASMCS 2015, Colloids and surfaces in biology and biomaterials ‐ A symposium on surface and materials chemistry, 4 ‐ 6 November 2015, Uppsala, Sweden
Available from: 2015-11-16 Created: 2015-11-16 Last updated: 2017-01-11Bibliographically approved
Liu, X., Wang, Y., Chen, P., Wang, Y., Mang, J., Aili, D. & Liedberg, B. (2014). Biofunctionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Colorimetric Sensing of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Light Chain. Analytical Chemistry, 86(5), 2345-2352
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biofunctionalized Gold Nanoparticles for Colorimetric Sensing of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Light Chain
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2014 (English)In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 2345-2352Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Botulinum neurotoxin is considered as one of the most toxic food-borne substances and is a potential bioweapon accessible to terrorists. The development of an accurate, convenient, and rapid assay for botulinum neurotoxins is therefore highly desirable for addressing biosafety concerns. Herein, novel biotinylated peptide substrates designed to mimic synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) are utilized in gold nanoparticle-based assays for colorimetric detection of botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoLcA). In these proteolytic assays, biotinylated peptides serve as triggers for the aggregation of gold nanoparticles, while the cleavage of these peptides by BoLcA prevents nanoparticle aggregation. Two different assay strategies are described, demonstrating limits of detection ranging from 5 to 0.1 nM of BoLcA with an overall assay time of 4 h. These hybrid enzyme-responsive nanomaterials provide rapid and sensitive detection for one of the most toxic substances known to man.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2014
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105897 (URN)10.1021/ac402626g (DOI)000332494100014 ()
Available from: 2014-04-14 Created: 2014-04-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Di Fino, A., Petrone, L., Aldred, N., Ederth, T., Liedberg, B. & Clare, A. S. (2014). Correlation between surface chemistry and settlement behaviour in barnacle cyprids (Balanus improvisus). Biofouling (Print), 30(2), 143-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlation between surface chemistry and settlement behaviour in barnacle cyprids (Balanus improvisus)
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2014 (English)In: Biofouling (Print), ISSN 0892-7014, E-ISSN 1029-2454, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 143-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In laboratory-based biofouling assays, the influence of physico-chemical surface characteristics on barnacle settlement has been tested most frequently using the model organism Balanus amphitrite (= Amphibalanus amphitrite). Very few studies have addressed the settlement preferences of other barnacle species, such as Balanus improvisus (= Amphibalanus improvisus). This study aimed to unravel the effects of surface physico-chemical cues, in particular surface-free energy (SFE) and surface charge, on the settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus. The use of well-defined surfaces under controlled conditions further facilitates comparison of the results with recent similar data for B. amphitrite. Zero-day-old cyprids of B. improvisus were exposed to a series of model surfaces, namely self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols with varying end-groups, homogenously applied to gold-coated polystyrene (PS) Petri dishes. As with B. amphitrite, settlement of cyprids of B. improvisus was influenced by both SFE and charge, with higher settlement on low-energy (hydrophobic) surfaces and negatively charged SAMs. Positively charged SAMs resulted in low settlement, with intermediate settlement on neutral SAMs of similar SFE. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that despite previous suggestions to the contrary, these two species of barnacle show similar preferences in response to SFE; they also respond similarly to charge. These findings have positive implications for the development of novel antifouling (AF) coatings and support the importance of consistency in substratum choice for assays designed to compare surface preferences of fouling organisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor andamp; Francis: STM, Behavioural Science and Public Health Titles, 2014
Keyword
cyprid; antifouling; Balanus improvisus; self-assembled monolayer; surface energy; surface charge
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-104280 (URN)10.1080/08927014.2013.852541 (DOI)000329963000002 ()
Available from: 2014-02-17 Created: 2014-02-14 Last updated: 2017-05-31
Lundgren, A., Hulander, M., Brorsson, J., Hermansson, M., Elwing, H., Andersson, O., . . . Berglin, M. (2014). Gold-Nanoparticle-Assisted Self-Assembly of Chemical Gradients with Tunable Sub-50 nm Molecular Domains. Particle & particle systems characterization, 31(2), 209-218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gold-Nanoparticle-Assisted Self-Assembly of Chemical Gradients with Tunable Sub-50 nm Molecular Domains
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2014 (English)In: Particle & particle systems characterization, ISSN 0934-0866, E-ISSN 1521-4117, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 209-218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A simple and efficient principle for nanopatterning with wide applicability in the sub-50 nanometer regime is chemisorption of nanoparticles; at homogeneous substrates, particles carrying surface charge may spontaneously self-organize due to the electrostatic repulsion between adjacent particles. Guided by this principle, a method is presented to design, self-assemble, and chemically functionalize gradient nanopatterns where the size of molecular domains can be tuned to match the level corresponding to single protein binding events. To modulate the binding of negatively charged gold nanoparticles both locally (less than100 nm) and globally (greater than100 m) onto a single modified gold substrate, ion diffusion is used to achieve spatial control of the particles mutual electrostatic interactions. By subsequent tailoring of different molecules to surface-immobilized particles and the void areas surrounding them, nanopatterns are obtained with variable chemical domains along the gradient surface. Fimbriated Escherichia coli bacteria are bound to gradient nanopatterns with similar molecular composition and macroscopic contact angle, but different sizes of nanoscopic presentation of adhesive (hydrophobic) and repellent poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) domains. It is shown that small hydrophobic domains, similar in size to the diameter of the bacterial fimbriae, supported firmly attached bacteria resembling catch-bond binding, whereas a high number of loosely adhered bacteria are observed on larger hydrophobic domains.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlag, 2014
Keyword
bacterial adhesion; chemical gradients; gold nanoparticles; imaging surface plasmon resonance; protein nanopatterns
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105760 (URN)10.1002/ppsc.201300154 (DOI)000331904500005 ()
Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Yandi, W., Mieszkin, S., Martin-Tanchereau, P., Callow, M. E., Callow, J. A., Tyson, L., . . . Ederth, T. (2014). Hydration and Chain Entanglement Determines the Optimum Thickness of Poly(HEMA-co-PEG(10)MA) Brushes for Effective Resistance to Settlement and Adhesion of Marine Fouling Organisms. ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, 6(14), 11448-11458
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydration and Chain Entanglement Determines the Optimum Thickness of Poly(HEMA-co-PEG(10)MA) Brushes for Effective Resistance to Settlement and Adhesion of Marine Fouling Organisms
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2014 (English)In: ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, ISSN 1944-8244, E-ISSN 1944-8252, Vol. 6, no 14, p. 11448-11458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding how surface physicochemical properties influence the settlement and adhesion of marine fouling organisms is important for the development of effective and environmentally benign marine antifouling coatings. We demonstrate that the thickness of random poly(HEMA-co-PEG(10)DMA) copolymer brushes affect antifouling behavior. Films of thicknesses ranging from 50 to 1000 angstrom were prepared via surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization and characterized using infrared spectroscopy, ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements. The fouling resistance of these films was investigated by protein adsorption, attachment of the marine bacterium Cobetia marina, settlement and strength of attachment tests of zoospores of the marine alga Ulva linza and static immersion field tests. These assays show that the polymer film thickness influenced the antifouling performance, in that there is an optimum thickness range, 200-400 angstrom (dry thickness), where fouling of all types, as well as algal spore adhesion, was lower. Field test results also showed lower fouling within the same thickness range after 2 weeks of immersion. Studies by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and underwater captive bubble contact angle measurements show a strong correlation between lower fouling and higher hydration, viscosity and surface energy of the poly(HEMA-co-PEG(10)MA) brushes at thicknesses around 200-400 angstrom. We hypothesize that the reduced antifouling performance is caused by a lower hydration capacity of the polymer for thinner films, and that entanglement and crowding in the film reduces the conformational freedom, hydration capacity and fouling resistance for thicker films.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society, 2014
Keyword
marine fouling; polymer brushes; SI-ATRP; fibrinogen; Cobetia marina; Ulva linza
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109882 (URN)10.1021/am502084x (DOI)000339472100078 ()24945705 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|European Community [237997]; Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Functional Materials at Linkoping University (Faculty Grant SFO-Mat-LiU) [2009-00971]

Available from: 2014-08-28 Created: 2014-08-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Martinsson, E., Sepulveda, B., Chen, P., Elfwing, A., Liedberg, B. & Aili, D. (2014). Optimizing the Refractive Index Sensitivity of Plasmonically Coupled Gold Nanoparticles. PLASMONICS, 9(4), 773-780
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optimizing the Refractive Index Sensitivity of Plasmonically Coupled Gold Nanoparticles
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2014 (English)In: PLASMONICS, ISSN 1557-1955, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 773-780Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The possibility to enhance the local refractive index sensitivity using plasmonic coupling between spherical gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) has been investigated. A strong and distinct optical coupling between Au-NPs of various sizes was achieved by controlling the interparticle separation using a layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolytes. The frequency of the coupled plasmon peak could be tuned by varying either the particle size or the interparticle separation, shown both experimentally and by theoretical simulations. The bulk refractive index (RI) sensitivity for the plasmonic coupling modes was investigated and compared to the RI sensitivity of monolayers of well-separated Au-NPs, and the results clearly demonstrates that the RI sensitivity can be significantly enhanced in plasmonically coupled Au-NPs. The proposed approach is simple and scalable and improves the rather modest RI sensitivity of spherical gold nanoparticles with a factor of 3, providing a new route for fabrication of inexpensive sensors based on plasmonic nanostructures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag (Germany), 2014
Keyword
Metal nanoparticles; Localized surface plasmon resonance ( LSPR); Plasmonic coupling; Polyelectrolytes; Layer-by-layer
National Category
Physical Sciences Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111291 (URN)10.1007/s11468-013-9659-y (DOI)000341423800007 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Link ping University; Swedish Research Council (VR); Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research (SSF); Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW); Center in Nano science and technology (CeNano); MINECO, Explora Project [MAT2011-12645-E]

Available from: 2014-10-14 Created: 2014-10-14 Last updated: 2014-11-06
Wickham, A. M., Islam, M. M., Mondal, D., Phopase, J., Sadhu, V., Tamás, É., . . . Griffith, M. (2014). Polycaprolactone–thiophene-conjugated carbon nanotube meshes as scaffolds for cardiac progenitor cells. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, 102(7), 1553-1561
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Polycaprolactone–thiophene-conjugated carbon nanotube meshes as scaffolds for cardiac progenitor cells
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2014 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 102, no 7, p. 1553-1561Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The myocardium is unable to regenerate itself after infarct, resulting in scarring and thinning of the heart wall. Our objective was to develop a patch to buttress and bypass the scarred area, while allowing regeneration by incorporated cardiac stem/progenitor cells (CPCs). Polycaprolactone (PCL) was fabricated as both sheets by solvent casting, and fibrous meshes by electrospinning, as potential patches, to determine the role of topology in proliferation and phenotypic changes to the CPCs. Thiophene-conjugated carbon nanotubes (T-CNTs) were incorporated to enhance the mechanical strength. We showed that freshly isolated CPCs from murine hearts neither attached nor spread on the PCL sheets, both with and without T-CNT. As electrospun meshes, however, both PCL and PCL/T-CNT supported CPC adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The incorporation of T-CNT into PCL resulted in a significant increase in mechanical strength but no morphological changes to the meshes. In turn, proliferation, but not differentiation, of CPCs into cardiomyocytes was enhanced in T-CNT containing meshes. We have shown that changing the topology of PCL, a known hydrophobic material, dramatically altered its properties, in this case, allowing CPCs to survive and differentiate. With further development, PCL/T-CNT meshes or similar patches may become a viable strategy to aid restoration of the postmyocardial infarction myocardium.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2014
Keyword
topology, carbon nanotubes, polycaprolactone, cardiac progenitor cells, electrospun meshes
National Category
Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111488 (URN)10.1002/jbm.b.33136 (DOI)000342963000020 ()24664884 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-10-19 Created: 2014-10-19 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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