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Wijma, Barbro
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Publications (10 of 123) Show all publications
Smirthwaite, G., Lundstrom, M., Wijma, B., Lykke, N. & Swahnberg, K. (2016). Correction: Inequity in waiting for cataract surgery - an analysis of data from the Swedish National Cataract Register (vol 15, 10, 2016). International Journal for Equity in Health, 15(63)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correction: Inequity in waiting for cataract surgery - an analysis of data from the Swedish National Cataract Register (vol 15, 10, 2016)
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2016 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 15, no 63Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2016
National Category
Clinical Medicine Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128750 (URN)10.1186/s12939-016-0355-3 (DOI)000374521600001 ()27068258 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-06-01 Created: 2016-05-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Smirthwaite, G., Lundstrom, M., Wijma, B., Lykke, N. & Swahnberg, K. (2016). Inequity in waiting for cataract surgery - an analysis of data from the Swedish National Cataract Register. International Journal for Equity in Health, 15(10)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inequity in waiting for cataract surgery - an analysis of data from the Swedish National Cataract Register
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2016 (English)In: International Journal for Equity in Health, ISSN 1475-9276, E-ISSN 1475-9276, Vol. 15, no 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Swedish Health and Medical Services act states that good care should be given to the entire population on equal terms. Still studies show that access to care in Sweden differ related to for example gender and socioeconomic variables. One of the areas in Swedish health care that has attracted attention for potential inequity in access is Cataract Extraction (CE). Previous studies of access to CE in Sweden show that female patients have in general poorer vision before they are operated and longer waiting times for CE than male patients. The aim of the study was to describe the waiting times in different patient groups with regards to visual acuity, gender, age, native country, educational level, annual income and whether the patient was retired or still working. Methods: The study was designed as a register study of 102 532 patients who have had CE performed in Sweden 2010-2011. Linear regression was used to analyse the association between patient characteristics and waiting times. Mean waiting times for women and men were calculated for all groups. Results: At significance level p < 0.05 longer waiting times corresponded to patients having good visual acuity, being of female gender, high age, retired, born outside the Nordic countries and having low income and education. Calculations of mean waiting times for all groups showed that women had longer waiting times than men. Conclusions: The differences between groups defined, for example, by gender, age, native country, income, education and retirement are statistically significant. We do not consider them as clinically significant, but we consider the consistent pattern that we have found noteworthy in relation to the principle of equity in health care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2016
Keyword
Health inequalities; Social inequity; Cataract extraction; Intersectionality; Gender; Doing gender
National Category
Clinical Medicine Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125151 (URN)10.1186/s12939-016-0302-3 (DOI)000368796300002 ()26786522 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-15 Created: 2016-02-15 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Pelters, B. & Wijma, B. (2016). Neither a sinner nor a saint: Health as a present-day religion in the age of healthism. Social Theory & Health, 14(1), 129-148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neither a sinner nor a saint: Health as a present-day religion in the age of healthism
2016 (English)In: Social Theory & Health, ISSN 1477-8211, E-ISSN 1477-822X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 129-148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Western societies, religious imagery is often used in conjunction with the topic health in this biomedicalized, healthistic time, but is that enough to qualify the structural characteristics of the presentations and practices of health as a present-day health religion? And what may be gained by adopting such a perspective? This article explores these questions by a hermeneutical rereading, using a comprehensive list of 10 religious features derived from the sociology of religion on texts describing (a) religiously charged health phenomena, (b) the interconnection between health and society and (c) health theories. The results show that health can rightfully be called a religion, with characteristics resembling Webets protestant work ethic, which may accelerate the formation of a new economic and health-related underclass. Viewing health from a religious angle has the potential of introducing new concepts and ideas of religious origin into the sphere of health. We believe that this introduction will facilitate and inspire new ways of thinking about health which add a religious edge to the seeming rationality of health, that is, an emotionalized commitment to health as a dignified authority, which an understanding of health as a moral obligation hardly captures.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PALGRAVE MACMILLAN LTD, 2016
Keyword
representations of health; religion; power; healthism; commitment
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125309 (URN)10.1057/sth.2015.21 (DOI)000368960800007 ()
Available from: 2016-02-24 Created: 2016-02-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Wijma, B., Zbikowski, A. & Brüggemann, J. (2016). Silence, shame and abuse in health care: theoretical development on basis of an intervention project among staff. BMC Medical Education, 16(75)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Silence, shame and abuse in health care: theoretical development on basis of an intervention project among staff
2016 (English)In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 16, no 75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As health care exists to alleviate patients suffering it is unacceptable that it inflicts unnecessary suffering on patients. We therefore have developed and evaluated a drama pedagogical model for staff interventions using Forum Play, focusing on staffs experiences of failed encounters where they have perceived that the patient felt abused. In the current paper we present how our preliminary theoretical framework of intervening against abuse in health care developed and was revised during this intervention. During and after the intervention, five important lessons were learned and incorporated in our present theoretical framework. First, a Forum Play intervention may break the silence culture that surrounds abuse in health care. Second, organizing staff training in groups was essential and transformed abuse from being an individual problem inflicting shame into a collective responsibility. Third, initial theoretical concepts "moral resources" and "the vicious violence triangle" proved valuable and became useful pedagogical tools during the intervention. Four, the intervention can be understood as having strengthened staffs moral resources. Five, regret appeared to be an underexplored resource in medical training and clinical work. The occurrence of abuse in health care is a complex phenomenon and the research area is in need of theoretical understanding. We hope this paper can inspire others to further develop theories and interventions in order to counteract abuse in health care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2016
Keyword
Sweden; Abuse in health care; Forum play; Silence; Shame; Regret; Health care intervention; Professional education; Moral learning
National Category
Clinical Medicine Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126252 (URN)10.1186/s12909-016-0595-3 (DOI)000371126800004 ()26922381 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2006-2503, 2009-2380, 2011-2478, 2014-2749]

Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Nieminen, K., Andersson, G., Wijma, B., Ryding, E.-L. & Wijma, K. (2016). Treatment of nulliparous women with severe fear of childbirth via the Internet: a feasibility study. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 37(2), 37-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treatment of nulliparous women with severe fear of childbirth via the Internet: a feasibility study
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics and Gynaecology, ISSN 0167-482X, E-ISSN 1743-8942, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 37-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the present study was to test the feasibility of Internet interventions among nulliparous women suffering from severe fear of childbirth (FOC) by means of an Internet-delivered therapist-supported self-help program based on cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT).

Design: Prospective, longitudinal cohort study.Setting: A feasibility study of an ICBT program for the treatment of severe FOC in pregnant women.Sample: Twenty-eight Swedish-speaking nulliparous women with severe FOC recruited via a project home page from January 2012 to December 2013.

Methods: The main components of the ICBT program for the treatment of severe FOC comprised psycho-education, breathing retraining, cognitive restructuring, imaginary exposure, in vivo exposure and relapse prevention. The study participants were anonymously self-recruited over the Internet, interviewed by telephone and then enrolled. All participants were offered 8 weeks of treatment via the Internet. Participants reported their homework weekly, submitted measurements of their fear and received feedback from a therapist via a secure online contact management system.

Main outcome measures: Level of FOC measured with the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (W-DEQ A) during screening at enrollment and weekly during the treatment (W-DEQ version A), and after the delivery (W-DEQ version B).

Results: A statistically significant (p < 0.0005) decrease of FOC [W-DEQ sum score decreased pre to post-therapy, with a large effect size (Cohen’s d = 0.95)].Conclusions: The results of this feasibility study suggest that ICBT has potential in the treatment of severe FOC during pregnancy in motivated nulliparous women. The results need to be confirmed by randomized controlled studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
National Category
Clinical Medicine Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126491 (URN)10.3109/0167482X.2016.1140143 (DOI)000372410100001 ()26918752 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE); Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); County Council in Ostergotland (LIO)

Available from: 2016-03-29 Created: 2016-03-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Brüggemann, J., Swahnberg, K. & Wijma, B. (2015). A first online intervention to increase patients perceived ability to act in situations of abuse in health care: reports of a Swedish pre-post study. BMC Medical Ethics, 16(35)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A first online intervention to increase patients perceived ability to act in situations of abuse in health care: reports of a Swedish pre-post study
2015 (English)In: BMC Medical Ethics, ISSN 1472-6939, E-ISSN 1472-6939, Vol. 16, no 35Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Efforts to counteract abuse in health care, defined as patient-experienced abuse, have mainly focused on interventions among caregivers. This study is the first to test an online intervention focusing on how patients can counteract such abuse. The intervention aimed at increasing patients intention and perceived ability to act in future situations where they risk experiencing abuse. Methods: Participants were recruited through a nephrology clinic in Sweden. The intervention consisted of an online program that aimed to stimulate patients to think of possible actions in situations in which they risk experiencing abuse. The program comprised stories and exercises in text and comic form. The participants filled out a questionnaire immediately before and after going through the program, as well as during follow-up four to eight weeks later. Results: Forty-eight patients (39 %) participated in the study and spent, on average, 41 min responding to questions and going through the program. Both men and women, of various ages and educational backgrounds, participated. An increase in participants self-reported ability to identify opportunities to act in a given situation was seen immediately afterwards, as well as during follow up. Conclusion: The current study suggests that it is feasible and most likely useful to a variety of patients to work with the provided material that has the aim of counteracting abuse in health care. It would be of interest to further develop ways of using comics and to test similar interventions in other health care settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keyword
Abuse in health care; Patient intervention; Online intervention; Patient empowerment; Comics
National Category
Other Social Sciences Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121147 (URN)10.1186/s12910-015-0027-7 (DOI)000359415300001 ()26003674 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [2011-2478]

Available from: 2015-09-08 Created: 2015-09-08 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Simmons, J., Wijma, B. & Swahnberg, K. (2015). Lifetime co-occurrence of violence victimisation and symptoms of psychological ill health: a cross-sectional study of Swedish male and female clinical and population samples. BMC Public Health, 15, Article ID 979.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lifetime co-occurrence of violence victimisation and symptoms of psychological ill health: a cross-sectional study of Swedish male and female clinical and population samples
2015 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, article id 979Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Lifetime co-occurrence of violence victimisation is common. A large proportion of victims report being exposed to multiple forms of violence (physical, sexual, emotional violence) and/or violence by multiple kinds of perpetrators (family members, intimate partners, acquaintances/strangers). Yet much research focuses on only one kind of victimisation. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between symptoms of psychological ill health, and A) exposure to multiple forms of violence, and B) violence by multiple perpetrators.

Method

Secondary analysis of cross-sectional data previously collected for prevalence studies on interpersonal violence in Sweden was used. Respondents were recruited at hospital clinics (women n = 2439, men n = 1767) and at random from the general population (women n = 1168, men n  = 2924). Multinomial regression analysis was used to estimate associations between exposure to violence and symptoms of psychological ill health.

Results

Among both men and women and in both clinical and population samples, exposure to multiple forms of violence as well as violence by multiple perpetrators were more strongly associated with symptoms of psychological ill health than reporting one form of violence or violence by one perpetrator. For example, in the female population sample, victims reporting all three forms of violence were four times more likely to report many symptoms of psychological ill health compared to those reporting only one form of violence (adj OR: 3.8, 95 % CI 1.6–8.8). In the male clinical sample, victims reporting two or three kind of perpetrators were three times more likely to report many symptoms of psychological ill health than those reporting violence by one perpetrator (adj OR 3.3 95 % CI 1.9–5.9).

Discussion

The strong association found between lifetime co-occurrence of violence victimisation and symptoms of psychological ill-health is important to consider in both research and clinic work. If only the effect of one form of violence or violence by one kind of perpetrator is considered this may lead to a misinterpretation of the association between violence and psychological ill health. When the effect of unmeasured traumata is ignored, the full burden of violence experienced by victims may be underestimated.

Conclusion

Different kinds of victimisation can work interactively, making exposure to multiple forms of violence as well as violence by multiple perpetrators more strongly associated with symptoms of psychological ill health than any one kind of victimisation alone.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keyword
Abuse, Mental health, Stress, Intimate Partner Violence, Revictimization, polyvictimization
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114676 (URN)10.1186/s12889-015-2311-3 (DOI)000361795600010 ()
Note

On the day of the defence date the status of this article was Manuscript and the original title was Cumulative violence and symptoms of psychological ill-health : importance of the interplay between exposure to different kinds of interpersonal violence in Swedish male and female clinical and population samples.Funding: Nordic Council of Ministers

Available from: 2015-03-02 Created: 2015-03-02 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Nieminen, K., Malmquist, A., Wijma, B., Ryding, E.-L., Andersson, G. & Wijma, K. (2015). Nulliparous pregnant womens narratives of imminent childbirth before and after internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for severe fear of childbirth: a qualitative study. British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 122(9), 1259-1265
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nulliparous pregnant womens narratives of imminent childbirth before and after internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for severe fear of childbirth: a qualitative study
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2015 (English)In: British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, ISSN 1470-0328, E-ISSN 1471-0528, Vol. 122, no 9, p. 1259-1265Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectiveTo describe the expectations concerning imminent childbirth before and after 8weeks of internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) among nulliparous pregnant women with severe fear of childbirth. DesignQualitative study of nulliparous pregnant womens narratives before and after CBT. SettingThe first ICBT programme for treating severe fear of childbirth. SampleFifteen nulliparous pregnant Swedish women with severe fear of childbirth participating in an ICBT self-help programme. MethodsSemi-structured open-ended questions over the internet before and after 8weeks of ICBT. The data were analysed using thematic analysis. Main outcome measuresThe participants narratives pertaining to five different situations during labour and delivery before and after ICBT. ResultsAfter therapy, participants described a more realistic attitude towards imminent childbirth, more self-confidence and more active coping strategies. They perceived their partners and the staff as more supportive. They were more aware of the approaching meeting with their baby when giving birth. ConclusionsFollowing the ICBT programme, participants changed their attitude towards imminent childbirth from negative to more positive. This was manifested in positive and more realistic expectations regarding themselves, their partner and the staff that would look after them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley: 12 months, 2015
Keyword
Active coping; appraisal; delivery; fear of childbirth; internet cognitive behavioural therapy; self-confidence
National Category
Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-120728 (URN)10.1111/1471-0528.13358 (DOI)000358619900020 ()25817045 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE); Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS); County Council in Ostergotland (LIO)

Available from: 2015-08-24 Created: 2015-08-24 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Brohede, S., Wingren, G., Wijma, B. & Wijma, K. (2015). Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among Swedish women: A population-based study. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 58, 108-115
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder among Swedish women: A population-based study
2015 (English)In: Comprehensive Psychiatry, ISSN 0010-440X, E-ISSN 1532-8384, Vol. 58, p. 108-115Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is characterized by a highly distressing and impairing preoccupation with nonexistent or slight defects in appearance. Patients with BDD present to both psychiatric and non-psychiatric physicians. A few studies have assessed BDD prevalence in representative samples of the general population and have demonstrated that this disorder is relatively common. Our primary objective was to assess the prevalence of BDD in the Swedish population because no data are currently available. Methods: In the current cross-sectional study, 2891 randomly selected Swedish women aged 18-60 years participated. The occurrence of BDD was assessed using the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire (BDDQ), which is a validated self-report measure derived from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria for BDD. In addition, symptoms of depression and anxiety were measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results: The prevalence of BDD among Swedish women was 2.1%. The women with BDD had significantly more symptoms of depression and anxiety than the women without BDD. Depression (HADS depression score greater than= 8) and anxiety (HADS anxiety score greater than= 8) were reported by 42% and 72% of the women with BDD, respectively. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate that BDD is relatively common among Swedish women (2.1%) and that it is associated with significant morbidity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WB Saunders, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117368 (URN)10.1016/j.comppsych.2014.12.014 (DOI)000351807800015 ()25617963 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Linkoping University; Ostergotland County Council

Available from: 2015-04-24 Created: 2015-04-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Simmons, J., Wijma, B. & Swahnberg, K. (2014). Associations and Experiences Observed for Family and Nonfamily Forms of Violent Behavior in Different Relational Contexts Among Swedish Men and Women. Violence and Victims, 29(1), 152-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations and Experiences Observed for Family and Nonfamily Forms of Violent Behavior in Different Relational Contexts Among Swedish Men and Women
2014 (English)In: Violence and Victims, ISSN 0886-6708, E-ISSN 1945-7073, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 152-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to examine how lifetime experiences of different types of violent behavior as well as violence by different kinds of perpetrators overlap, and to investigate the co-occurrence of experiences of violent behavior by kind of perpetrator. This was done among both sexes in both a random sample from a county population (women n = 1,168, men n = 2,924) and a clinical sample (women n = 2,439, men, n = 1,767) in Sweden. More than 1 kind of perpetrator was reported by 33%-37% of female and 22%-23% of male victims of some kind of violence, whereas 47%-48% of female and 29%-31% of male victims reported more than 1 kind of violence. The reporting of 2 or 3 kinds of perpetrators was associated with the reporting of experiences of more than 1 kind of violent behavior. Health care providers must be trained to recognize the overlap of violent victimization and help prevent further victimization of those who already have such experiences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Co, 2014
Keyword
revictimization; gender; cumulative violence; perpetrator; multiple victimization
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105043 (URN)10.1891/0886-6708.VV-D-12-00084 (DOI)000330514100010 ()2-s2.0-84899457345 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-03-06 Created: 2014-03-06 Last updated: 2017-12-05
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