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Johansson, AnnaKarin
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Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Wennerholm, C., Bromley, C., Johansson, A., Nilsson, S., Frank, J. & Faresjö, T. (2017). Two tales of cardiovascular risks-middle-aged women living in Sweden and Scotland: a cross-sectional comparative study. BMJ Open, 7(8), Article ID e016527.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two tales of cardiovascular risks-middle-aged women living in Sweden and Scotland: a cross-sectional comparative study
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2017 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 8, article id e016527Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To compare cardiovascular risk factors as well as rates of cardiovascular diseases in middle-aged women from urban areas in Scotland and Sweden.

DESIGN: Comparative cross-sectional study.

SETTING: Data from the general population in urban areas of Scotland and the general population in two major Swedish cities in southeast Sweden, south of Stockholm.

PARTICIPANTS: Comparable data of middle-aged women (40-65 years) from the Scottish Health Survey (n=6250) and the Swedish QWIN study (n=741) were merged together into a new dataset (n=6991 participants).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: We compared middle-aged women in urban areas in Sweden and Scotland regarding risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD), CVD diagnosis, anthropometrics, psychological distress and lifestyle.

RESULTS: In almost all measurements, there were significant differences between the countries, favouring the Swedish women. Scottish women demonstrated a higher frequency of alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity, low vegetable consumption, a sedentary lifestyle and also more psychological distress. For doctor-diagnosed coronary heart disease, there were also significant differences, with a higher prevalence among the Scottish women.

CONCLUSIONS: This is one of the first studies that clearly shows that Scottish middle-aged women are particularly affected by a worse profile of CVD risks. The profound differences in CVD risk and outcome frequency in the two populations are likely to have arisen from differences in the two groups of women's social, cultural, political and economic environments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017
Keywords
cardiovascular risk factors, comparative study, lifestyle, middle-aged women, psychological distress, public health
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140935 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016527 (DOI)000411802700172 ()28790040 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85027162863 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding agencies: Swedish Heart and Lung Association [E136-15/E106/13]; Clinic ALF funds, Region Ostergotland, Sweden [LiO-446241]; Research and PhD studies Committee (FUN), Linkoping University, Sweden [LiU-2014-020251]

Available from: 2017-09-18 Created: 2017-09-18 Last updated: 2018-05-03Bibliographically approved
Johansson, A., Carlsson, N., Almfors, H., Rosén, M. & Alehagen, S. (2014). Parents' experiences of participating in an intervention on tobacco prevention in Child Health Care. BMC Pediatrics, 14(69)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents' experiences of participating in an intervention on tobacco prevention in Child Health Care
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2014 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 14, no 69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Child health care is an important arena for tobacco prevention in Sweden. The aim of this study was to describe parents’ experiences from participating in a nursebased tobacco prevention intervention.     

Methods

Eleven parents were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. The material was analysed in a qualitative content analysis process.     

Results

The analysis emerged four categories; Receiving support, Respectful treatment, Influence on smoking habits and Receiving information. The parents described how the CHC nurses treated them with support and respect. They described the importance of being treated with respect for their autonomy in their decisions about smoking. They also claimed that they had received little or no information about health consequences for children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). The findings also indicate that both the questionnaire used and the urine-cotinine test had influenced parents’ smoking.     

Conclusion

The clinical implication is that CHC is an important arena for preventive work aiming to minimize children’s tobacco smoke exposure. CHC nurses can play an important role in tobacco prevention but should be more explicit in their communication with parents about tobacco issues. The SiCET was referred to as an eye-opener and can be useful in the MI dialogues nurses perform in order to support parents in their efforts to protect their children from ETS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105308 (URN)10.1186/1471-2431-14-69 (DOI)000335411500002 ()
Available from: 2014-03-17 Created: 2014-03-17 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, N., Johansson, A., Abrahamsson, A. & Andersson-Gäre, B. (2013). How to minimize children’s environmental tobacco smoke exposure: An intervention study in a child health service setting. BMC Pediatrics, 13(76)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to minimize children’s environmental tobacco smoke exposure: An intervention study in a child health service setting
2013 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 13, no 76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite the low prevalence of daily smokers in Sweden, children are still being exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), primarily by their smoking parents. A prospective intervention study using methods from Quality Improvement was performed in Child Health Care (CHC). The aim was to provide nurses with new methods for motivating and supporting parents in their efforts to protect children from ETS exposure. Method: Collaborative learning was used to implement and test an intervention bundle. Twenty-two CHC nurses recruited 86 families with small children which had at least one smoking parent. Using a bundle of interventions, nurses met and had dialogues with the parents over a one-year period. A detailed questionnaire on cigarette consumption and smoking policies in the home was answered by the parents at the beginning and at the end of the intervention, when children also took urine tests to determine cotinine levels. Results: Seventy-two families completed the study. Ten parents (11%) quit smoking. Thirty-two families (44%) decreased their cigarette consumption. Forty-five families (63%) were outdoor smokers at follow up. The proportion of children with urinary cotinine values of >6 ng/ml had decreased. Conclusion: The intensified tobacco prevention in CHC improved smoking parents' ability to protect their children from ETS exposure.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79330 (URN)10.1186/1471-2431-13-76 (DOI)000319288100001 ()
Available from: 2012-07-10 Created: 2012-07-10 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Jangland, E., Becker, D., Börjeson, S., Doherty, C., Gimm, O., Griffith, P., . . . Yngman-Uhlin, P. (2013). The development of a Swedish Nurse Practitioner Program - a request from clinicians and a process supported by US experience. Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, 4(2), 38-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The development of a Swedish Nurse Practitioner Program - a request from clinicians and a process supported by US experience
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 38-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High nursing turnover and a shortage of nurses in acute hospital settings in Sweden challenge health care systems to deliver and ensure safe care. Advanced nursing roles implemented in other countries have offered nurses new career opportunities and had positive effects on patient safety, effectiveness of care, and patient satisfaction. The advanced nursing position of Nurse Practitioner has existed for many years in the United States, while similar extended nursing roles and changes in the scope of nursing practice are being developed in many other countries. In line with this international trend, the role of Nurse Practitioner in surgical care has been proposed for Sweden, and a master’s programme for Acute Nurse Practitioners has been in development for many years. To optimize and facilitate the introduction of this new nursing role and its supporting programme, we elicited the experiences and support of the group who developed a Nurse Practitioner programme for a university in the US. This paper describes this collaboration and sharing of experiences during the process of developing a Swedish Nurse Practitioner programme. We also discuss the challenges of implement- ting any new nursing role in any national health care system. We would like to share our collaborative experiences and thoughts for the future and to open further national and international dialogue about how best to expand the scope of practice for nurses in acute hospital care, and thereby to improve patient care in Sweden and elsewhere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciedu Press, 2013
Keywords
Nurse Practitioner, Education, Implementation, Collaboration, Surgical care
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97954 (URN)10.5430/jnep.v4n2p38 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-09-23 Created: 2013-09-23 Last updated: 2018-04-25Bibliographically approved
Byström, I., Hollén, E., Fälth-Magnusson, K. & Johansson, A. (2012). Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents with Celiac Disease: From the Perspectives of Children and Parents. Gastroenterology Research and Practice, 2012
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-Related Quality of Life in Children and Adolescents with Celiac Disease: From the Perspectives of Children and Parents
2012 (English)In: Gastroenterology Research and Practice, ISSN 1687-6121, E-ISSN 1687-630X, Vol. 2012Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. To examine how celiac children and adolescents on gluten-free diet valued their health-related quality of life, and if age and severity of the disease at onset affected the childrens self-valuation later in life. We also assessed the parents valuation of their childs quality of life. Methods. The DISABKIDS Chronic generic measure, short versions for both children and parents, was used on 160 families with celiac disease. A paediatric gastroenterologist classified manifestations of the disease at onset retrospectively. Results. Age or sex did not influence the outcome. Children diagnosed before the age of five scored higher than children diagnosed later. Children diagnosed more than eight years ago scored higher than more recently diagnosed children, and children who had the classical symptoms of the disease at onset scored higher than those who had atypical symptoms or were asymptomatic. The parents valuated their childrens quality of life as lower than the children did. Conclusion. Health-related quality of life in treated celiac children and adolescents was influenced by age at diagnosis, disease severity at onset, and years on gluten-free diet. The disagreement between child-parent valuations highlights the importance of letting the children themselves be heard about their perceived quality of life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2012
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-86568 (URN)10.1155/2012/986475 (DOI)000303754600001 ()
Available from: 2012-12-19 Created: 2012-12-19 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Alehagen, S., Finnström, O., Hermansson, G., Somasunduram, K., Bangal, V., Patil, A., . . . Johansson, A. (2012). Nurse-based antenatal and child health care in rural India, implementation and effects - an Indian-Swedish collaboration. Rural and remote health, 12(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse-based antenatal and child health care in rural India, implementation and effects - an Indian-Swedish collaboration
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2012 (English)In: Rural and remote health, ISSN 1445-6354, Vol. 12, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION:

Improving maternal and child health care are two of the Millennium Development Goals of the World Health Organization. India is one of the countries worldwide most burdened by maternal and child deaths. The aim of the study was to describe how families participate in nurse-based antenatal and child health care, and the effect of this in relation to referrals to specialist care, institutional deliveries and mortality.

METHODS:

The intervention took place in a remote rural area in India and was influenced by Swedish nurse-based health care. A baseline survey was performed before the intervention commenced. The intervention included education program for staff members with a model called Training of Trainers and the establishment of clinics as both primary health centers and mobile clinics. Health records and manuals, and informational and educational materials were produced and the clinics were equipped with easily handled instruments. The study period was between 2006 and 2009. Data were collected from antenatal care and child healthcare records. The Chi-square test was used to analyze mortality differences between years. A focus group discussion and a content analysis were performed.

RESULTS:

Families' participation increased which led to more check-ups of pregnant women and small children. Antenatal visits before 16 weeks among pregnant women increased from 32 to 62% during the period. Women having at least three check-ups during pregnancy increased from 30 to 60%. Maternal mortality decreased from 478 to 121 per 100 000 live births. The total numbers of children examined in the project increased from approximately 6000 to 18 500 children. Infant mortality decreased from 80 to 43 per 1000 live births. Women and children referred to specialist care increased considerably and institutional deliveries increased from 47 to 74%.

CONCLUSION:

These results suggest that it is possible in a rural and remote area to influence peoples' awareness of the value of preventive health care. The results also indicate that this might decrease maternal and child mortality. The education led to a more patient-friendly encounter between health professionals and patients.

Keywords
India, infant mortality, institutional deliveries, maternal mortality, MDG 4 and 5, prevention, training of trainers.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84262 (URN)000318412500028 ()22998337 (PubMedID)
Note

Article No. 2140

Funding Agencies|Pravara Medical Trust, India||Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, Sweden||Linkoping University||County Council in Ostergotland, Sweden||

Available from: 2012-10-03 Created: 2012-10-03 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Wennerholm, C., Grip, B., Johansson, A., Nilsson, H., Honkasalo, M.-L. & Faresjö, T. (2011). Cardiovascular disease occurrence in two close but different social environments. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH GEOGRAPHICS, 10(5)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cardiovascular disease occurrence in two close but different social environments
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2011 (English)In: INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH GEOGRAPHICS, ISSN 1476-072X, Vol. 10, no 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Cardiovascular diseases estimate to be the leading cause of death and loss of disability-adjusted life years globally. Conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases only partly account for the social gradient. The purpose of this study was to compare the occurrence of the most frequent cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular mortality in two close cities, the Twin cities. Methods: We focused on the total population in two neighbour and equally sized cities with a population of around 135 000 inhabitants each. These twin cities represent two different social environments in the same Swedish county. According to their social history they could be labelled a "blue-collar" and a "white-collar" city. Morbidity data for the two cities was derived from an administrative health care register based on medical records assigned by the physicians at both hospitals and primary care. The morbidity data presented are cumulative incidence rates and the data on mortality for ischemic heart diseases is based on official Swedish statistics. Results: The cumulative incidence of different cardiovascular diagnoses for younger and also elderly men and women revealed significantly differences for studied cardiovascular diagnoses. The occurrence rates were in all aspects highest in the population of the "blue-collar" twin city for both sexes. Conclusions: This study revealed that there are significant differences in risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality between the populations in the studied different social environments. These differences seem to be profound and stable over time and thereby give implication for public health policy to initiate a community intervention program in the "blue-collar" twin city.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-66880 (URN)10.1186/1476-072X-10-5 (DOI)000286525800001 ()
Note
Original Publication: Carina Wennerholm, Björn Grip, AnnaKarin Johansson, Hans Nilsson, Marja-Liisa Honkasalo and Tomas Faresjö, Cardiovascular disease occurrence in two close but different social environments, 2011, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF HEALTH GEOGRAPHICS, (10), 5. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1476-072X-10-5 Licensee: BioMed Central http://www.biomedcentral.com/Available from: 2011-03-22 Created: 2011-03-21 Last updated: 2017-09-18
Alehagen, S., Hägg, M., Kalén-Enterlöv, M. & Johansson, A. (2011). Experiences of community health nurses regarding father participation in child health care. Journal of Child Health Care, 15(3), 153-162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of community health nurses regarding father participation in child health care
2011 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 153-162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Traditionally child health care (CHC) has been an arena where mothers and nurses meet, but in recent years fathers are entering CHC with increasing frequency. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences of fathers’ participation in CHC. Nine Swedish nurses working in CHC were interviewed and asked to give a description of their experiences from meetings with fathers in CHC. Phenomenology according to Giorgi was used for the analysis and the essence of the findings was that father participation was seen from the perspective of mother participation and was constantly compared to mother participation in CHC. The essence is explicated in the following themes: participation through activities; equal participation although diverse; influence of structures in society; and strengthening participation. Clinical implications include the need for creating a separate identity in CHC for fathers and more communication directed at fathers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Sage Publications Ltd., 2011
Keywords
child health care; father; nurses’ experiences; participation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70813 (URN)10.1177/1367493511403952 (DOI)000296072100001 ()
Available from: 2011-09-19 Created: 2011-09-19 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Wennerholm, C., Jern, M., Johansson, A. & Faresjö, T. (2011). How Could Cardiovascular Disease Occurrence Be so Different in Two Close Cities?. Paper presented at 9th International Congress on Coronary Artery Disease, October 23-26, 2011,Venice, Italy.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Could Cardiovascular Disease Occurrence Be so Different in Two Close Cities?
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: The leading cause of death and loss of disability-adjusted life years globally are cardiovascular diseases. Conventional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases only partly account for the social gradient. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence of common cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular mortality in defined populations in two geographical close but socially different cities, a white-collar and a blue-collar twin city - “The Twincities”.

Methods: We focused on the total population in these two neighbouring and equally sized cities with a population of around 135 000 inhabitants respectively, representing two close but different social environments in the same Swedish county. Data about morbidity for the two cities was derived from an administrative health care register based on medical records assigned by the physicians at both hospitals and primary care and calculated as cumulative incidence rates. Mortality for ischemic heart diseases is based on official Swedish national statistics.

Results: The cumulative incidence of cardiovascular diagnoses for younger as well as elderly men and women revealed significant differences between these two cities. The relative risks for both sexes were highest for all cardiovascular diagnosis studied and cardiovascular mortality in the population of the blue-collar twin city.

Conclusions: There are major differences in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality between the studied twin cities representing two close but different social environments. Since these differences seem to be profound and stable over time preventive measures is warranted in the blue-collar city.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70795 (URN)
Conference
9th International Congress on Coronary Artery Disease, October 23-26, 2011,Venice, Italy
Available from: 2011-09-19 Created: 2011-09-19 Last updated: 2013-09-05
Carlsson, N., Johansson, A., Hermansson, G. & Andersson-Gäre, B. (2011). Parents' attitudes to smoking and passive smoking and their experience of the tobacco preventive work in child health care. Journal of Child Health Care, 15(4), 272-286
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents' attitudes to smoking and passive smoking and their experience of the tobacco preventive work in child health care
2011 (English)In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 272-286Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this study was to describe parents' attitudes to smoking and their experience of the tobacco preventive work in antenatal care and in Child Health Care (CHC) in Sweden. A population based survey in which 62 percent of 3000 randomly selected parents with 1- and 3-year-old children answered a questionnaire. Fifty-six percent stated that smoking was registered in the health record of the child yet no further discussion regarding passive smoking took place. The parents' educational level and smoking status was related to the attitudes and experiences of the tobacco preventive work. The results indicated that the dialogue with parents regarding children and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure has to be redesigned and intensified in order to meet the needs of parents with different backgrounds.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2011
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73547 (URN)10.1177/1367493510382243 (DOI)000299562500004 ()
Available from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2017-12-08
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