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Wirestam, L., Enocsson, H., Skogh, T., Padyukov, L., Jonsen, A., Urowitz, M. B., . . . Sjöwall, C. (2019). Osteopontin and Disease Activity in Patients with Recent-onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Results from the SLICC Inception Cohort. Journal of Rheumatology, 46(5), 492-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Osteopontin and Disease Activity in Patients with Recent-onset Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Results from the SLICC Inception Cohort
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 492-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. In cross-sectional studies, elevated osteopontin (OPN) levels have been proposed to reflect, and/or precede, progressive organ damage and disease severity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We aimed, in a cohort of patients with recent-onset SLE, to determine whether raised serum OPN levels precede damage and/or are associated with disease activity or certain disease phenotypes. Methods. We included 344 patients from the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) Inception Cohort who had 5 years of followup data available. All patients fulfilled the 1997 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. Baseline sera from patients and from age-and sex-matched population-based controls were analyzed for OPN using ELISA. Disease activity and damage were assessed at each annual followup visit using the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and the SLICC/ACR damage index (SDI), respectively. Results. Compared to controls, baseline OPN was raised 4-fold in SLE cases (p amp;lt; 0.0001). After relevant adjustments in a binary logistic regression model, OPN levels failed to significantly predict global damage accrual defined as SDI amp;gt;= 1 at 5 years. However, baseline OPN correlated with SLEDAI-2K at enrollment into the cohort (r = 0.27, p amp;lt; 0.0001), and patients with high disease activity (SLEDAI-2K amp;gt;= 5) had raised serum OPN (p amp;lt; 0.0001). In addition, higher OPN levels were found in patients with persistent disease activity (p = 0.0006), in cases with renal involvement (p amp;lt; 0.0001) and impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (p = 0.01). Conclusion. The performance of OPN to predict development of organ damage was not impressive. However, OPN associated significantly with lupus nephritis and with raised disease activity at enrollment, as well as over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
J RHEUMATOL PUBL CO, 2019
Keywords
SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS; BIOMARKERS; OSTEOPONTIN; DISEASE ACTIVITY; ORGAN DAMAGE; PROGNOSIS
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-156906 (URN)10.3899/jrheum.180713 (DOI)000466402600010 ()30647177 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Rheumatism Association; County Council of Ostergotland; Swedish Society of Medicine; King Gustaf V and Queen Victorias Freemasons foundation; King Gustaf Vs 80-year anniversary foundation; Hanyang University [201600000001387]; Lupus UK; NIHR/Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility; US National Institutes of Health (NIH) [AR43727]; Singer Family Fund for Lupus Research; Arthritis Research UK; NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre; NIHR/Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility at Manchester University National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust; Danish Rheumatism Association [A1028]; NIH [RR00046]

Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-06-18
Wirestam, L., Frodlund, M., Enocsson, H., Skogh, T., Wetterö, J. & Sjöwall, C. (2017). Osteopontin is associated with disease severity and antiphospholipid syndrome in well characterised Swedish cases of SLE. Lupus Science and Medicine, 4(1), Article ID 000225.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Osteopontin is associated with disease severity and antiphospholipid syndrome in well characterised Swedish cases of SLE
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2017 (English)In: Lupus Science and Medicine, ISSN 2053-8790, E-ISSN 1625-9823, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 7article id 000225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective The variety of disease phenotypes among patients with SLE challenges the identification of new biomarkers reflecting disease activity and/or organ damage. Osteopontin (OPN) is an extracellular matrix protein with immunomodulating properties. Although raised levels have been reported, the pathogenic implications and clinical utility of OPN as a biomarker in SLE are far from clear. Thus, the aim of this study was to characterise OPN in SLE.

Methods Sera from 240 well-characterised adult SLE cases classified according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and/or the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) criteria, and 240 population-based controls were immunoassayed for OPN. The SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) was used to evaluate disease activity and the SLICC/ACR Damage Index (SDI) to detect damage accrual.

Results Serum OPN levels were in average raised fourfold in SLE cases compared with the controls (p<0.0001). OPN correlated with SLEDAI-2K, especially in patients with a disease duration of <12 months (r=0.666, p=0.028). OPN was highly associated with SDI (p<0.0001), especially in the renal (p<0.0001), cardiovascular (p<0.0001) and malignancy (p=0.012) domains. Finally, OPN associated with coherent antiphospholipid syndrome (APS; p=0.009), and both clinical and laboratory criteria of APS had significant positive impact on OPN levels.

Conclusions In this cross-sectional study, circulating OPN correlates with disease activity in recent-onset SLE, reflects global organ damage and associates with APS. Longitudinal studies to dissect whether serum OPN also precedes and predicts future organ damage are most warranted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2017. p. 7
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity Neurology Clinical Laboratory Medicine Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140711 (URN)10.1136/lupus-2017-000225 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-09-08 Created: 2017-09-08 Last updated: 2017-09-08Bibliographically approved
Roos, K., Martinsson, K., Ziegelasch, M., Sommarin, Y., Svärd, A., Skogh, T. & Kastbom, A. (2016). Circulating secretory IgA antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides in early rheumatoid arthritis associate with inflammatory activity and smoking. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 18(119)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating secretory IgA antibodies against cyclic citrullinated peptides in early rheumatoid arthritis associate with inflammatory activity and smoking
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2016 (English)In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 18, no 119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A possible association between mucosal immunization and inflammation, as well as the initiation and propagation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), is attracting renewed interest. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible occurrence and clinical correlations of circulating secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) antibodies against the second-generation cyclic citrullinated peptides (CCP) among patients with recent-onset RA followed prospectively over 3 years. Methods: Baseline serum samples from 636 patients with recent-onset RA were analyzed for SIgA anti-CCP antibodies by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a secondary antibody directed against secretory component. SIgA anti-CCP status at baseline was analyzed in relation to smoking, HLA-DRB1/shared epitope (SE), and the disease course over 3 years. Significant findings were evaluated in regression analysis that included age, sex, smoking, and SE. Results: Seventeen percent of the patients tested positive for circulating SIgA anti-CCP, and the occurrence was confirmed by detection of secretory component in an affinity-purified IgA anti-CCP fraction. SIgA anti-CCP positivity at baseline was associated with slightly higher baseline erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (mean 38 vs. 31 mm/first hour, p = 0.004) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (mean 30 vs. 23 mg/L, p = 0.047). During follow-up, SIgA anti-CCP-positive patients had a higher mean AUC regarding ESR (adjusted p = 0.003), although there were no significant differences regarding CRP, tender and swollen joint counts, or radiological joint damage (median Larsen progression 1.0 vs. 1.0, p = 0.22). SIgA anti-CCP was associated significantly with smoking (79 % ever smokers among SIgA anti-CCP-positive patients vs. 59 % in SIgA anti-CCP-negative patients, adjusted OR 2.19, 95 % CI 1.01-4.37, p = 0.027) but not with carriage of the SE (80 % vs. 73 %, p = 0.62). Conclusions: Circulating SIgA anti-CCP, which is present in a subgroup of patients with early RA, is not related to SE, but it is environmentally linked to cigarette smoking. This finding strengthens the hypothesis that immunization against citrullinated peptides and/or proteins may occur at mucosal surfaces of the airways. Analysis of SIgA antibodies in serum may be a convenient and more versatile means to investigate the "mucosal connection" in RA compared with analyses in mucosal fluid samples.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2016
Keywords
Rheumatoid arthritis; Anticitrullinated protein antibodies; Secretory immunoglobulin A; Mucosal immunity
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-129493 (URN)10.1186/s13075-016-1014-1 (DOI)000376373100001 ()27215344 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|King Gustav Vs 80-year Foundation; Swedish Medical Society; Reinhold Sund Foundation; Ostergotland County Council

Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Sandin, C., Eriksson, P., Segelmark, M., Skogh, T. & Kastbom, A. (2016). IgA- and SIgA anti-PR3 antibodies in serum versus organ involvement and disease activity in PR3-ANCA associated vasculitis.. Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 184(2), 208-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>IgA- and SIgA anti-PR3 antibodies in serum versus organ involvement and disease activity in PR3-ANCA associated vasculitis.
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2016 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Immunology, ISSN 0009-9104, E-ISSN 1365-2249, Vol. 184, no 2, p. 208-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Circulating IgA class anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) directed against proteinase 3 (PR3) have been reported in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with mucosal involvement. However, secretory IgA (SIgA) PR3-ANCA has not been reported previously. In this study we compared serum levels of SIgA PR3-ANCA and IgA PR3-ANCA with IgG PR3-ANCA in relation to disease characteristics. Among 73 patients with AAV and PR3-ANCA at diagnosis, 84% tested positive for IgG PR3-ANCA, 47% for IgA-ANCA and 36% for SIgA PR3-ANCA at the time of sampling for the present study. IgA and IgG PR3-ANCA were similarly represented among patients with different organ manifestations, i.e. upper airway, lung or kidney at time of sampling. However, SIgA PR3-ANCA was significantly less represented among patients with upper airway involvement. During active disease, the proportions of IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA positive patients were significantly higher as compared to inactive disease. Eight patients were prospectively sampled during 24 months from onset of active disease. In these patients, IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA more often turned negative after remission induction as compared to IgG PR3-ANCA. Our findings suggest that serum IgA PR3-ANCA and SIgA PR3-ANCA are more closely related to disease activity in AAV as compared to IgG PR3-ANCA. Further studies are required to reveal if this has implications for disease activity monitoring. The mean number of PR3-ANCA isotypes increased along with disease activity, suggesting a global B-cell activation during active disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016
Keywords
ANCA-associated vasculitis; IgA PR3-ANCA; Mucosal immunity; disease activity
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-125664 (URN)10.1111/cei.12769 (DOI)000374689500007 ()26762653 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies:  Swedish Society of Medicine; Reinhold Sund foundation for Rheumatology Research; Swedish Association against Rheumatism; Ostergotland County Council

Available from: 2016-02-29 Created: 2016-02-29 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Wirestam, L., Schierbeck, H., Skogh, T., Gunnarsson, I., Ottosson, L., Erlandsson-Harris, H., . . . Sjöwall, C. (2015). Antibodies against High Mobility Group Box protein-1 (HMGB1) versus other anti-nuclear antibody fine-specificities and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 17(338)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibodies against High Mobility Group Box protein-1 (HMGB1) versus other anti-nuclear antibody fine-specificities and disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus
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2015 (English)In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 17, no 338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The non-histone nuclear protein high mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1) is typically associated with nucleosomes, but may shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, and under some conditions also be released extracellularly and participate in systemic inflammation. Monoclonal HMGB1-targeting antibodies can ameliorate murine polyarthritis and lupus-like disease. Interestingly, autoantibodies against HMGB1 have also been described in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but their clinical implications remain elusive. The main aims of this study were to detect serum anti-HMGB1 antibodies in patients with SLE and relate them to other types of antinuclear antibodies (ANA), and to disease activity. Methods: 188 Swedish SLE patients meeting the 1982 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria and/or the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics classification criteria participated in the study. Anti-HMGB1 antibody levels were analysed in patient and control (n = 112) sera by an in-house ELISA using recombinant histidine-tagged HMGB1. SLE sera were also analysed for ANA by immunofluorescence (IF) microscopy (IF-ANA) using fixed HEp-2 cells, and by a line-blot assay for antigen fine-specificities. To quantify antibodies to double-stranded DNA, a fluoroenzyme-immunoassay was employed. Results: At inclusion, 23 % of the SLE patients were anti-HMGB1 antibody positive compared to 5 % of the controls. Anti-HMGB1 antibodies occurred in 49 % of the IF-ANA positive SLE patients, and in 34 % of IF-ANA negative cases (p = 0.004). Levels of anti-HMGB1 antibodies correlated with anti-dsDNA antibody levels (r = 0.49; p less than 0.001). Significant, but less pronounced correlations were found regarding anti-HMGB1 and SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI-2K: r = 0.15; p = 0.04), classical complement function (r = -0.24; p = 0.002) and complement protein C4 (r = -0.23; p = 0.002). Average anti-HMGB1 antibody levels were significantly higher among patients with homogenous +/- other IF-ANA staining patterns (median 180 AU) compared to IF-ANA negative cases (median 83 AU) (p = 0.004). Rabbit anti-HMGB1 antibodies gave rise to cytoplasmic, but not nuclear, staining of HEp-2 cells. Conclusions: We confirm that anti-HMGB1 antibodies are common in SLE and correlate with disease activity variables. Although anti-HMGB1 antibodies measured by ELISA often coincide with nuclear IF-ANA staining, our results indicate that anti-HMGB1 antibodies do not give rise to nuclear staining of the predominantly used commercial HEp-2 cell slides.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, 2015
Keywords
HMGB1; Autoantibodies; SLE; Antinuclear antibodies; Inflammation; Clinical phenotype; Complement proteins
National Category
Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123521 (URN)10.1186/s13075-015-0856-2 (DOI)000365252900001 ()26596890 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Society for Medical Research, Region Ostergotland; Swedish Research Council; Swedish Rheumatism Association; Swedish Society of Medicine; Professor Nanna Svartz foundation; King Gustaf Vs 80-year foundation

Available from: 2015-12-22 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2018-01-10
Ighe, A., Dahlström, Ö., Skogh, T. & Sjöwall, C. (2015). Application of the 2012 systemic lupus international collaborating clinics classification criteria to patients on a Regional Swedish systemic lupus erythematosus register. Arthritis Research & Therapy, 17, Article ID 3.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Application of the 2012 systemic lupus international collaborating clinics classification criteria to patients on a Regional Swedish systemic lupus erythematosus register
2015 (English)In: Arthritis Research & Therapy, ISSN 1478-6354, E-ISSN 1478-6362, Vol. 17, article id 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction

In 2012, the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) network presented a new set of criteria (SLICC-12) to classify systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The present study is the first to evaluate the performance of SLICC-12 in an adult European study population. Thus, SLICC-12 criteria were applied to confirmed SLE cases in our regional SLE register as well as to individuals with a fair suspicion of systemic autoimmune disease who were referred to rheumatology specialists at our unit.     

Methods

We included 243 confirmed SLE patients who met the 1982 American College of Rheumatology (ACR-82) classification criteria and/or the Fries ‘diagnostic principle’ (presence  of antinuclear antibodies on at least one occasion plus involvement of at least two defined organ systems) and 55 controls with possible systemic autoimmune disease, including the presence of any SLE-related autoantibody.     

Results

SLICC-12 showed a diagnostic sensitivity of 94% (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.90 to 0.96) compared with 90% (95% CI, 0.85 to 0.93) for the updated set of ACR criteria from 1997 (ACR-97), whereas ACR-82 failed to identify every fifth true SLE case. However, the disease specificity of SLICC-12 reached only 74% (95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84) and did not change much when involvement of at least two different organs was required as an indicator of systemic disease. In addition, SLICC-12 misclassified more of the controls compared to ACR-82, ACR-97 and Fries.     

Conclusions

Establishing a standard definition of SLE continues to challenge lupus researchers and clinicians. We confirm that SLICC-12 has advantages with regard to diagnostic sensitivity, whereas we found the diagnostic specificity to be surprisingly low. To accomplish increased sensitivity and specificity figures, a combination of criteria sets for clinical SLE studies should be considered.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114616 (URN)10.1186/s13075-015-0521-9 (DOI)000351571900001 ()25575961 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-02-27 Created: 2015-02-27 Last updated: 2018-04-07
Svärd, A., Skogh, T., Alfredsson, L., Ilar, A., Klareskog, L., Bengtsson, C. & Kastbom, A. (2015). Associations to smoking and shared epitope differ between IgA and IgG class antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides in early rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis & Rheumatology, 67(8), 2032-2037
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations to smoking and shared epitope differ between IgA and IgG class antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptides in early rheumatoid arthritis
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2015 (English)In: Arthritis & Rheumatology, ISSN 2326-5191, E-ISSN 2326-5205, Vol. 67, no 8, p. 2032-2037Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Smoking and HLA-DRB1/shared epitope (SE) are well-known interacting risk factors for developing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with IgG anticitrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA). It remains unknown to what extent SE-genes and smoking associate with mucosal immune responses.

Objectives This study was done to explore relations between cigarette smoking habits and SE versus circulating IgA and IgG anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP) among early RA patients.

Methods Patients from two early-RA cohorts were analysed, EIRA-1 (n=1663) and TIRA-2 (n=199). The patients were grouped into four subsets based on anti-CCP: IgG-/IgA-, IgG-/IgA+, IgG+/IgA- and IgG+/IgA+. Interaction between smoking and SE was calculated by the attributable proportion due to deviation from additivity. Analyzed controls (n=1100) were randomly selected from the EIRA-1 study base.

Results Anti-CCP occurrence was similar in the two cohorts. Only in EIRA was IgA anti-CCP detected alone in a minority of cases (3%). Smoking was significantly overrepresented among IgA anti-CCP+ patients with or without IgG-class anti-CCP, but not with IgG anti-CCP alone. Presence of SE genes was overrepresented among IgG anti-CCP+ patients with or without IgA-class anti-CCP, but not with IgA anti-CCP alone. Smoking and SE interacted regarding the risk of IgG+/IgA+ RA (AP=0.5, 95 % CI=0.4-0.6), whereas no significant interaction was observed regarding IgG-/IgA+ or IgG+/IgA- RA.

Conclusions Association between cigarette smoking and anti-CCP is limited to cases with IgA-class antibodies in addition to IgG anti-CCP. This suggests a causal relation between chronic mucosal irritation/inflammation, induction of a systemic IgA anti-CCP response and subsequent development of RA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2015
Keywords
Rheumatoid arthritis, immunoglobulin A, ACPA, smoking, shared epitope
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105986 (URN)10.1002/art.39170 (DOI)000358609300007 ()
Note

At the defence date the status of this publication was Manuscript.

Supported by the Centre for Clinical Research-Dalarna, the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish Association Against Rheumatism, King Gustaf V's 80-Year Foundation, the County Council of Ostergotland, the Reinhold Sund Foundation, the Swedish Society of Medicine, the Medical Research County Council of South-East Sweden, the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare, AFA Insurance, the Swedish Rheumatic Foundation, and the Innovative Medicines Initiative (BTCure).

Available from: 2014-04-15 Created: 2014-04-15 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Hallert, E., Husberg, M., Kalkan, A., Rahmqvist, M., Skogh, T. & Bernfort, L. (2015). Changes in sociodemographic characteristics at baseline in two Swedish cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed 1996-98 and 2006-09. Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, 44(2), 100-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in sociodemographic characteristics at baseline in two Swedish cohorts of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed 1996-98 and 2006-09
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2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 100-105Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To compare baseline sociodemographic characteristics in two rheumatoid arthritis (RA) cohorts enrolled 10 years apart, and to examine differences with respect to the general population. Method: Clinical and sociodemographic data were collected in 320 early RA patients during 1996-98 (TIRA-1) and 467 patients in 2006-09 (TIRA-2). Multivariate logistic regression tests were performed and intercohort comparisons were related to general population data, obtained from official databases. Results: TIRA-2 patients were older than TIRA-1 (58 vs. 56 years). Women (both cohorts, 67%) were younger than men in TIRA-1 (55 vs. 59 years) and in TIRA-2 (57 vs. 61 years). Disease activity was similar but TIRA-2 women scored worse pain and worse on the HAQ. Approximately 73% were cohabiting, in both cohorts and in the general population. Education was higher in TIRA-2 than in TIRA-2 but still lower than in the general population. Women had consistently higher education than men. Education was associated with age, younger patients having higher education. In both cohorts, lower education was associated with increased disability pension and increased sick leave. Sick leave was lower in TIRA-2 than in TIRA-1 (37% vs. 50%) but disability pension was higher (16% vs. 10%). In TIRA-1, 9% of women had disability pension compared with 17% in TIRA-2. A similar decrease in sick leave and an increase in disability pension were also seen in the general population. Older age and a higher HAQ score were associated with increased sick leave and being in the TIRA-2 cohort was associated with decreased sick leave. Conclusions: TIRA-2 patients were slightly older, better educated, had lower sick leave and higher disability pension than those in TIRA-1. Similar changes were seen simultaneously in the general population. Belonging to the TIRA-2 cohort was associated with decreased sick leave, indicating that societal changes are of importance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-117271 (URN)10.3109/03009742.2014.930926 (DOI)000351182100003 ()25352338 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Norrbacka-Eugenia Foundation; Medical Research County Council of South-East Sweden (FORSS); County Council in Ostergotland; Swedish Rheumatism Association

Available from: 2015-04-22 Created: 2015-04-21 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Enocsson, H., Sjöwall, C., Wirestam, L., Dahle, C., Kastbom, A., Ronnelid, J., . . . Skogh, T. (2015). Four Anti-dsDNA Antibody Assays in Relation to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Specificity and Activity. Journal of Rheumatology, 42(5), 817-825
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Four Anti-dsDNA Antibody Assays in Relation to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Specificity and Activity
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0315-162X, E-ISSN 1499-2752, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 817-825Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. Analysis of antibodies against dsDNA is an important diagnostic tool for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and changes in anti-dsDNA antibody levels are also used to assess disease activity. Herein, 4 assays were compared with regard to SLE specificity, sensitivity, and association with disease activity variables. Methods. Cross-sectional sera from 178 patients with SLE, of which 11 were followed consecutively, from a regional Swedish SLE register were analyzed for immunoglobulin G (IgG) anti-dsDNA by bead-based multiplex assay (FIDIS; Theradig), fluoroenzyme-immunoassay (EliA; Phadia/Thermo Fisher Scientific), Crithidia luciliae immunofluorescence test (CLIFT; ImmunoConcepts), and line blot (EUROLINE; Euroimmun). All patients with SLE fulfilled the 1982 American College of Rheumatology and/or the 2012 Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC-12) classification criteria. Healthy individuals (n = 100), patients with rheumatoid arthritis (n = 95), and patients with primary Sjogren syndrome (n = 54) served as controls. Results. CLIFT had the highest SLE specificity (98%) whereas EliA had the highest sensitivity (35%). When cutoff levels for FIDIS, EliA, and EUROLINE were adjusted according to SLICC-12 (i.e., double the reference limit when using ELISA), the specificity and sensitivity of FIDIS was comparable to CLIFT. FIDIS and CLIFT also showed the highest concordance (84%). FIDIS performed best regarding association with disease activity in cross-sectional and consecutive samples. Fishers exact test revealed striking differences between methods regarding associations with certain disease phenotypes. Conclusion. CLIFT remains a good choice for diagnostic purposes, but FIDIS performs equally well when the cutoff is adjusted according to SLICC-12. Based on results from cross-sectional and consecutive analyses, FIDIS can also be recommended to monitor disease activity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Journal of Rheumatology, 2015
Keywords
SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS; DOUBLE-STRANDED DNA; IMMUNOASSAY; AUTOANTIBODIES; INFLAMMATION; RHEUMATIC DISEASE
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118866 (URN)10.3899/jrheum.140677 (DOI)000353779400013 ()25684763 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Research Council [K2012-69X-14594-10-3, K2011-68X-20611-04-3]; Swedish Society for Medicine [SLS-331171]; Swedish Society Against Rheumatism [R-313701, R-307291]; Swedish Society for Medical Research; King Gustaf V 80-year Foundation [FAI2013-0066]; Professor Nanna Svartz foundation

Available from: 2015-06-08 Created: 2015-06-04 Last updated: 2018-11-07
Kalkan, A., Husberg, M., Hallert, E., Roback, K., Thyberg, I., Skogh, T. & Carlsson, P. (2015). Physician Preferences and Variations in Prescription of Biologic Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Register-Based Study of 4,010 Patients in Sweden. Arthritis care & research, 67(12), 1679-1685
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physician Preferences and Variations in Prescription of Biologic Drugs for Rheumatoid Arthritis: A Register-Based Study of 4,010 Patients in Sweden
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2015 (English)In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 67, no 12, p. 1679-1685Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. The prescription of biologic drugs for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients has varied considerably across different regions. Previous studies have shown physician preferences to be an important determinant in the decision to select biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) rather than nonbiologic, synthetic DMARDs (sDMARDs) alone. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that physician preferences are an important determinant for prescribing bDMARDs for RA patients in Sweden. Methods. Using data from the Swedish Rheumatology Quality Register, we identified 4,010 RA patients who were not prescribed bDMARDs during the period 2008-2012, but who, on at least 1 occasion, had an sDMARD prescription and changed treatment for the first time to either a new sDMARD or a bDMARD. Physician preference for the use of bDMARDs was calculated using data on each physicians prescriptions during the study period. The relationship between prescription of a bDMARD and physician preference, controlling for patient characteristics, disease activity, and the physicians local context was evaluated using multivariate logistic regression. Results. When adjusting for patient characteristics, disease activity, and the physicians local context, physician preference was an important predictor for prescription of bDMARDs. Compared with patients of a physician in the lowest preference tertile, patients of physicians in the highest and middle tertiles had an odds ratio for receiving bDMARDs of 2.8 (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 2.13-3.68) and 1.28 (95% CI 1.05-1.57), respectively. Conclusion. Physician preference is an important determinant for prescribing bDMARDs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124498 (URN)10.1002/acr.22640 (DOI)000367681900008 ()26097219 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Norrbacka-Eugenia Foundation; Swedish Rheumatism Association

Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0153-9249

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