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Glendor , Ulf
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Publications (10 of 12) Show all publications
Glendor, U. (2013). Attitudes towards the use of mouth and face guards in Swedish ice hockey: part 2. Results. Dental Traumatology, 29(6), 432-444
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes towards the use of mouth and face guards in Swedish ice hockey: part 2. Results
2013 (English)In: Dental Traumatology, ISSN 1600-4469, E-ISSN 1600-9657, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 432-444Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/AimThe yearly cost of sports injuries, which affects Swedish society, is estimated to 3billion SEK (460 million USD). Injuries in ice hockey represent at least 270 million SEK (42 million USD). Despite the high number of injuries, mouth and face guards are rarely used in Swedish ice hockey. The major aim of this study was to examine the attitudes of mouth and face guards in two ice hockey clubs in Sweden (one elite and one division 3 club). A second purpose was to determine why some players use mouth and face guards, while others do not. A third goal was to present a material that ice hockey clubs could use for further discussions. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterials and methodA phenomenographic analysis of focus groups interviews. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResultsThe phenomenographic analysis of the data resulted in 12 categories. Within each category, issues, activities and engagement of the participants were described. Further, similarities and differences in the discussions between the elite club and the division 3 club were described. The following categories were found to engage the participants the most: Ice hockey is a high-velocity collision sport in which injuries are expected, Attitudes towards personal protection guards and Suggested measures. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusionsThe participants were aware of the risk of playing ice hockey, but they know little about the consequences of a dental injury. Although ice hockey players wish to protect themselves, they refuse to accept just any mouth or face guard. Through the discussions about reducing dental and jaw injuries by routine use of protection devices, many reform proposals were presented that could be useful in future discussions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
attitude, dental and jaw injuries, questionnaire, dental or face guards, ice hockey
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102379 (URN)10.1111/edt.12033 (DOI)000326688700002 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|insurance company Folksam||

Available from: 2013-12-09 Created: 2013-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Glendor, U. & Göransson, A. (2013). Attitudes towards the use of mouth and face guards in Swedish ice hockey: part I. Materials and method. Dental Traumatology, 29(5), 355-359
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attitudes towards the use of mouth and face guards in Swedish ice hockey: part I. Materials and method
2013 (English)In: Dental Traumatology, ISSN 1600-4469, E-ISSN 1600-9657, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 355-359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/aimThe most common method to study the use and attitudes of mouth and face guards is a limited number of preprepared questions. This approach, however, risks information restriction and lowers the general value of the study. The aim of this study was therefore to present a phenomenographic approach to capture the use and attitudes towards mouth and face guards in two Swedish ice hockey clubs. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMaterials and methodThe phenomenographic study was set up as 12 focus group interviews: six interviews with one elite and six interviews with one division 3 ice hockey club in Sweden. A number of categories were identified, which became the basis for how the results are presented. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResultsThe participants inspired each other to speak freely, which allowed for much wider and deeper discussions than was expected. In comparison with the use of a preprepared questionnaire with a limited number of questions sent home by post, this method included comments from the participants and revealed new angles of approach in 12 identified categories. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusionsUsing a phenomenographic research method, more variations and different apprehensions could be revealed than what would be possible with a set of preprepared questions sent by post or used in individual interviews.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
Keywords
attitudes, dental, ice hockey, mouth or face protection guards, phenomenographic, qualitative, questionnaire
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-100483 (URN)10.1111/edt.12036 (DOI)000324474200002 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|The insurance company Folksam||

Available from: 2013-11-08 Created: 2013-11-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Magunacelaya, M. B. & Glendor, U. (2011). Surfing for mouth guards: assessing quality of online information. Dental Traumatology, 27(5), 334-343
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Surfing for mouth guards: assessing quality of online information
2011 (English)In: Dental Traumatology, ISSN 1600-4469, E-ISSN 1600-9657, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 334-343Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The Internet is an easily accessible and commonly used source of health-related information, but evaluations of the quality of this information within the dental trauma field are still lacking. Aim: The aims of this study are (i) to present the most current scientific knowledge regarding mouth guards used in sport activities, (ii) to suggest a scoring system to evaluate the quality of information pertaining to mouth guard protection related to World Wide Web sites and (iii) to employ this scoring system when seeking reliable mouth guard-related websites. Materials and methods: First, an Internet search using the keywords athletic injuries/prevention and control and mouth protector or mouth guards in English was performed on PubMed, Cochrane, SvedMed+ and Web of Science to identify scientific knowledge about mouth guards. Second, an Internet search using the keywords consumer health information Internet, Internet information public health and web usage-seeking behaviour was performed on PubMed and Web of Science to obtain scientific articles seeking to evaluate the quality of health information on the Web. Based on the articles found in the second search, two scoring systems were selected. Then, an Internet search using the keywords mouth protector, mouth guards and gum shields in English was performed on the search engines Google, MSN and Yahoo. The websites selected were evaluated for reliability and accuracy. Results: Of the 223 websites retrieved, 39 were designated valid and evaluated. Nine sites scored 22 or higher. The mean total score of the 39 websites was 14.2. Fourteen websites scored higher than the mean total score, and 25 websites scored less. The highest total score, presented by a Public Institution Web site (Health Canada), was 31 from a maximum possible score of 34, and the lowest score was 0. Conclusion: This study shows that there is a high amount of information about mouth guards on the Internet but that the quality of this information varies. It should be the responsibility of health care professionals to suggest and provide reliable Internet URL addresses to patients. In addition, an appropriate search terminology and search strategy should be made available to persons who want to search beyond the recommended sites.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley and Sons, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-71073 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-9657.2011.01017.x (DOI)000294912700003 ()
Available from: 2011-09-30 Created: 2011-09-30 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Glendor , U. (2009). Aetiology and risk factors related to traumatic dental injuries - a review of the literature. DENTAL TRAUMATOLOGY, 25(1), 19-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aetiology and risk factors related to traumatic dental injuries - a review of the literature
2009 (English)In: DENTAL TRAUMATOLOGY, ISSN 1600-4469 , Vol. 25, no 1, p. 19-31Article, review/survey (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

During the past 30 years, the number of aetiologies of traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) has increased dramatically in the literature and now includes a broad spectrum of variables, including oral and environmental factors and human behaviour. The aim of this study is to present an international review of well-known as well as less well-known unintentional and intentional causes of TDIs. Moreover, some models that are useful in investigating contact sport injuries are presented.

The databases of Medline, Cochrane, Social Citation Index, Science Citation Index and CINAHL from 1995 to the present were used.

Oral factors (increased overjet with protrusion), environmental determinants (material deprivation) and human behaviour (risk-taking children, children being bullied, emotionally stressful conditions, obesity and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) were found to increase the risk for TDIs. Other factors increasing the risk for TDIs are presence of illness, learning difficulties, physical limitations and inappropriate use of teeth. A new cause of TDIs that is of particular interest is oral piercing. In traffic facial injury was similar in unrestrained occupants (no seat belts) and occupants restrained only with an air bag. Amateur athletes have been found to suffer from TDIs more often than professional athletes. Falls and collisions mask intentional TDIs, such as physical abuse, assaults and torture. Violence has increased in severity during the past few decades and its role has been underestimated when looking at intentional vs unintentional TDIs. There are useful models to prevent TDIs from occurring in sports. WHO Healthy Cities and WHO Health Promoting Schools Programmes offer a broad solution for dental trauma as a public health problem.

The number of known causes of TDIs has grown to alarming levels, probably because of increased interest of the causes and the underlying complexity of a TDI. Accepted oral, environmental and human aetiological factors must therefore be included in the registration of TDIs.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16737 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-9657.2008.00694.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-02-14 Created: 2009-02-13 Last updated: 2009-02-16
Glendor , U. (2009). Has the education of professional caregivers and lay people in dental trauma care failed?. DENTAL TRAUMATOLOGY, 25(1), 12-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Has the education of professional caregivers and lay people in dental trauma care failed?
2009 (English)In: DENTAL TRAUMATOLOGY, ISSN 1600-4469 , Vol. 25, no 1, p. 12-18Article, review/survey (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Several reports have been published during the past decades showing a lack of care of traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) as well as dentists and lay people having insufficient knowledge on how to manage TDIs. This situation could seriously affect the outcome of TDIs, especially a complicated TDI. The overall aim of this study was to present a review of dental trauma care with focus on treatment and dentists and lay persons lack of knowledge on how to manage a TDI. A further aim is to introduce the actors involved and the outcome of their education.

The databases Medline, Cochrane, SSCI, SCI and CINAHL from the year 1995 to the present were used. Focus was on treatment need, inadequate care, lack of knowledge and poor organization of emergency care.

Studies from different countries demonstrated that treatment needs were not properly met despite the fact that not all untreated teeth needed treatment. Treatment in emergency dental care was often inadequate or inappropriate. With the exception of lay people, teachers, medical personnel and even dentists performed inadequate care. Furthermore, information to the public was insufficient. Despite a low level of knowledge, lay people expressed a strong interest in helping someone with a TDI.

The conclusion from this review is that consideration must be given the problematic results from different studies on education or information about dental trauma care. Despite that the studies reviewed were from different countries and groups of people, the results seem to be consistent, i.e. that a large part of the educational process of professional caregivers and lay people has failed. Too much hope seems to be put on lay people to handle difficult cases such as tooth avulsion. Education of caregivers and lay people is a field where much remains to be explored.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-16736 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-9657.2008.00707.x (DOI)
Available from: 2009-02-14 Created: 2009-02-13 Last updated: 2009-02-16
Glendor, U. (2008). Epidemiology of traumatic dental injuries--a 12 year review of the literature. Dental traumatology, 24(6), 603-611
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epidemiology of traumatic dental injuries--a 12 year review of the literature
2008 (English)In: Dental traumatology, ISSN 1600-4469, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 603-611Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several reports have been published during the past decades showing a lack of care of traumatic dental injuries (TDIs) as well as dentists and lay people having insufficient knowledge on how to manage TDIs. This situation could seriously affect the outcome of TDIs, especially a complicated TDI. The overall aim of this study was to present a review of dental trauma care with focus on treatment and dentists and lay persons lack of knowledge on how to manage a TDI. A further aim is to introduce the actors involved and the outcome of their education.

The databases Medline, Cochrane, SSCI, SCI and CINAHL from the year 1995 to the present were used. Focus was on treatment need, inadequate care, lack of knowledge and poor organization of emergency care.

Studies from different countries demonstrated that treatment needs were not properly met despite the fact that not all untreated teeth needed treatment. Treatment in emergency dental care was often inadequate or inappropriate. With the exception of lay people, teachers, medical personnel and even dentists performed inadequate care. Furthermore, information to the public was insufficient. Despite a low level of knowledge, lay people expressed a strong interest in helping someone with a TDI.

The conclusion from this review is that consideration must be given the problematic results from different studies on education or information about dental trauma care. Despite that the studies reviewed were from different countries and groups of people, the results seem to be consistent, i.e. that a large part of the educational process of professional caregivers and lay people has failed. Too much hope seems to be put on lay people to handle difficult cases such as tooth avulsion. Education of caregivers and lay people is a field where much remains to be explored.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-57563 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-9657.2008.00696.x (DOI)19021651 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2009-02-14 Created: 2009-02-13 Last updated: 2012-04-12
Glendor, U., Jonsson, D., Halling, A. & Lindqvist, K. (2001). Direct and indirect costs of dental trauma in Sweden: a 2-year prospective study of children and adolescents. Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, 29(2), 150-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct and indirect costs of dental trauma in Sweden: a 2-year prospective study of children and adolescents
2001 (English)In: Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology, ISSN 0301-5661, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 150-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To study total costs, including direct costs (health care service, loss of personal property, medicine and transport) and indirect costs (loss of production or leisure) of dental trauma to children and adolescents with special reference to predictors.

METHODS: The study was based on a random sample of 192 children and adolescents with a dental trauma reported to an insurance company and prospectively followed up by telephone interviews over a period of 2 years.

RESULTS: On average, health care service costs represented 2,955 SEK (SD=3,818) and total costs 4,569 SEK (SD=3,053) for dental trauma to permanent teeth, and 837 SEK (SD=898) and 1,746 SEK (SD=1,183) for trauma to primary teeth. The most extensive type of indirect cost was loss of production or leisure, which averaged 1,286 SEK (SD=1,830) for injuries to permanent teeth and 699 SEK (SD=1,239) for injuries to primary teeth. Multiple regression analysis of demographic and dental injury variables showed that complicated trauma was of special importance to costs for permanent and primary teeth injuries. The average relative increase in total costs to patients and companions for complicated injury to permanent teeth was 140% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66-248%) for patients and 132% (95% CI, 54-249%) for companions. Lack of access to a dental clinic near the place of residence could increase the average total costs of injuries to permanent teeth by 91% for companions (95% CI, 20-204%) and for primary teeth by 134% (95% CI, 38-296%).

CONCLUSIONS: Dental traumas result in both direct and indirect costs, with a predominance of direct costs. The direct costs primarily depend on degree of severity, while indirect costs are mostly due to compromised access to health care service. Traumas to permanent teeth are especially costly and, due to additional maintenance, the care may continue for several years. This study has drawn attention to the significant implications of dental trauma to patient and companion, a new area where further studies are warranted.

Keywords
adolescence, child, tooth injuries, costs, permanent dentition, primary dentition, regression analysis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13547 (URN)10.1111/j.1600-0528.2001.290210.x (DOI)
Available from: 1999-02-27 Created: 1999-02-27 Last updated: 2009-05-15
Glendor, U., Halling, A., Bodin, L., Andersson, L., Nygren, Å., Karlsson, G. & Koucheki, B. (2000). Direct and indirect time spent on care of dental trauma: a 2-year prospective study of children and adolescents. Endodontics and dental traumatology, 16(1), 16-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct and indirect time spent on care of dental trauma: a 2-year prospective study of children and adolescents
Show others...
2000 (English)In: Endodontics and dental traumatology, ISSN 0109-2502, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 16-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim was to account for the total time spent by professional care-givers (direct time) and by patients and companions engaged as support and help (indirect time) to treat and otherwise attend to children and adolescents with dental trauma to primary and permanent teeth. The study was based on a random sample of 192 children and adolescents with dental traumas reported to an insurance company and prospectively followed up by telephone interviews over a period of 2 years after the trauma episode. On average, direct time represented 16% of total time for all visits for dental trauma to permanent teeth and 11% for trauma to primary teeth. The most extensive type of indirect time was transport time, which took up 30% of the total time spent on injuries to permanent teeth and 36% for injuries to primary teeth. Multiple regression analysis of the impact of dental and demographic injury variables on the time variables showed that complicated trauma was associated with extended time, direct as well as indirect, for permanent and primary teeth injuries. Our estimate of the average relative increase in total time spent by patients and companions in cases of complicated injury to permanent teeth was 117% (95% confidence interval [CI], 52-211) for patients and 112% (95% CI, 42-217) for companions. For transport time a strong predictor was access to a dental clinic near the place of residence. Lack of access could extend the average transport time by 180% (95% CI, 80-335) for patients and 163% (95% CI, 67-317) for their companions in cases of injuries to primary teeth.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13546 (URN)
Available from: 1999-02-27 Created: 1999-02-27 Last updated: 2009-02-12
Glendor, U. (2000). On Dental Trauma in Children and Adolescents: Incidence, Risk, Treatment, Time and Costs. (Doctoral dissertation). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On Dental Trauma in Children and Adolescents: Incidence, Risk, Treatment, Time and Costs
2000 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Dental trauma occur in childhood and adolescence with consequences in time and costs for both patient and family. The scientific knowledge of these matters is scarce. For some individuals, dental trauma will result in long, time-consuming and costly treatments in childhood which will continue into adulthood.

Aim: The thesis aimed to increase the knowledge of incidence, risk, treatment, time and costs spent on dental traumas to primary and permanent teeth in children and adolescents.

Material and method: The material for the studies emanated from the county of Västmanland, Sweden, and the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark, and from a Swedish nation-wide material (Folksam). The material was collected from accident reports, dental files, dental trauma forms, questionnaires and telephone interviews. Descriptive, prospective and analytical methods were used. A classification of uncomplicated and complicated dental traumas was presented.

Results: The incidence of dental trauma to boys was higher, compared to girls, in the county of Västmanland in almost all age groups. For both sexes, the first years in life and the first years in school were the most accident prone periods with incidence twice as high as the average incidence for all children and adolescents in the county. Every third trauma was complicated with injuries to the pulp or periodontal ligaments. Every second patient with a dental trauma to permanent teeth suffered from multiple dental trauma episodes (MDTE) during a period of 12 years. In almost every second patient with MDTE, at least one of the affected teeth had sustained repeated trauma episodes. The risk of sustaining MDTE increased when the first trauma episode occurred in the age interval of 6-10, compared to 11-18 year olds. During a 12-year period, treatment times for complicated traumas were 2.0 and 2.7 times higher for primary and permanent teeth, respectively, compared to corresponding values for uncomplicated traumas. On average, direct time (treatment time) represented 11% and 16% of the total time, while the direct costs (health are service, transport, loss of personal property and medicine) represented 60% and 72% of the total costs of traumas to primary and permanent teeth, respectively, during a 2-year period for cases of a nation-wide material.

Conclusion: Dental traumas are frequent and some individuals are injured several times. Besides treatment time, efforts from the family are substantial in time and costs. Parameters such as degree of severity, access to treatment and place of injury are of major importance to both patient and family and should be considered when calculating time and costs of dental trauma in children and adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2000. p. 52
Series
Linköping University Medical Dissertations, ISSN 0345-0082 ; 624
Keywords
adolescence, child, time, incidence, costs, permanent dentition, primary dentition, risk, tooth injuries
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-5016 (URN)91-7219-581-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2000-04-28, Berzeliussalen, Campus US, Linköpings universitet, Linköping, 13:00 (English)
Supervisors
Available from: 1999-02-27 Created: 1999-02-27 Last updated: 2012-01-24Bibliographically approved
Glendor, U., Koucheki, B. & Halling, A. (2000). Risk evaluation and type of treatment of multiple dental trauma episodes to permanent teeth. Endodontics & dental traumatology., 16(5), 205-210
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risk evaluation and type of treatment of multiple dental trauma episodes to permanent teeth
2000 (English)In: Endodontics & dental traumatology., ISSN 0109-2502, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 205-210Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies have shown that some children and adolescents are effected only once with a dental trauma, while others seem to be accident-prone and suffer from multiple dental trauma episodes (MDTE). Studies have also shown that dental traumas mostly affect upper permanent and medial incisors. Less is known about treatment consequences related to teeth with repeated dental trauma episodes. The aim was therefore to evaluate the risk of MDTE to permanent teeth among children and adolescents by age and gender and to compare types of dental treatment modalities used for patients with one episode and those with MDTE and with single and repeated traumatized teeth. The study was based on a random sample of 83 Danish 6-18-year-old children and adolescents born in 1970 who suffered from dental trauma episodes. All patients were followed during a 12-year period (1976-1988). Forty-one of the patients were registered with MDTE with a range of 2-7 episodes and a mean of 2.9 episodes/patient (SD = 1.1). The mean age at single and MDTE was 11.4 years (SD = 3.6) and 8.6 years (SD = 2.1), respectively. No significant differences were found between age at first episode and the number of MDTE per patient. The number of patients with MDTE was significantly higher among those who suffered their first trauma episode in the age interval 6-10 years than in the age interval 11-18 years (P < 0.001). A survival analysis showed that the risk of sustaining another trauma episode increased by 14.9-30.3% when the first trauma occurred before the age of 11, compared to 0-7.4% after the age of 10. The risk of sustaining multiple injuries was 8.4 times higher when the first trauma episode occurred at 9 years of age, compared with those occurring at age 12. The survival analysis also showed that for every new trauma episode, the interval between them became closer. Forty-five per cent of the MDTE affected teeth had already sustained an injury. With an increased number of trauma episodes per patient followed an increase in the number of follow-ups, filling therapy, information and prosthetics, whereas the rates of endodontics, surgery, and consultations were unchanged or even decreased.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-13544 (URN)
Available from: 1999-02-27 Created: 1999-02-27
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