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Broman, David
Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Vasilevskaya, M., Broman, D. & Sandahl, K. (2015). Assessing Large Project Courses: Model, Activities, and Lessons Learned. ACM Transactions on Computing Education, 15(4), 20:1-20:30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing Large Project Courses: Model, Activities, and Lessons Learned
2015 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Computing Education, ISSN 1946-6226, E-ISSN 1946-6226, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 20:1-20:30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In a modern computing curriculum, large project courses are essential to give students hands-on experience of working in a realistic software engineering project. Assessing such projects is, however, extremely challenging. There are various aspects and tradeoffs of assessments that can affect the course quality. Individual assessments can give fair grading of individuals, but may loose focus of the project as a group activity. Extensive teacher involvement is necessary for objective assessment, but may affect the way students are working. Continuous feedback to students can enhance learning, but may be hard to combine with fair assessment. Most previous work is focusing on some specific assessment aspect, whereas we in this paper present an assessment model that consists of a collection of assessment activities, each covering different aspects. We have applied, developed, and improved these activities during a seven-year period. To evaluate the usefulness of the model, we perform questionnaire-based surveys over a two-years period. Furthermore, we design and execute an experiment that studies to what extent students can perform fair peer assessment and to what degree the assessments of students and teachers agree. We analyze the results, discuss findings, and summarize lessons learned.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACM Special Interest Group on Computer Science Education, 2015
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123544 (URN)10.1145/2732156 (DOI)000367991400005 ()
Available from: 2015-12-21 Created: 2015-12-21 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Vasilevskaya, M., Broman, D. & Sandahl, K. (2014). An Assessment Model for Large Project Courses. In: Proceedings of the 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE): . Paper presented at 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE 2014), Atlanta, GA, USA, March 5-8, 2014. Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Assessment Model for Large Project Courses
2014 (English)In: Proceedings of the 45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE), Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Larger project courses, such as capstone projects, are essential in a modern computing curriculum. Assessing such projects is, how- ever, extremely challenging. There are various aspects and trade-offs of assessments that can affect the quality of a project course. Individual assessments can give fair grading of individuals, but may loose focus of the project as a group activity. Extensive teacher involvement is necessary for objective assessment, but may affect the way students are working. Continuous feedback to students can enhance learning, but may be hard to combine with fair assessment. Most previous work is focusing on some specific assessment aspect, whereas we in this paper present an assessment model that consists of a collection of assessment activities, each covering different aspects. We have applied, developed, and improved these activities during a six-year period and evaluated their usefulness by performing a questionnaire-based survey.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2014
Keywords
Project Courses; Assessment; Software Engineering
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103001 (URN)10.1145/2538862.2538947 (DOI)2-s2.0-84899725619 (Scopus ID)978-1-4503-2605-6 (ISBN)
Conference
45th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (SIGCSE 2014), Atlanta, GA, USA, March 5-8, 2014
Available from: 2014-02-22 Created: 2014-01-09 Last updated: 2015-04-02Bibliographically approved
Broman, D., Derler, P. & Eidson, J. C. (2013). Temporal Issues in Cyber-Physical Systems. JOURNAL OF THE INDIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, 93(3), 389-402
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Temporal Issues in Cyber-Physical Systems
2013 (English)In: JOURNAL OF THE INDIAN INSTITUTE OF SCIENCE, ISSN 0970-4140, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 389-402Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper reviews the use of time, clocks, and clock synchronization protocols in cyber-physical systems (CPS). Recent advances in the area of timing suggest avenues of research and potential new application areas. We discuss how introducing timestamps and clocks can help overcome issues such as latency, jitter, and determining correct execution order. Furthermore, we show how system complexity can be reduced and distribution as well as parallelism can be done deterministically. We also point to recent work in raising time to first class citizen status in modeling and implementation. In particular, we describe design and execution environments of CPS and specialized hardware such as predictable timing architectures where time plays a key role.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INDIAN INST SCIENCE, INDIAN INST SCIENCE, BANGALORE 560012, INDIA, 2013
Keywords
Timestamps, Clocks, Synchronization, Ordering, Simultaneity, Discrete event systems, Distributed control, Real-time systems, PTIDES
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-102792 (URN)000327113600003 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|iCyPhy Research Center (Industrial Cyber-Physical Systems)||IBM||United Technologies||Center for Hybrid and Embedded Software Systems (CHESS) at UC Berkeley||National Science Foundation, NSF|07208820931843|Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)|N0013-12-1-G015|Bosch||National Instruments||Toyota||Swedish Research Council|623-2011-955|

Available from: 2014-01-07 Created: 2013-12-26 Last updated: 2014-01-07
Broman, D., Fritzson, P., Hedin, G. & Åkesson, J. (2012). A comparison of two metacompilation approaches to implementing a complex domain-specific language. In: Proceedings of the 27th Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing: . Paper presented at 27th Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing (SAC 2012), 26-30 March 2012, Riva del Garda (Trento), Italy (pp. 1919-1921). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of two metacompilation approaches to implementing a complex domain-specific language
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the 27th Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012, p. 1919-1921Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Operational semantics and attribute grammars are examples of formalisms that can be used for generating compilers. We are interested in finding similarities and differences in how these approaches are applied to complex languages, and for generating compilers of such maturity that they have users in industry.

As a specific case, we present a comparative analysis of two compilers for Modelica, a language for physical modeling, and which contains numerous compilation challenges. The two compilers are OpenModelica, which is based on big-step operational semantics, and JModelica.org, which is based on reference attribute grammars.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2012
Keywords
metacompilation, operational semantics, attribute grammars
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93299 (URN)10.1145/2245276.2232092 (DOI)978-1-4503-0857-1 (ISBN)
Conference
27th Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing (SAC 2012), 26-30 March 2012, Riva del Garda (Trento), Italy
Available from: 2013-05-30 Created: 2013-05-30 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Isaac, L., Reineke, J., Broman, D., Zimmer, M. & Lee, E. (2012). A PRET microarchitecture implementation with repeatable timing and competitive performance. In: Computer Design (ICCD), 2012: . Paper presented at IEEE 30th International Conference on Computer Design(ICCD 2012), 30 september - 3 October 2012, Montreal, QC, Canada (pp. 87-93). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A PRET microarchitecture implementation with repeatable timing and competitive performance
Show others...
2012 (English)In: Computer Design (ICCD), 2012, IEEE , 2012, p. 87-93Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We contend that repeatability of execution times is crucial to the validity of testing of real-time systems. However, computer architecture designs fail to deliver repeatable timing, a consequence of aggressive techniques that improve average-case performance. This paper introduces the Precision-Timed ARM (PTARM), a precision-timed (PRET) microarchitecture implementation that exhibits repeatable execution times without sacrificing performance. The PTARM employs a repeatable thread-interleaved pipeline with an exposed memory hierarchy, including a repeatable DRAM controller. Our benchmarks show an improved throughput compared to a single-threaded in-order five-stage pipeline, given sufficient parallelism in the software.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2012
Series
IEEE International Conference on Computer Design, ISSN 1063-6404
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93303 (URN)10.1109/ICCD.2012.6378622 (DOI)978-1-4673-3051-0 (ISBN)
Conference
IEEE 30th International Conference on Computer Design(ICCD 2012), 30 september - 3 October 2012, Montreal, QC, Canada
Available from: 2013-05-30 Created: 2013-05-30 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
Broman, D. & Nilsson, H. (2012). Node-Based Connection Semanticsfor Equation-Based Object-Oriented Modeling Languages. In: Proceedings of Fourteenth International Symposium on Practical Aspects of Declarative Languages (PADL 2012): . Paper presented at International Symposium on Practical Aspects of Declarative Languages (PADL 2012) (pp. 258-272). Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Node-Based Connection Semanticsfor Equation-Based Object-Oriented Modeling Languages
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of Fourteenth International Symposium on Practical Aspects of Declarative Languages (PADL 2012), Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer , 2012, p. 258-272Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Berlin/Heidelberg: Springer, 2012
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349 ; 7149
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93300 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-27694-1_19 (DOI)
Conference
International Symposium on Practical Aspects of Declarative Languages (PADL 2012)
Available from: 2013-05-30 Created: 2013-05-30 Last updated: 2018-01-31
Broman, D., Sandahl, K. & Abu Baker, M. (2012). The Company Approach to Software Engineering Project Courses. IEEE Transactions on Education, 55(4), 445-452
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Company Approach to Software Engineering Project Courses
2012 (English)In: IEEE Transactions on Education, ISSN 0018-9359, E-ISSN 1557-9638, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 445-452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Teaching larger software engineering project courses at the end of a computing curriculum is a way for students to learn some aspects of real-world jobs in industry. Such courses, often referred to as capstone courses, are effective for learning how to apply the skills they have acquired in, for example, design, test, and configuration management. However, these courses are typically performed in small teams, giving only a limited realistic perspective of problems faced when working in real companies. This paper describes an alternative approach to classic capstone projects, with the aim of being more realistic from an organizational, process, and communication perspective. This methodology, called the company approach, is described by intended learning outcomes, teaching/learning activities, and assessment tasks. The approach is implemented and evaluated in a larger Masters student course.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2012
Keywords
Capstone projects, company approach, constructive alignment, software engineering (SE)
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69483 (URN)10.1109/TE.2012.2187208 (DOI)000314465800001 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Department of Computer and Information Science, Linkoping University, Sweden||

Available from: 2011-06-28 Created: 2011-06-28 Last updated: 2017-12-11
Jonsson, L., Broman, D., Sandahl, K. & Eldh, S. (2012). Towards Automated Anomaly Report Assignment in Large Complex Systems using Stacked Generalization. In: Software Testing, Verification and Validation (ICST), 2012: . Paper presented at Fifth IEEE International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation (ICST 2012), 17-21 April 2012, Montreal, QC, Canada (pp. 437-446). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Automated Anomaly Report Assignment in Large Complex Systems using Stacked Generalization
2012 (English)In: Software Testing, Verification and Validation (ICST), 2012, IEEE , 2012, p. 437-446Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Maintenance costs can be substantial for organizations with very large and complex software systems. This paper describes research for reducing anomaly report turnaround time which, if successful, would contribute to reducing maintenance costs and at the same time maintaining a good customer perception. Specifically, we are addressing the problem of the manual, laborious, and inaccurate process of assigning anomaly reports to the correct design teams. In large organizations with complex systems this is particularly problematic because the receiver of the anomaly report from customer may not have detailed knowledge of the whole system. As a consequence, anomaly reports may be wrongly routed around in the organization causing delays and unnecessary work. We have developed and validated machine learning approach, based on stacked generalization, to automatically route anomaly reports to the correct design teams in the organization. A research prototype has been implemented and evaluated on roughly one year of real anomaly reports on a large and complex system at Ericsson AB. The prediction accuracy of the automation is approaching that of humans, indicating that the anomaly report handling time could be significantly reduced by using our approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2012
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93231 (URN)10.1109/ICST.2012.124 (DOI)978-1-4577-1906-6 (ISBN)
Conference
Fifth IEEE International Conference on Software Testing, Verification and Validation (ICST 2012), 17-21 April 2012, Montreal, QC, Canada
Note

Finansierat av Ericsson AB

Available from: 2013-05-27 Created: 2013-05-27 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Fritzson, P., Lee, E., Cellier, F. & Broman, D. (2011). Equation-Based Object-Oriented Modeling Languages and Tools: Report on the Workshop EOOLT 2010 at MODELS 2010 Oslo, Norway, October 3, 2010. In: MODELS 2010 Workshops: (pp. 140-144). Springer Berlin/Heidelberg
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Equation-Based Object-Oriented Modeling Languages and Tools: Report on the Workshop EOOLT 2010 at MODELS 2010 Oslo, Norway, October 3, 2010
2011 (English)In: MODELS 2010 Workshops, Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, , p. 5p. 140-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

EOOLT 2010 was the third edition of the EOOLT workshop series. The workshop is intended to bring together researchers and practitioners fromdifferent equation-based object-oriented (EOO) modeling language communities. This year’s workshop also expands the scope to include the whole design space of languages for cyber-physical systems, where physical dynamics are mixed with networks and software. The workshop gathered 31 participants to present and discuss thirteen different papers grouped into the four areas of real-time oriented modeling languages and tools, modeling language design, simulation and model compilation, and modeling and simulation tools.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011. p. 5
Series
Lecture Notes in Computer Science, ISSN 0302-9743, E-ISSN 1611-3349 ; 6627
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93310 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-21210-9_13 (DOI)9783642212093 (ISBN)9783642212109 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-05-30 Created: 2013-05-30 Last updated: 2018-01-31Bibliographically approved
Broman, D. & Sandahl, K. (2011). How can we make software engineering text books well-founded, up-to-date, and accessible to students?. In: Software Engineering Education and Training (CSEE&T), 2011: . Paper presented at 24th IEEE-CS Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training (CSEE&T 2011), 22-24 May 2011, Honolulu, HI, USA (pp. 386-390). IEEE
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How can we make software engineering text books well-founded, up-to-date, and accessible to students?
2011 (English)In: Software Engineering Education and Training (CSEE&T), 2011, IEEE , 2011, p. 386-390Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When teaching software engineering courses it is highly important to have good text books that are well-founded, up-to-date, and easily accessible to students. However, currently available text books on the market are either very broad or highly specialized, making it hard to select appropriate books for specific software engineering courses. Moreover, due to the rapidly changing subject of software engineering, books tend to become obsolete, which make students hesitate to buy books even if they are part of the listed course literature. In this paper, we briefly explain and discuss an approach of using a web-based system for creating collaborative and peer-reviewed text books that can be customized individually for specific courses. We describe and discuss the proposed system from a use case perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE, 2011
Series
Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training. Proceedings, ISSN 1093-0175
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-93229 (URN)10.1109/CSEET.2011.5876110 (DOI)978-1-4577-0349-2 (ISBN)e-978-1-4577-0347-8 (ISBN)
Conference
24th IEEE-CS Conference on Software Engineering Education and Training (CSEE&T 2011), 22-24 May 2011, Honolulu, HI, USA
Available from: 2013-05-27 Created: 2013-05-27 Last updated: 2018-01-11Bibliographically approved
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