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Dekker, Sidney
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Dekker, S. (2008). Understanding situated performance in human error investigations (2ed.). In: John A Wise, Daniel J Garland, V David Hopkin (Ed.), Handbook of forensic human factors: . London: Taylor & Francis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding situated performance in human error investigations
2008 (English)In: Handbook of forensic human factors / [ed] John A Wise, Daniel J Garland, V David Hopkin, London: Taylor & Francis , 2008, 2, p. -704Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A complete examination of issues and concepts relating to human factors in simulation, this book covers theory and application in space, ships, submarines, naval aviation, and commercial aviation. The authors examine issues of simulation and their effect on the validity and functionality of simulators as a training device. The chapters contain in depth discussions of these particular characteristics and issues. They also incorporate theories pertaining to the motivational aspects of training, simulation of social events, and PC based simulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Taylor & Francis, 2008 Edition: 2
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24181 (URN)3771 (Local ID)978-0-8058-5906-5 (ISBN)99-2302421-0 (ISBN)3771 (Archive number)3771 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2013-10-22Bibliographically approved
Goteman, O., Smith, K. & Dekker, S. (2007). HUD with a velocity (flight-path) vector reduces lateral error during landing in restricted visibility. The International journal of aviation psychology, 17(1), 91-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HUD with a velocity (flight-path) vector reduces lateral error during landing in restricted visibility
2007 (English)In: The International journal of aviation psychology, ISSN 1050-8414, E-ISSN 1532-7108, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 91-108Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The operational community has assumed that using a head-up display (HUD) instead of conventional head-down displays will increase accuracy and safety during approach and landing. The putative mechanism for this increase in safety is that previously demonstrated improvements in lateral and vertical control of the aircraft in flight should carry over to the landing situation. Alternatively, it is possible that, during approach and landing, the HUD might affect the pilot's ability to assimilate outside cues at the decision height, thereby reducing the success ratio for landings using an HUD. This article reports a pair of experiments that test these competing hypotheses. Taking advantage of the opportunity when an air transport operator introduced HUD in an existing aircraft fleet, we were able to use a Boeing 737-700 full-motion simulator flown by commercial airline pilots. We explored the effects of (a) HUD use, (b) ambient visibility, and (c) length of approach lighting on the size and location of the touchdown footprint. We also explored the effects of HUD use on approach success ratio. HUD use reduced the width of the touchdown footprint in all tested visibility and lighting conditions, including visibility below the minimum allowed. HUD use had no effect on the length of the touchdown footprint. We could not detect any decrease in approach success rate for HUD approaches. Based on these empirical data, the minimum visibility for approaches using HUDs could be set lower than for approaches without an HUD. Copyright © 2007, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.

National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-49721 (URN)10.1207/s15327108ijap1701_6 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-12
Caldenfors, D., Dekker, S. & Smith, C. S. (2006). An Initial Model of Driver-Vehicle Performance in Recovery from Skids on Icy Roads. In: 50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factor and Ergonomics Society,2006. San Fransisco: Human Factors and Ergonomic Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Initial Model of Driver-Vehicle Performance in Recovery from Skids on Icy Roads
2006 (English)In: 50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factor and Ergonomics Society,2006, San Fransisco: Human Factors and Ergonomic Society , 2006Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

 Closed-loop instability caused by excess phase lag has been studied widely in aviation. Here we develop and test a model of its counterpart in vehicle-driver-coupling, where participants were asked to recover from a skid on a slippery road. We model the damping effect of sucessful recovery as viscoelastic behavior. Oscillation number is the predictor variable; steering wheel angle is the response variable. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Fransisco: Human Factors and Ergonomic Society, 2006
Keywords
driver-vehicle performance
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-36684 (URN)32136 (Local ID)32136 (Archive number)32136 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-10 Created: 2009-10-10
Björklund, C. M., Alfredson, J. & Dekker, S. (2006). Mode monitoring and call-outs: An eye-tracking study of 2-crew automated flight deck operations. The International journal of aviation psychology, 16(3), 263-275
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mode monitoring and call-outs: An eye-tracking study of 2-crew automated flight deck operations
2006 (English)In: The International journal of aviation psychology, ISSN 1050-8414, E-ISSN 1532-7108, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 263-275 Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mode awareness has been suggested as a critical factor in safe operations of automated aircraft. This study investigated mode awareness by measuring eye point of gaze of both pilots during simulated commercial flights, while recording call-outs and tracking aircraft performance. The results of this study show that the compliance to manufacturer or air carrier procedures regarding mode monitoring and call-outs was very low. However, this did not seem to have a negative effect on the flight path or safety during our observations. Crews exhibited a proliferation of strategies to keep track of status and behavior of the automation, often with little reliance on the flight mode annunciations of the primary flight display. The data confirm the limitations of current flight mode annunciator designs, and suggest that mode awareness is a more complex phenomenon than what can be captured by measuring eye point of gaze and communication alone.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2006
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-12753 (URN)10.1207/s15327108ijap1603_2 (DOI)
Available from: 2007-11-09 Created: 2007-11-09 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Dekker, S. (2004). Accidents in transportation (1ed.). In: Charles Spielberger (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology: . San Diego, CA: Academic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accidents in transportation
2004 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology / [ed] Charles Spielberger, San Diego, CA: Academic Press , 2004, 1, p. -2688Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Encyclopedia of Applied Psychology encompasses applications of psychological knowledge and procedures in all areas of psychology. This compendium is a major source of information for professional practitioners, researchers in psychology, and for anyone interested in applied psychology. The topics included are, but are not limited to, aging (geropsychology), assessment, clinical, cognitive, community, counseling, educational, environmental, family, industrial/organizational, health, school, sports, and transportation psychology. The entries drawn from the above-referenced areas provide a clear definition of topic, a brief review of theoretical basis relevant to the topic, and emphasize major areas of application.Also available online via ScienceDirect - featuring extensive browsing, searching, and internal cross-referencing between articles in the work, plus dynamic linking to journal articles and abstract databases, making navigation flexible and easy. For more information, pricing options and availability visit www.info.sciencedirect.com.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
San Diego, CA: Academic Press, 2004 Edition: 1
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24183 (URN)3773 (Local ID)0-12-657410-3 (ISBN)978-0-1265-7410-4 (ISBN)3773 (Archive number)3773 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2013-10-21Bibliographically approved
Steele, K. & Dekker, S. (2004). Aviation incident reporting in Sweden. Human factors in design, safety, and management. In: The 2004 annual meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe,2004.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aviation incident reporting in Sweden. Human factors in design, safety, and management
2004 (English)In: The 2004 annual meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe,2004, 2004Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24185 (URN)3775 (Local ID)3775 (Archive number)3775 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07
Dekker, S. & Nyce, J. (2004). How can ergonomics influence design? Moving from research findings to future systems. Ergonomics, 47(15), 1624-1639
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How can ergonomics influence design? Moving from research findings to future systems
2004 (English)In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 47, no 15, p. 1624-1639Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ergonomics design is about the creation of future work. So how can ergonomics research support and inform design if its findings are cast in a language oriented towards current work derived from field observations or laboratory settings? In this paper we assess instances of three different strands (experimental, ethnomethodological, and surveys) of ergonomics research on paper flight strips in air traffic control, for how they analytically confront future work and how they make the findings relevant or credible with respect to future work. How these justifications come about, or how valid (or well argued for) they are, is rarely considered in the ergonomics literature. All three strands appear to rely on rhetoric and argument as well as method and analysis, to justify findings in terms of their future applicability. Closing the gap between research results and future work is an important aim of the ergonomic enterprise. Better understanding of the processes necessary to bridge this gap may be critical for progress in ergonomics research and for the use of its findings in actual design processes. © 2004 Taylor & Francis Ltd.

Keywords
Design, Epistemology, Ergonomics research, Ethnography, Technology transfer
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-45557 (URN)10.1080/00140130412331290853 (DOI)
Available from: 2009-10-11 Created: 2009-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-13
Smith, C. S., Dekker, S. & Goteman, Ö. (2004). HUD (Head-Up Display) use Improves Landing Performance in a Full-Motion Simulator. In: The 48th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society,2004.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>HUD (Head-Up Display) use Improves Landing Performance in a Full-Motion Simulator
2004 (English)In: The 48th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society,2004, 2004Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24116 (URN)3692 (Local ID)3692 (Archive number)3692 (OAI)
Note
CR-1009Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07
Dekker, S. & Hollnagel, E. (2004). Human factors and folk models. Cognition, Technology & Work, 6, 79-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Human factors and folk models
2004 (English)In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 6, p. 79-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Computer Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-23560 (URN)3039 (Local ID)3039 (Archive number)3039 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2018-01-13
Dekker, S. (2004). On the other side of promise. What should we automate today? (2ed.). In: John A. Wise, V. David Hopkin, Daniel J. Garland (Ed.), Human factors in the design of civil aircraft: . Aldershot, UK: Ahsgate
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the other side of promise. What should we automate today?
2004 (English)In: Human factors in the design of civil aircraft / [ed] John A. Wise, V. David Hopkin, Daniel J. Garland, Aldershot, UK: Ahsgate , 2004, 2, p. -704Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A complete examination of issues and concepts relating to human factors in simulation, this book covers theory and application in space, ships, submarines, naval aviation, and commercial aviation. The authors examine issues of simulation and their effect on the validity and functionality of simulators as a training device. The chapters contain in depth discussions of these particular characteristics and issues. They also incorporate theories pertaining to the motivational aspects of training, simulation of social events, and PC based simulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Aldershot, UK: Ahsgate, 2004 Edition: 2
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-24184 (URN)3774 (Local ID)978-1-4200-6357-8 (ISBN)0-805-8-5906-3 (ISBN)3774 (Archive number)3774 (OAI)
Available from: 2009-10-07 Created: 2009-10-07 Last updated: 2013-10-21Bibliographically approved
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