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Danielsson, Henrik, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0446-0827
Publications (10 of 86) Show all publications
Marsja, E., Holmer, E. & Danielsson, H. (2024). Interplay between working memory and speech recognition declines over time. In: : . Paper presented at Speech in Noise Workshop.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interplay between working memory and speech recognition declines over time
2024 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Age-related changes in auditory and cognitive functions are well-documented, with increased hearing thresholds (e.g., Wiley et al., 2008) and reduced working memory capacity (WMC; e.g., Wingfield et al., 1988) among older adults. Moreover, aging has been linked to poorer speech recognition in noise (e.g., Marsja et al., 2022), highlighting the multifaceted impact of age on auditory and cognitive domains. Our study examined the dynamic relationship between auditory and cognitive changes over time to shed light on the direction of influence between the two. To this aim, we employed change score modeling.

Methods: We analyzed data from 111 normally hearing individuals from the n200 study (https://2024.speech-in-noise.eu/proxy.php?id=81). At Time 1 (T1), their mean age was 61.2 years (SD = 8.00), and at Time 2 (T2), their mean age was 67.0 years (SD = 8.06). We used Latent Change Score modeling to explore the changes in WMC and speech recognition in noise. To measure speech recognition in noise, we used signal-to-noise ratios from the Hearing in Noise Test during speech-shaped noise. The reading span test was used as a measure for WMC.

Results and Conclusion: Preliminary results showed a decline in WMC, signified by the negative relationship between Reading Span at T1 and changes in Reading Span at T2. This negative relationship indicates that individuals with higher initial WMC experienced subsequent declines in their cognitive abilities. Furthermore, our analysis revealed a negative relationship between changes in speech recognition in noise at T2 and Reading Span at T1. This relationship suggests that individuals with higher initial WMC experienced less decline in their speech recognition in noise over time. Further research with additional time points may be needed to fully elucidate the complex relationship between cognitive and auditory changes over time.

National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-200191 (URN)10.5281/zenodo.10497754 (DOI)
Conference
Speech in Noise Workshop
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2007-08654Swedish Research Council, 2017-06092_VRForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, FORTE 2012-01693_Forte
Available from: 2024-01-15 Created: 2024-01-15 Last updated: 2024-01-15
Hoogeveen, S., Sarafoglou, A., Aczel, B., Dahlström, Ö., Danielsson, H. & Homman, L. (2023). A many-analysts approach to the relation between religiosity and well-being. Religion, Brain & Behavior, 13(3), 237-283
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A many-analysts approach to the relation between religiosity and well-being
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2023 (English)In: Religion, Brain & Behavior, ISSN 2153-599X, E-ISSN 2153-5981, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 237-283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relation between religiosity and well-being is one of the most researched topics in the psychology of religion, yet the directionality and robustness of the effect remains debated. Here, we adopted a many-analysts approach to assess the robustness of this relation based on a new cross-cultural dataset (N = 10, 535 participants from 24 countries). We recruited 120 analysis teams to investigate (1) whether religious people self-report higher well-being, and (2) whether the relation between religiosity and self-reported well-being depends on perceived cultural norms of religion (i.e., whether it is considered normal and desirable to be religious in a given country). In a two-stage procedure, the teams first created an analysis plan and then executed their planned analysis on the data. For the first research question, all but 3 teams reported positive effect sizes with credible/confidence intervals excluding zero (median reported beta = 0.120). For the second research question, this was the case for 65% of the teams (median reported beta = 0.039). While most teams applied (multilevel) linear regression models, there was considerable variability in the choice of items used to construct the independent variables, the dependent variable, and the included covariates.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge; Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
Health, many analysts, open science, religion
National Category
Religious Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-187635 (URN)10.1080/2153599X.2022.2070255 (DOI)000821405300001 ()
Note

Funding: Australian Research Council [DP180102384]; Cogito Foundation [R10917]; French Agence Nationale de la Recherche [17-EURE-0017, 10-IDEX-0001-02]; National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship [GR100544, DGE-2139841]; Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research [406-17-568, 016.Vici.170.083, 016.Vidi.188.001]; John Templeton Foundation [60663]; Templeton Religion Trust [TRT 0154]; German Research Foundation [GRK 2277]

Available from: 2022-08-17 Created: 2022-08-17 Last updated: 2024-01-10
Homman, L., Danielsson, H. & Rönnberg, J. (2023). A structural equation mediation model captures the predictions amongst the parameters of the ease of language understanding model. Frontiers in Psychology, 14, Article ID 1015227.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A structural equation mediation model captures the predictions amongst the parameters of the ease of language understanding model
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1015227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the present study was to assess the validity of the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model through a statistical assessment of the relationships among its main parameters: processing speed, phonology, working memory (WM), and dB Speech Noise Ratio (SNR) for a given Speech Recognition Threshold (SRT) in a sample of hearing aid users from the n200 database.

Methods: Hearing aid users were assessed on several hearing and cognitive tests. Latent Structural Equation Models (SEMs) were applied to investigate the relationship between the main parameters of the ELU model while controlling for age and PTA. Several competing models were assessed.

Results: Analyses indicated that a mediating SEM was the best fit for the data. The results showed that (i) phonology independently predicted speech recognition threshold in both easy and adverse listening conditions and (ii) WM was not predictive of dB SNR for a given SRT in the easier listening conditions (iii) processing speed was predictive of dB SNR for a given SRT mediated via WM in the more adverse conditions.

Conclusion: The results were in line with the predictions of the ELU model: (i) phonology contributed to dB SNR for a given SRT in all listening conditions, (ii) WM is only invoked when listening conditions are adverse, (iii) better WM capacity aids the understanding of what has been said in adverse listening conditions, and finally (iv) the results highlight the importance and optimization of processing speed in conditions when listening conditions are adverse and WM is activated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
cognitive hearing science; ELU model; mediation model; phonology; processing speed; working memory
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-192300 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1015227 (DOI)000953499600001 ()36936006 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150422358 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 349-2007-8654Swedish Research Council, 2017-06092
Available from: 2023-03-13 Created: 2023-03-13 Last updated: 2023-04-14
Arvola, M., Forsblad (Kristiansson), M., Wiberg, M. & Danielsson, H. (2023). Autonomous Vehicles for Children with Mild Intellectual Disability: Perplexity, Curiosity, Surprise, and Confusion. In: Alan Dix, Irene Reppa, Carina Westling, Harry Witchel, Stéphane Safin, Gerrit van der Veer, Joseph MacInnes, Harry Witchel, Raymond Bond (Ed.), Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2023: Responsible Technology Community, Culture, and Sustainability. Paper presented at European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2023 (ECCE '23), Swansea, Wales, UK, 19 – 22 September, 2023. (pp. 1-8). New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), Article ID 25.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autonomous Vehicles for Children with Mild Intellectual Disability: Perplexity, Curiosity, Surprise, and Confusion
2023 (English)In: Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2023: Responsible Technology Community, Culture, and Sustainability / [ed] Alan Dix, Irene Reppa, Carina Westling, Harry Witchel, Stéphane Safin, Gerrit van der Veer, Joseph MacInnes, Harry Witchel, Raymond Bond, New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023, p. 1-8, article id 25Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Self-driving buses will be part of the public transportation system of the future, and they must therefore be accessible to all. The study reported in this paper examines the user experiences of 16 children with mild intellectual disability riding a self-driving bus. The qualitative analysis, performed by iterative affinity diagramming, of interviews, observations, and a co-design session with five of the children, suggests that familiar situations were characterized by contemplation and curiosity, while unfamiliar ones were characterized by surprise or confusion. The temporal structure of past, present, and future situations in the field of attention played a significant role in the children’s experiences. This leads to design considerations for an explainable interior of self-driving buses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York, NY, USA: Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023
Keywords
user experience, accessibility, autonomous vehicles, intellectual disability
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-198933 (URN)10.1145/3605655.3605688 (DOI)001144182000025 ()2-s2.0-85173868591 (Scopus ID)9798400708756 (ISBN)
Conference
European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics 2023 (ECCE '23), Swansea, Wales, UK, 19 – 22 September, 2023.
Funder
Wallenberg AI, Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP)
Note

Funding: Wallenberg AI, Autonomous Systems and Software Program -Humanities and Society

Available from: 2023-11-03 Created: 2023-11-03 Last updated: 2024-02-23Bibliographically approved
Lindström-Sandahl, H., Elwér, Å., Samuelsson, S. & Danielsson, H. (2023). Effects of a phonics intervention in a randomized controlled study in Swedish second-grade students at risk of reading difficulties. Dyslexia, 29(4), 290-311
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of a phonics intervention in a randomized controlled study in Swedish second-grade students at risk of reading difficulties
2023 (English)In: Dyslexia, ISSN 1076-9242, E-ISSN 1099-0909, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 290-311Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Teaching phoneme awareness to children at risk for early reading difficulties has been recognized as successful in several studies. In this randomized controlled trial (RCT)-study, we add to this research by optimizing core procedural as well as teaching components in a phonics-directed intervention and extend the RCT reading intervention research into a semi-transparent language context. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a novel Swedish intensive phonics program. This randomized controlled pre-test and post-test intervention study targeted second-grade students with early reading difficulties. Students were identified by a repeated screening procedure and allocated to intervention (n = 34) and control (n = 34) conditions. A 9-week intensive phonics-based program was administrated one-to-one, by special education teachers in Swedish mainstream elementary schools. Results show an improvement in the intervention group, compared with the controls on all outcome measures. Findings indicate that the supplementary phonics program, delivered with high intensity, can significantly increase word reading skills and reading comprehension in second-grade students with early reading difficulties.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
decoding, dyslexia, instruction, intervention, phonology, reading
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-198196 (URN)10.1002/dys.1751 (DOI)001066030200001 ()37699729 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85170692021 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2019-03873
Note

Funding: Vetenskapsradet [2019-03873]

Available from: 2023-09-29 Created: 2023-09-29 Last updated: 2024-03-11Bibliographically approved
Witte, E., Björkstrand, T., Danielsson, H. & Holmer, E. (2023). Effects of lexical neighbourhood density and phonotactic probability studied with a new database of matched pairs of real signs and modelled pseudosigns in the Swedish Sign Language. In: Proceedings of The 16th International Cognitive Linguistics Conference: . Paper presented at The 16th International Cognitive Linguistics Conference.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of lexical neighbourhood density and phonotactic probability studied with a new database of matched pairs of real signs and modelled pseudosigns in the Swedish Sign Language
2023 (English)In: Proceedings of The 16th International Cognitive Linguistics Conference, 2023Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Keywords
Sign language, Lexical database, Pseudosign generation, Language processing, Lexical access, Neighbourhood density, Phonotactic probability, Lexical decision task
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-199878 (URN)
Conference
The 16th International Cognitive Linguistics Conference
Available from: 2024-01-02 Created: 2024-01-02 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Forsblad, M., Lindblad, P., Arvola, M., Solís-Marcos, I., Danielsson, H. & Wiberg, M. (2023). How Children With Mild Intellectual Disability Experience Self-driving Buses: In Support of Agency. Transaction on Transport Sciences, 14(2), 21-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Children With Mild Intellectual Disability Experience Self-driving Buses: In Support of Agency
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2023 (English)In: Transaction on Transport Sciences, ISSN 1802-971X, E-ISSN 1802-9876, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Emerging technology for public transportation is often not fully aligned with an inclusive design strategy. Many people with intellectual disability experience their needs and desires not being fully considered. Responding to this problem, the purpose of this study is to investigate how children with mild intellectual disability experience self-driving buses. On each bus, a person called "safety driver" monitors the ride and takes control if a problematic situation arises. The purpose is also to investigate what roles support persons and safety drivers play. In addition, the research aims to propose improvements in how the design of these self-driving buses can better motivate children with intellectual disability to use them in support of their agency. To address this, we arranged and studied seven rides on self-driving buses, for 16 children diagnosed to have mild intellectual disability, and their support persons. Interviews with the children were held after the rides, and both the rides and interviews were video recorded. The analysis was in part inductive but also employed a theory based on motivation: self-determination theory. For several children, the bus worked as a vehicle for a social sightseeing tour of the local environment, and the current design did not hinder such an experience. Overall, many of the children had a positive experience, but there is room for improvement regarding the design of the buses. Some children expressed curiosity and a few frustrations with how the bus behaved in traffic. For instance, it was difficult for the children to understand why the bus braked for things that were hard for them to perceive. From observation, it appears that the accompanying support person and safety driver played an important role in making children safe and shaping the social environment on the bus. The support persons were also essential for some children to ride the bus at all. The safety driver provided the children with information about how the bus worked. Both the safety driver and the support person had a positive impact on the children's experience. To meet the children's needs and skills, and to improve their motivation for riding the buses again, the buses need to decelerate less abruptly, have easier and consistently designed seatbelts, and communicate what they do, see, and signal more clearly. We argue that further studies at this level of detail are crucial to ensure that new technologies are indeed designed for everyone.

National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-195189 (URN)10.5507/tots.2023.002 (DOI)
Funder
Wallenberg AI, Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP)
Available from: 2023-06-16 Created: 2023-06-16 Last updated: 2024-04-17
Ritoša, A., Almqvist, L., Danielsson, H. & Granlund, M. (2023). Profiles of State and Trait Engagement of Preschool Children. Early Education and Development
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Profiles of State and Trait Engagement of Preschool Children
2023 (English)In: Early Education and Development, ISSN 1040-9289, E-ISSN 1556-6935Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Research Findings: This study examined the engagement of 494 preschool children in Sweden (M = 53.44 months, SD = 10.64) using both teacher questionnaires to measure global engagement (trait) and observations to measure momentary engagement (state). Using a person-oriented approach with cluster analysis, we identified five distinct profiles of global and momentary engagement, with four of them showing discrepancies between global and observed engagement levels. We found that age, hyperactivity, and second language learner (SLL) status were related to a specific engagement profile. Specifically, children high in hyperactivity tended to be in clusters with higher momentary engagement than global engagement, whereas second language learners were overrepresented in clusters with lower momentary engagement. Practice or Policy: The findings suggest that global and observed measures of engagement capture different aspects of children’s engagement and should not be used interchangeably. Children with low engagement ratings on both measures of engagement are more likely to have an extreme score on the global engagement measure, indicating that difficulties they experience will be more noticeable in their global engagement. On the other hand, displays of high levels of momentary engagement could signal children’s inherent potential, prompting tailored encouragement and support within Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) settings and promoting their overall engagement levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2023
National Category
Learning
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-199877 (URN)10.1080/10409289.2023.2297656 (DOI)001129330900001 ()
Available from: 2024-01-02 Created: 2024-01-02 Last updated: 2024-01-16
Danielsson, H. (2023). Randomiserade kontrollerade studier av interventionsprogram för elever med tidiga läs- och matematiksvårigheter. In: Resultatdialog 2023: Kortfattade resultat från forskning finansierad inom utbildningsvetenskap (pp. 15-18). Vetenskapsrådet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Randomiserade kontrollerade studier av interventionsprogram för elever med tidiga läs- och matematiksvårigheter
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2023 (Swedish)In: Resultatdialog 2023: Kortfattade resultat från forskning finansierad inom utbildningsvetenskap, Vetenskapsrådet , 2023, p. 15-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Forskningens syfte var att utveckla och utvärdera två interventioner för elever med tidiga lässvårigheter eller tidiga mattesvårigheter. Resultaten visade att bägge interventionerna hade en medelstor till stor effekt på förbättring för interventionsgrupperna direkt efter interventionerna. Ett år efter interventionerna hade de flesta av de positiva effekterna minskat till ungefär hälften.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vetenskapsrådet, 2023
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-199895 (URN)9789189845107 (ISBN)
Available from: 2024-01-03 Created: 2024-01-03 Last updated: 2024-02-01Bibliographically approved
Stacey, J. E., Danielsson, H., Heinrich, A., Batinović, L., Holmer, E., Ingo, E. & Henshaw, H. (2023). Relationship between self-reported listening and communication difficulties and executive function: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMJ Open, 13(11), Article ID e071225.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationship between self-reported listening and communication difficulties and executive function: a protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis
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2023 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e071225Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Listening and communication difficulties can limit people’s participation in activity and adversely affect their quality of life. Hearing, as well as listening and communication difficulties, can be measured either by using behavioural tests or self-report measures, and the outcomes are not always closely linked. The association between behaviourally measured and self-reported hearing is strong, whereas the association between behavioural and self-reported measures of listening and communication difficulties is much weaker, suggesting they assess different aspects of listening. While behavioural measures of listening and communication difficulties have been associated with poorer cognitive performance including executive functions, the same association has not always been shown for self-report measures. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to understand the relationship between executive function and self-reported listening and communication difficulties in adults with hearing loss, and where possible, potential covariates of age and pure-tone audiometric thresholds.

Methods and analysis

Studies will be eligible for inclusion if they report data from both a self-report measure of listening difficulties and a behavioural measure of executive function. Eight databases are to be searched: MEDLINE (via Ovid SP), EMBASE (via Ovid SP), PsycINFO (via Ovid SP), ASSIA (via ProQuest), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature or CINAHL (via EBSCO Host), Scopus, PubMed and Web of Science (Science and Social Science Citation Index). The JBI critical appraisal tool will be used to assess risk of bias for included studies. Results will be synthesised primarily using a meta-analysis, and where sufficient quantitative data are not available, a narrative synthesis will be carried out to describe key results.

Ethics and dissemination

No ethical issues are foreseen. Data will be disseminated via academic publication and conference presentations. Findings may also be published in scientific newsletters and magazines.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2023
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-199064 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2022-071225 (DOI)001102645200006 ()37940150 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-06092
Note

Funding: National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) [CDF- 2018- 11- ST2- 016, PB- PG- 0816- 20044]; NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre [NIHR 203310]; NIHR Manchester Biomedical Research Centre [NIHR 203308]; Swedish Research Council [2017- 06092]

Available from: 2023-11-09 Created: 2023-11-09 Last updated: 2024-05-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0446-0827

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