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Lindberg, Lars-Göran
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Publications (10 of 71) Show all publications
Glasin, J., Henricson, J., Lindberg, L.-G. & Björk Wilhelms, D. (2019). Wireless vitals: Proof of concept for wireless patient monitoring in an emergency department setting. Journal of Biophotonics, 12(4), Article ID e201800275.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wireless vitals: Proof of concept for wireless patient monitoring in an emergency department setting
2019 (English)In: Journal of Biophotonics, ISSN 1864-063X, E-ISSN 1864-0648, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e201800275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vital sign assessment is a common task in emergency medicine, but resources for continuous monitoring are restricted, data is often recorded manually, and entangled wires cause frustration. Therefore, we designed a small, wireless photoplethysmographic device capable of continuously assessing pulse, respiratory frequency and oxygen saturation on the sternum and tested the performance and feasibility in an emergency department setting. Fifty (56.3 20.2 years), consenting emergency patients (29 male) were recruited. Heart rate, respiratory rate and oxygen saturation were recorded simultaneously using the device and standard monitoring equipment. Data was compared using Bland-Altman plotting (heart rate, respiratory rate) and mean difference (oxygen saturation). The bias for heart- and respiratory rate was 0.4 (limits of agreements -11.3, 12.2 and -6.1, 7.0). Mean difference for oxygen saturation was -0.21 +/- 2.35%. This may be the first wireless device to use photoplethysmography on the sternum for vital sign assessment. We noted good agreement with standard monitors, but lack of standardization in data processing between monitoring systems may limit the generalizability of these findings. Although further improvements are needed, the feasibility of this approach provides proof of concept for a new paradigm of large scale, wireless patient monitoring.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-VCH Verlagsgesellschaft, 2019
Keywords
Emergency medicine; physiologic monitoring; Hospital emergency service; emergency medicine; humans; photoplethysmography
National Category
Other Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157243 (URN)10.1002/jbio.201800275 (DOI)000464399800012 ()30306737 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85058622127 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Region Ostergotland [LIO-532001, LIO-700271]

Available from: 2019-06-13 Created: 2019-06-13 Last updated: 2019-06-18Bibliographically approved
Edner, A., Lindberg, L.-G., Brostrom, H. & Bergh, A. (2015). Does a magnetic blanket induce changes in muscular blood flow, skin temperature and muscular tension in horses?. Equine Veterinary Journal, 47(3), 302-307
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does a magnetic blanket induce changes in muscular blood flow, skin temperature and muscular tension in horses?
2015 (English)In: Equine Veterinary Journal, ISSN 0425-1644, E-ISSN 2042-3306, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 302-307Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reasons for performing studyStatic magnetic blankets are often claimed to induce increases in blood flow, reduce muscle tension and tenderness, and be beneficial in both prevention and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries in horses. However, there are no studies that confirm alleged beneficial effects of magnets on muscles of the back in healthy horses. ObjectivesTo investigate whether static magnets sewn into a blanket affect back muscle blood flow, skin temperature, mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) and behaviour in healthy horses. Study designProspective, randomised, blinded, placebo-controlled crossover study. MethodsThe following outcome measurements of the back of 10 healthy horses were performed; blood flow by photoplethysmography, skin temperature by use of thermistors in conjunction with digital infrared thermography, and MNTs by algometry. The horses behaviour was filmed during the procedure and scored on an ethogram. Measurements were performed repeatedly for a 30min baseline period. Thereafter a blanket with active, static magnets (900 gauss) or placebo magnets was placed on the horse and measurements were performed for a 60min treatment period and a 30min post treatment period. The study procedure was repeated on the consecutive day, when the horse received the alternative treatment. ResultsBlood flow in muscle, skin temperatures, MNTs and behavioural traits did not differ between active and placebo magnetic blankets. Skin temperature increased similarly during both active and placebo blanket treatment. ConclusionsIn healthy horses, magnetic blankets did not induce additional significant effects on muscle blood flow, skin temperature, MNTs and behaviour when compared with nonmagnetic blankets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley, 2015
Keywords
horse; static magnet; photoplethysmography; thermography; algometry; behaviour
National Category
Medical Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-118036 (URN)10.1111/evj.12291 (DOI)000353237800011 ()24779912 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|SLU

Available from: 2015-05-21 Created: 2015-05-20 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Källman, U., Engström, M., Bergstrand, S., Ek, A.-C., Fredrikson, M., Lindberg, L.-G. & Lindgren, M. (2015). The Effects of Different Lying Positions on Interface Pressure, Skin Temperature, and Tissue Blood Flow in Nursing Home Residents. Biological Research for Nursing, 17(2), 142-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effects of Different Lying Positions on Interface Pressure, Skin Temperature, and Tissue Blood Flow in Nursing Home Residents
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2015 (English)In: Biological Research for Nursing, ISSN 1099-8004, E-ISSN 1552-4175, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 142-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Although repositioning is considered an important intervention to prevent pressure ulcers, tissue response during loading in different lying positions has not been adequately explored.

Aim: To compare the effects of different lying positions on interface pressure, skin temperature, and tissue blood flow in nursing home residents.

Method: From May 2011 to August 2012, interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at three tissue depths were measured for 1 hr over the sacrum in 30 supine tilt and 0 supine positions and over the trochanter major in 30lateral and 90lateral positions in 25 residents aged 65 years or older. Measurement of interface pressure was accomplished using a pneumatic pressure transmitter connected to a digital manometer, skin temperature using a temperature sensor, and blood flow using photoplethysmography and laser Doppler flowmetry.

Results: Interface pressure was significantly higher in the 0supine and 90lateral positions than in 30supine tilt and 30 lateral positions. The mean skin temperature increased from baseline in all positions. Blood flow was significantly higher in the 30 supine tilt position compared to the other positions. A hyperemic response in the post pressure period was seen at almost all tissue depths and positions.

Conclusion: The 30supine tilt position generated less interface pressure and allowed greater tissue perfusion, suggesting that this position is the most beneficial.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
Keywords
nursing home residents, patient repositioning, pressure ulcer, interface pressure, skin temperature, tissue blood flow
National Category
Clinical Medicine Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109318 (URN)10.1177/1099800414540515 (DOI)000349332300003 ()25037449 (PubMedID)
Note

The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship and/or publication of this article: This research project was funded by the Research Council, Sodra Alvsborg Hospital, Boras, Sweden [VGFOUSA-318701]; the Research Council, Ostergotland, Linkoping, Sweden [LIO-197101]; the Dermatology Department Research Foundation at Sodra Alvsborg Hospital, Boras Sweden [April 01, 2010]; the SwedBank Sjuharad Foundation for Research at the Sodra Alvsborg Hospital, Boras, Sweden [October 10, 2011]; the Sodra Alvsborg Hospital, Boras, Sweden [April 01, 2011]; the King Gustaf V and Queen Victoria's Freemason Foundation [December 2011]; the NovaMedTech and European Union-European Regional Development Fund [September 29, 2011]; Faculty of Health Science Linkoping University, Linkoping, Sweden [LIO-200671].

Available from: 2014-08-12 Created: 2014-08-12 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Bergstrand, S., Källman, U., Ek, A.-C., Lindberg, L.-G., Engström, M., Sjöberg, F. & Lindgren, M. (2014). Pressure-induced vasodilation and reactive hyperemia at different depths in sacral tissue under clinically relevant conditions. Microcirculation, 21(8), 761-771
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pressure-induced vasodilation and reactive hyperemia at different depths in sacral tissue under clinically relevant conditions
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2014 (English)In: Microcirculation, ISSN 1073-9688, E-ISSN 1549-8719, Vol. 21, no 8, p. 761-771Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To characterize pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia at different sacral tissue depths in different populations under clinically relevant pressure exposure.

METHODS: Forty-two subjects (< 65 years), 38 subjects (≥ 65 years), and 35 patients (≥ 65 years) participated. Interface pressure, skin temperature, and blood flow at tissue depths of 1 mm, 2 mm, and 10 mm (using laser Doppler flowmetry and photoplethysmography) were measured in the sacral tissue before, during, and after load in a supine position.

RESULTS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia were observed at three tissue depths. At 10 mm depth, the proportion of subjects with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation was higher compared to superficial depths. The patients had higher interface pressure during load than the healthy individuals, but there were no significant differences in blood flow. Twenty-nine subjects in all three study groups were identified with a lack of pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia.

CONCLUSIONS: pressure-induced vasodilatation and reactive hyperemia can be measured at different tissue depths. A lack of these responses was found in healthy individuals as well as in patients indicating an innate susceptibility in some individuals, and are potential important factors to evaluate in order to better understand the etiology of pressure ulcers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2014
Keywords
Pressure ulcer, photoplethysmography, laser Doppler flowmetry, non-invasive, tissue blood flow
National Category
Nursing Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109950 (URN)10.1111/micc.12160 (DOI)000344789400010 ()25100630 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-08-29 Created: 2014-08-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Schiotz Thorud, H.-M., Helland, M., Aaras, A., Kvikstad, T. M., Lindberg, L.-G. & Horgen, G. (2014). Reliability of muscle blood flow measurements in orbicularis oculi. Optometry and Vision Science, 91(9), E215-E221
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reliability of muscle blood flow measurements in orbicularis oculi
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2014 (English)In: Optometry and Vision Science, ISSN 1040-5488, E-ISSN 1538-9235, Vol. 91, no 9, p. E215-E221Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. Orbicularis oculi muscle tension and muscle blood flow have been shown to be objective measures of eyestrain during visually demanding activities, such as computer work. In line with this, positive associations between eye-related pain and muscle blood flow in orbicularis oculi have been observed. A hypothesis regarding work situations with cognitive tasks and low-level muscle activity, such as computer work, proposes that muscle pain originates from the blood vessel-nociceptor interactions of the connective tissue of the muscle. Noninvasive muscle blood flow measurements in the orbicularis oculi muscle are preferable to using an invasive technique. The aim of this study was to test reproducibility and stability of muscle blood recordings in orbicularis oculi using photoplethysmography. Methods. In the reproducibility tests, 12 subjects were tested twice within 1 to 5 weeks. To study the stability of the method, six of the subjects were randomly selected and tested four more times within 2 to 6 weeks. Test subjects were doing identical visually demanding computer work for 10 minutes in each test. Results. The short-term repeatability of muscle blood flow measurements was considered good, but the stability of blood flow recordings over time in orbicularis oculi was low because of a greater within-subject maximum variability compared with between-subject average variability. Conclusions. Investigators should be aware of the effect of time, possibly attributed to confounding factors such as environmental changes and mental stress, when comparing photoplethysmography muscle blood flow recordings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014
Keywords
eyestrain; photoplethysmography; muscle blood flow; reliability; repeatability; stability; orbicularis oculi; computer work
National Category
Medical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-111279 (URN)10.1097/OPX.0000000000000346 (DOI)000341449600001 ()25105686 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84906949206 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Norwegian Research Council [176541/V10]

Available from: 2014-10-14 Created: 2014-10-14 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Källman, U., Bergstrand, S., Ek, A.-C., Engström, M., Lindberg, L.-G. & Lindgren, M. (2013). Different lying positions and their effects on tissue blood flow and skin temperature in older adult patients. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 69(1), 133-144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Different lying positions and their effects on tissue blood flow and skin temperature in older adult patients
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2013 (English)In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 133-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim. To report a study to compare the effects of different lying positions on tissue blood flow and skin temperature in older adult patients. This article reports the evaluation of study design and procedures. Background. To reduce risk of pressure ulcers, repositioning of immobile patients is a standard nursing practice; however, research into how different lying positions effect tissue microcirculation is limited. Design. Descriptive comparative design. Methods. From MarchOctober 2010, 20 inpatients, aged 65 years or older, were included in the study. Tissue blood flow and skin temperature were measured over bony prominences and in gluteus muscle in four supine and two lateral positions. Results. The blood flow over the bony prominence areas was most influenced in the superficial skin and especially in the 30 degrees lateral position, where the blood flow decreased significantly in comparison with the supine positions. There were significant individual differences in blood flow responses, but no common trend was identified among the patients considered at risk for pressure ulcer development. The study procedure worked well and was feasible to perform in an inpatient population. Conclusion. The lying positions seem to influence the tissue blood flow over the bony prominences in different ways in older adult inpatients, but further study is needed to confirm the results and to make recommendations to clinical practice. The study procedure worked well, although some minor adjustments with regard to heat accumulation will be made in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Blackwell Publishing, 2013
Keywords
nursing, older adults, patient repositioning, pressure ulcer, prevention, skin temperature, tissue blood flow
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-87459 (URN)10.1111/j.1365-2648.2012.06000.x (DOI)000312550600013 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Research Council South Alvsborg||South Alvsborg Hospital and Dermatology Department Research Foundation||South Alvsborg Hospital, Boras||Swed Bank Sjuharads foundation for research at the hospital of South Alvsborg, Boras, Sweden||Swedish Research Council||Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoping, Sweden||

Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Pilt, K., Ferenets, R., Meigas, K., Lindberg, L.-G., Temitski, K. & Viigimaa, M. (2013). New Photoplethysmographic Signal Analysis Algorithm for Arterial Stiffness Estimation. Scientific World Journal, 2013
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New Photoplethysmographic Signal Analysis Algorithm for Arterial Stiffness Estimation
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2013 (English)In: Scientific World Journal, ISSN 1537-744X, E-ISSN 1537-744X, Vol. 2013Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to identify premature arterial stiffening is of considerable value in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. The "ageing index" (AGI), which is calculated from the second derivative photoplethysmographic (SDPPG) waveform, has been used as one method for arterial stiffness estimation and the evaluation of cardiovascular ageing. In this study, the new SDPPG analysis algorithm is proposed with optimal filtering and signal normalization in time. The filter parameters were optimized in order to achieve the minimal standard deviation of AGI, which gives more effective differentiation between the levels of arterial stiffness. As a result, the optimal low-pass filter edge frequency of 6 Hz and transitionband of 1 Hz were found, which facilitates AGI calculation with a standard deviation of 0.06. The study was carried out on 21 healthy subjects and 20 diabetes patients. The linear relationship (r = 0.91) between each subjects age and AGI was found, and a linear model with regression line was constructed. For diabetes patients, the mean AGI value difference from the proposed model y(AGI) was found to be 0.359. The difference was found between healthy and diabetes patients groups with significance level of P andlt; 0.0005.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hindawi Publishing Corporation, 2013
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-97461 (URN)10.1155/2013/169035 (DOI)000323341400001 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|Estonian Science Foundation|7506|Estonian Targeted Financing Project|SF0140027s07|European Union through the European Regional Development Fund||

Available from: 2013-09-12 Created: 2013-09-12 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Schiotz Thorud, H.-M., Helland, M., Aaras, A., Martin Kvikstad, T., Lindberg, L.-G. & Horgen, G. (2012). Eye-Related Pain Induced by Visually Demanding Computer Work. Optometry and Vision Science, 89(4), E452-E464
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eye-Related Pain Induced by Visually Demanding Computer Work
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2012 (English)In: Optometry and Vision Science, ISSN 1040-5488, E-ISSN 1538-9235, Vol. 89, no 4, p. E452-E464Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose. Eye strain during visually demanding computer work may include glare and increased squinting. The latter may be related to elevated tension in the orbicularis oculi muscle and development of muscle pain. The aim of the study was to investigate the development of discomfort symptoms in relation to muscle activity and muscle blood flow in the orbicularis oculi muscle during computer work with visual strain. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. A group of healthy young adults with normal vision was randomly selected. Eye-related symptoms were recorded during a 2-h working session on a laptop. The participants were exposed to visual stressors such as glare and small font. Muscle load and blood flow were measured by electromyography and photoplethysmography, respectively. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. During 2 h of visually demanding computer work, there was a significant increase in the following symptoms: eye-related pain and tiredness, blurred vision, itchiness, gritty eyes, photophobia, dry eyes, and tearing eyes. Muscle load in orbicularis oculi was significantly increased above baseline and stable at 1 to 1.5% maximal voluntary contraction during the working sessions. Orbicularis oculi muscle blood flow increased significantly during the first part of the working sessions before returning to baseline. There were significant positive correlations between eye-related tiredness and orbicularis oculi muscle load and eye-related pain and muscle blood flow. Subjects who developed eye-related pain showed elevated orbicularis oculi muscle blood flow during computer work, but no differences in muscle load, compared with subjects with minimal pain symptoms. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions. Eyestrain during visually demanding computer work is related to the orbicularis oculi muscle. Muscle pain development during demanding, low-force exercise is associated with increased muscle blood flow, possible secondary to different muscle activity pattern, and/or increased mental stress level in subjects experiencing pain compared with subjects with minimal pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 2012
Keywords
computer vision syndrome, eyestrain, orbicularis oculi muscle, electromyography, photoplethysmography, muscle blood flow, muscle activity, muscle pain, mental stress
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-77102 (URN)10.1097/OPX.0b013e31824c1801 (DOI)000302636600012 ()
Note
Funding Agencies|The Norwegian Research Council|176541/V10|Available from: 2012-05-04 Created: 2012-05-04 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Hagblad, J., Folke, M., Lindberg, L.-G. & Linden, M. (2012). Technical issues related to the long-term monitoring of blood flow at different depths using LDF and PPG. Physiological Measurement, 33(6), 985-996
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Technical issues related to the long-term monitoring of blood flow at different depths using LDF and PPG
2012 (English)In: Physiological Measurement, ISSN 0967-3334, E-ISSN 1361-6579, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 985-996Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to evaluate an integrated probe using LDF and multiple PPG, for the long-term aspects of skin temperature and blood flow variations at different tissue depths, and especially to investigate whether the presence of the probe affects the temperature. Measurements of temperature and blood flow were performed over 60 min on the lower back of ten subjects, lying on a mattress. The surface temperature of the skin was also measured before and after the 60 min period, and repeated with three probe configurations with the probe switched on, turned off and in the absence of a probe. A general increase in the blood flow was found to occur during the 60 min interval at all depths reached by this probe, but with variations over time. No difference was found in temperatures recorded for the different probe configurations. According to our measurements, the presence of the probe does not affect the skin surface temperature at 60 min. Our investigation shows that skin temperature can be expected to increase and approach the body core temperature by just lying in supine position on the mattress. The increase in temperature and blood flow that is known to occur, possibly attributable to pressure-induced vasodilatation, must be taken into consideration when performing these kinds of measurements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics, 2012
Keywords
blood flow measurement, photoplethysmography, laser Doppler flowmetry, temperature, pressure ulcers
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-78808 (URN)10.1088/0967-3334/33/6/985 (DOI)000304562900008 ()
Available from: 2012-06-21 Created: 2012-06-21 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Hallman, D. M., Lindberg, L.-G., Arnetz, B. B. & Lyskov, E. (2011). Effects of static contraction and cold stimulation on cardiovascular autonomic indices, trapezius blood flow and muscle activity in chronic neck-shoulder pain. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 111(8), 1725-1735
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of static contraction and cold stimulation on cardiovascular autonomic indices, trapezius blood flow and muscle activity in chronic neck-shoulder pain
2011 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 111, no 8, p. 1725-1735Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to investigate reactions in trapezius muscle blood flow (MBF), muscle activity, heart rate variability (HRV) and systemic blood pressure (BP) to autonomic tests in subjects with chronic neck-shoulder pain and healthy controls. Changes in muscle activity and blood flow due to stress and unfavourable muscle loads are known underlying factors of work-related muscle pain. Aberration of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is considered a possible mechanism. In the present study, participants (n = 23 Pain, n = 22 Control) performed autonomic tests which included a resting condition, static hand grip test (HGT) at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction, a cold pressor test (CPT) and a deep breathing test (DBT). HRV was analysed in time and frequency domains. MBF and muscle activity were recorded from the upper trapezius muscles using photoplethysmography and electromyography (EMG). The pain group showed reduced low frequency-HRV (LF) and SDNN during rest, as well as a blunted BP response and increased LF-HRV during HGT (a dagger systolic 22 mm Hg; a dagger LF(nu) 27%) compared with controls (a dagger systolic 27; a dagger LF(nu) 6%). Locally, the pain group had attenuated trapezius MBF in response to HGT (Pain 122% Control 140%) with elevated trapezius EMG following HGT and during CPT. In conclusion, only HGT showed differences between groups in systemic BP and HRV and alterations in local trapezius MBF and EMG in the pain group. Findings support the hypothesis of ANS involvement at systemic and local levels in chronic neck-shoulder pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Verlag (Germany), 2011
Keywords
Muscle pain, Sympathetic, Heart rate variability, PPG, Electromyography
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-70336 (URN)10.1007/s00421-010-1813-z (DOI)000293980000019 ()
Available from: 2011-09-02 Created: 2011-09-02 Last updated: 2017-12-08
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