liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Grandin, Ingemar
Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Grandin, I. (2018). Anna Marie Stirr. 2017. Singing Across Divides: Music and Intimate Politics in Nepal, reviewed by Ingemar Grandin [Review]. Studies in Nepali History and Society, 23(2), 485-491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anna Marie Stirr. 2017. Singing Across Divides: Music and Intimate Politics in Nepal, reviewed by Ingemar Grandin
2018 (English)In: Studies in Nepali History and Society, ISSN 1025-5109, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 485-491Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kathmandu: Mandala Book Point, 2018
Keywords
Anthropology of music, Nepal, dohori (språk=nepali)
National Category
Musicology Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-157085 (URN)
Available from: 2019-05-27 Created: 2019-05-27 Last updated: 2019-06-05Bibliographically approved
Grandin, I. (2015). A Young Person’s Guide to the Cultural Heritage of the Kathmandu Valley: The Song Kaulā Kachalā and Its Video. Studies in Nepali History and Society, 19 (2014)(2), 231-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Young Person’s Guide to the Cultural Heritage of the Kathmandu Valley: The Song Kaulā Kachalā and Its Video
2015 (English)In: Studies in Nepali History and Society, ISSN 1025-5109, Vol. 19 (2014), no 2, p. 231-267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is no doubt that the Newar culture of the Kathmandu Valley has attracted a lot of scholarly attention. The presentation of Newar culture in focus here, however, is very different from the scholarly literature. It is made for Newars by Newars; it is in the form of a song with a video, not a scholarly text; and it is a presentation for children, not for learned readers. The song is called Kaulā Kachalā. Within its small format, this song video plays up a very rich picture of Newar civilization and is positioned in and illuminates important problem areas and debates such as ethnic politics and cultural heritage, and cultural vulnerability and sustainability. 

Keywords
Nepal, Newars, Music, Music video, Ethnic politics, Cultural heritage, Cultural sustainability
National Category
Specific Literatures
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-123364 (URN)
Note

Date of actual publication: 13 december 2015

Available from: 2015-12-14 Created: 2015-12-13 Last updated: 2016-11-10Bibliographically approved
Economou, K. & Grandin, I. (2013). Kultur och mediegestaltning: Tvärvetenskaplighet och tvärmedialitet inom ett nytt akademiskt "kulturämne". Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, 22(1), 15-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kultur och mediegestaltning: Tvärvetenskaplighet och tvärmedialitet inom ett nytt akademiskt "kulturämne"
2013 (Swedish)In: Kulturella perspektiv - Svensk etnologisk tidskrift, ISSN 1102-7908, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 15-17Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Umeå: Föreningen Kulturella perspektiv, 2013
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-107204 (URN)
Available from: 2014-06-09 Created: 2014-06-09 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Grandin, I. (2012). Between the market and Comrade Mao: Newar cultural activism and ethnic/political movements. Paper presented at ASA 12. Arts and aesthetics in a globalising world. New Delhi, Jawaharlal Nehru University, April 3-6 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Between the market and Comrade Mao: Newar cultural activism and ethnic/political movements
2012 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Newars are prominent in the ethnic and indigenous (janajati/adivasi) movement in Nepal. With their heartland in the country's capital area, the Kathmandu Valley, their position is contradictory: they are part of the economic, political and cultural elite yet dominated in numerous ways. Still in the 1940s, people went to jail for publishing literary works in Newari, and the Newar struggle for recognition, identity, and cultural survival - often linked with leftist, political movements - has taken many forms since then. Cultural activism is prominent among these forms.

This contribution studies Newar cultural activism as an artistic, aesthetic practice. This practice includes songs, cultural programs, music, dance, theatre, but also media artifacts such as cassettes, cds, video-cds, and recordings and "visualizations" for broadcasting purposes. Not only song texts, but also such things as musical resources and non-verbal statements in dress and dance are meaningful here and important to analyze.

The contribution builds upon ethnographic research from the mid 1980s and into the present day. This period has seen a transformation in political terms from absolutism to democratic republicanism with Maoism as perhaps the most important base for political ideology. But equally important, economic transformations have come to challenge the very roots of the traditional agro-urban civilization of the Newar heartland. In this light, cultural activism is one way to negotiate a position for the Newars and their heritage between the economic forces of the market and the ideological offensive of Comrade Mao's followers.

Keywords
Nepal, Newar, ethnic movement, indigenous people, janajat, adivasi
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Music
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-76850 (URN)
Conference
ASA 12. Arts and aesthetics in a globalising world. New Delhi, Jawaharlal Nehru University, April 3-6 2012
Available from: 2012-04-20 Created: 2012-04-20 Last updated: 2018-01-12
Grandin, I. (2012). Kultursällskapet regnbågen, k. Mao och kulturarvsvärnets (bakvända) dialektik. In: Svante Beckman (Ed.), Beckman S (Ed.), Kulturaliseringens samhälle: Problemorienterad kulturvetenskaplig forskning vid Tema Q 2002 - 2012. Paper presented at Tema Q jubileumssymposium 19 – 20 januari 2012 (pp. 150-153). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kultursällskapet regnbågen, k. Mao och kulturarvsvärnets (bakvända) dialektik
2012 (Swedish)In: Kulturaliseringens samhälle: Problemorienterad kulturvetenskaplig forskning vid Tema Q 2002 - 2012 / [ed] Beckman S, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012, p. 150-153Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2012
Series
Linköping Electronic Conference Proceedings, ISSN 1650-3686, E-ISSN 1650-3740 ; 66
Keywords
Nepal, cultural activism, political activism
National Category
Musicology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-74138 (URN)978-91-977275-2-5 (ISBN)
Conference
Tema Q jubileumssymposium 19 – 20 januari 2012
Available from: 2012-01-19 Created: 2012-01-19 Last updated: 2018-01-12
Grandin, I. (2012). REVEIW: Sugata saurabha. An Epic Poem from Nepal on the Life of the Buddha by Chittadhar Hṛdaya. Translation by Todd T. Lewis & Subarna Man Tuladhar; Introduction and Part II by Todd T. Lewis. Oxford: Oxford University Press 2010. AND Sugata saurabha. An Epic Poem from Nepal on the Life of the Buddha by Chittadhar Hṛdaya. Annotated Newari-English translation and introduction by Todd T. Lewis & Subarna Man Tuladhar. Harvard Oriental Series, vol 67. Cambridge, Mass.: Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies, Harvard University/Harvard University Press 2007 [Review]. European Bulletin of Himalayan Research, 40(Spring-summer), 128-133
Open this publication in new window or tab >>REVEIW: Sugata saurabha. An Epic Poem from Nepal on the Life of the Buddha by Chittadhar Hṛdaya. Translation by Todd T. Lewis & Subarna Man Tuladhar; Introduction and Part II by Todd T. Lewis. Oxford: Oxford University Press 2010. AND Sugata saurabha. An Epic Poem from Nepal on the Life of the Buddha by Chittadhar Hṛdaya. Annotated Newari-English translation and introduction by Todd T. Lewis & Subarna Man Tuladhar. Harvard Oriental Series, vol 67. Cambridge, Mass.: Department of Sanskrit and Indian Studies, Harvard University/Harvard University Press 2007
2012 (English)In: European Bulletin of Himalayan Research, ISSN 0943-8254, Vol. 40, no Spring-summer, p. 128-133Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Keywords
Newars, Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, Buddhism, Music
National Category
Musicology Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-84525 (URN)
Available from: 2012-10-11 Created: 2012-10-11 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Grandin, I. (2011). Ethnic Activism and Civil Society in South Asia (D Gellner, ed) AND Varieties of Activist Experience: Civil Society in South Asia (D Gellner, ed). REVIEW [Review]. European Bulletin of Himalayan Research, 38(Spring-Summer), 175-178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnic Activism and Civil Society in South Asia (D Gellner, ed) AND Varieties of Activist Experience: Civil Society in South Asia (D Gellner, ed). REVIEW
2011 (English)In: European Bulletin of Himalayan Research, ISSN 0943-8254, Vol. 38, no Spring-Summer, p. 175-178Article, book review (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
South Asia Institute, Heidelberg University, 2011
Keywords
South Asia, Civil society, Ethnicity
National Category
Ethnology Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73793 (URN)
Available from: 2012-01-13 Created: 2012-01-13 Last updated: 2017-12-08
Grandin, I. (2011). IMER’s world. Social scientific universalism and /post/colonial hegemonies. Paper presented at Motstånd och särskiljandets praktik – rasism och antirasism då och nu.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>IMER’s world. Social scientific universalism and /post/colonial hegemonies
2011 (English)Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

IMER’s world. Social scientific universalism and /post/colonial hegemonies

IMER studies in Sweden have been vocal in unearthing data, proposing analytical frameworks and seeking out theoretical perspectives that counter racism and Swedish ethnocentrism. In this contribution, the discussion of post-colonial theory, universalism and hegemony will be grounded in an examination of IMER research and of how it relates to social science as an international field.

 

Contemporary social science works within Western hegemony. Heuristically, I think of three hegemonic layers here, each with its intrinsic forms of racism. First, the US hegemony of the post-colonial era. Second, the British hegemony that has lived on from the colonial era to be surprisingly strong today. And finally, a third hegemonic layer centering upon Western Europe.

 

So one central question motivating my contribution is, how does IMER position itself vis-à-vis these layers of world hegemony?

 

This means turning the searchlight 180 degrees, to fall upon ourselves as practitioners. The examination does not so much dwell upon what we say (describe, analyze, theorize) as upon what we do: which authors we cite, whom we invite as keynote speakers to our conferences, where we go for empirical research or for guest scholarships, the international networks we build and so on.

 

Social science operates on the premise of universalism. I don’t think here of the grand universalism – universal truths, science as supreme knowledge, and so on – that post-modernist and social constructionists have done so much to dismantle. But rather of the mundane universalism of everyday social scientific practice. We assume that social scientific theories, methods, textbooks, foundational canons and so on do not stop at linguistic, cultural or national borders. (We do not map out theoretically in which countries discourse analysis is an appropriate methodology, and where not.) And no geographical limitations are articulated when such terms as supply, demand, identity, gender, social capital, ethnicity, social structure or society are used to delineate research fields (”international migration and ethnic relations”), bring people together for conferences, give name to journals (”Ethnic and Racial Studies”), and serve as keywords for scientific articles.

 

So we will look at the way this universalism operates in social scientific practice and go on to ask, what role has social scientific universalism in maintaining the three layers of Western world hegemony?

 

The research presented in my contribution is based on the examination of IMER events, IMER publications, and the trajectories of scholars. This is mapped upon centers and peripheries of the three layered world hegemony as outlined above. For instance, from the citations in key IMER publications I map out the geographical areas where cited authors have their professional affiliation, and more specifically from which places empirical parallels are drawn, and where we find theory. If the subaltern speaks, do we listen?

 

In the concluding discussion, I use the results of this research to address the workshop’s defining question about post-colonial theory and racism.

Keywords
Structural racism, International publishing, Colonialism, Postcolonialism, Hegemony
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73795 (URN)
Conference
Motstånd och särskiljandets praktik – rasism och antirasism då och nu
Available from: 2012-01-13 Created: 2012-01-13 Last updated: 2012-05-08
Grandin, I. (2011). Local cultural activism and the production of public meaning: a Kirtipur case study. Paper presented at Creation of Public Meaning during Nepal's Democratic Transition.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Local cultural activism and the production of public meaning: a Kirtipur case study
2011 (English)In: / [ed] Michael Hutt (SOAS, London), Pratyoush Onta (Martin Chautari, Kathmandu), 2011Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Local cultural activism and the production of public meaning: a Kirtipur case study

Ingemar Grandin, Linköpings universitet, Sweden

This contribution studies Nepal’s democratic transition as it is articulated and interpreted in local cultural production. The town of Kirtipur is a good case of this. Cultural activism voicing both political and ethnic issues is a longstanding tradition here, and is tied in with other ways of creating public history. To give an example, the names of the four Kirtipur martyrs (shahid) of the Jana Andolan of 1990 are perpetuated not only in memorialising cultural programs but also in the very name of a successful local school.

Kirtipur cultural activists have navigated through the sometimes turbulent years of post-pancayat Nepal, actively relating to events such as the Jana Andolans and their aftermaths, the Gyanendra era with its curfews, and the advent of the Maovadis. Commenting, arguing, and reflecting upon such events but also upon more general social and cultural conditions, they have performed from makeshift local stages such as a water tank or a crossroads as well as on more formal stages in Kathmandu. As they go by, they forge links and make alliances with people (songwriters, dance directors, in theatre) and organisations (cultural, educational, political) who operate on a translocal or national level. But still the Kirtipur scene remains very much a locally situated practice.

Beside the ”live” cultural programs, the output of this practice includes media artifacts such as cassettes, cds, video-cds, and recordings and visualisations for broadcasting purposes. In both media artifacts and live programs, songs are the single most important component. New songs are continuously devised, but the Kirtipur cultural activists also draw upon an accumulated, large repertory from which items can be mobilised when the situation so calls for. 

Grounded in in both historical and local/national contexts, my analysis of this cultural practice and these cultural products aim for the stories they tell about, and the meanings they give to, the sociopolitical conditions, developments and events of the recent decades. My contribution builds upon familiarity with cultural activism, in Kirtipur and on a more national (i.e. Kathmandu) level, and the empirical material has been collected in 2010 as well as intermittently throughout the transition period (and back into the late days of the pancayat era). The data include song texts as copied in notebooks, printed or the like; songs as sung at programs or demonstrated at home (and recorded by me) but also as preserved on local recordings or brought out on commercially available cassettes, cds and videos; programs as observed live and as seen on local recordings. In my study of the local production of public meaning here, not only texts, but also musical resources such as melodies and instruments and the non-verbal statements in dress and dance will be ”decoded”. And finally, not only the artifacts but also the practice of cultural activism itself (as observed and as inferred from interview data) will be ”read” as a running commentary on Nepal’s democratic transition. The very decision to stage a program or write a song at a particular moment can be understood as a statement on how that transition is seen to proceed. 

Keywords
Ethnic activism, Maoism, Communism, Cultural activism, Nepal, Newars, Kathmandu Valley, Music, Literature
National Category
Musicology Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73794 (URN)
Conference
Creation of Public Meaning during Nepal's Democratic Transition
Projects
The creation of public meaning during Nepal's democratic transition
Available from: 2012-01-13 Created: 2012-01-13 Last updated: 2012-05-08
Grandin, I. (2011). Music and media in local life: music practice in a Newar neighbourhood in Nepal (2ed.). Kathmandu: Mandala Book Point
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Music and media in local life: music practice in a Newar neighbourhood in Nepal
2011 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This books presents the musical life of the Newar town of Kirtipur, Nepal. Newar musical traditions are prominent in the local musical life, and this heritage is presented in some detail in the book. Between the vivacious peaks of musical activity from the traditional ensembles, however, modern music from radios and cassette-players take over much of the town’s soundscape. So the role of the media in local musical life is the book’s second major theme. A third major theme is how the vibrant ethnic and political movements help shape the town’s musical activity.With their rich and complex civilization, the Newars have given the Kathmandu Valley of Nepal much of its unique culture and cultural heritage. Music and media in local life was first published in 1989, and is still today the only study of Newar musical life in a full book format. This is the second, updated edition of the book.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kathmandu: Mandala Book Point, 2011. p. 373 + xlvi Edition: 2
Keywords
Music, Media, Nepal, Newars, Kathmandu Valley, Political activism, Ethnicity, Ethnic activism
National Category
Musicology Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-73800 (URN)9789994655175 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-01-13 Created: 2012-01-13 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications