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Harder, Henrik
Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Asp, F., Mäki-Torkko, E., Karltorp, E., Harder, H., Hergils, L., Eskilsson, G. & Stenfelt, S. (2015). A longitudinal study of the bilateral benefit in children with bilateral cochlear implants. International Journal of Audiology, 54(2), 77-88
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A longitudinal study of the bilateral benefit in children with bilateral cochlear implants
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 54, no 2, p. 77-88Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To study the development of the bilateral benefit in children using bilateral cochlear implants by measurements of speech recognition and sound localization. Design: Bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet, in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization was measured at three occasions during a two-year period, without controlling for age or implant experience. Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses were performed. Results were compared to cross-sectional data from children with normal hearing. Study sample: Seventy-eight children aged 5.1-11.9 years, with a mean bilateral cochlear implant experience of 3.3 years and a mean age of 7.8 years, at inclusion in the study. Thirty children with normal hearing aged 4.8-9.0 years provided normative data. Results: For children with cochlear implants, bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet was comparable whereas a bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization was found at all three test occasions. Absolute performance was lower than in children with normal hearing. Early bilateral implantation facilitated sound localization. Conclusions: A bilateral benefit for speech recognition in noise and sound localization continues to exist over time for children with bilateral cochlear implants, but no relative improvement is found after three years of bilateral cochlear implant experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Bilateral cochlear implants; children; release from masking; sound localization
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-114231 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2014.973536 (DOI)000347971300003 ()25428567 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Tysta Skolan Foundation; Stockholm County Council; Karolinska Institutet; Karolinska University Hospital

Available from: 2015-02-16 Created: 2015-02-16 Last updated: 2017-12-04
Mäki-Torkko, E., Vestergren, S., Harder, H. & Lyxell, B. (2015). From isolation and dependence to autonomy - expectations before and experiences after cochlear implantation in adult cochlear implant users and their significant others. Disability and Rehabilitation, 37(6), 541-547
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From isolation and dependence to autonomy - expectations before and experiences after cochlear implantation in adult cochlear implant users and their significant others
2015 (English)In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 37, no 6, p. 541-547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of the study was to examine pre-operative expectations and the postoperative experiences related to cochlear implants (CI) in CI-users and their significant others. Methods: A questionnaire was used and the responses were analysed by means of The Qualitative Content Analysis. All adults implanted between 1992 and 2010, who had had their implants for a minimum of 12 months (n = 120) were contacted. Response rate was high (90.8%), and all-inclusive answers were received from 101 CI-users (84.2%). Results: The overall sense of increased well-being and life satisfaction was described as having lived in two different worlds, one with the auditory stimulation and one without. In the overall sense of increased well-being and satisfaction three interwoven subcategories, alienation - normality, fear - autonomy, and living a social life emerged. When CI-users and their significant others recalled the time prior to receiving the CI, a sense of fear was present with origins in the concern for the respondents (CI-users) ability to cope and care independently in society. Conversely, after the implantation both parties emphasized the notion of a distinct transformation within the CI-user towards autonomy. Communication was highlighted as a large part of living social life. Conclusion: The CI increases well-being and satisfaction for both CI-users and their significant others, which is especially evident regarding enhanced autonomy, normality and living social life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2015
Keywords
Autonomy; cochlear implant; experience; hearing loss; well-being
National Category
Clinical Medicine Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-116978 (URN)10.3109/09638288.2014.935490 (DOI)000351007500009 ()24989065 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Association of Hard of Hearing People; Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research [2010-0761]

Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-10 Last updated: 2018-09-06
Edfeldt, L., Stromback, K., Grendin, J., Bunne, M., Harder, H., Peebo, M., . . . Konradsson, K. (2014). Evaluation of cost-utility in middle ear implantation in the Nordic School: a multicenter study in Sweden and Norway. Acta Oto-Laryngologica, 134(1), 19-25
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of cost-utility in middle ear implantation in the Nordic School: a multicenter study in Sweden and Norway
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2014 (English)In: Acta Oto-Laryngologica, ISSN 0001-6489, E-ISSN 1651-2251, Vol. 134, no 1, p. 19-25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Conclusion: Hearing restoration using an active middle ear implant (AMEI) is a highly cost-effective treatment for a selected group of patients with no other possibilities for auditory rehabilitation. Objectives: To evaluate the cost-utility of using an AMEI for hearing rehabilitation. Methods: This was a prospective, multicenter, single-subject repeated study in six tertiary referral centers. Twenty-four patients with sensorineural (SNHL), conductive (CHL), and mixed hearing loss (MHL) were implanted with the AMEI Vibrant Soundbridge (R) (VSB) for medical reasons. All patients were previously rehabilitated with conventional hearing aids. Multiple validated quality of life patient questionnaires, Health Utilities Index (HUI 2 and 3), and Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile (GHABP) were used to determine the utility gain and quality adjusted life years (QALY). Directly related treatment costs for the implantation were calculated and related to utility gain and QALY. Results: The cost/QALY for patients with SNHL was estimated at (sic)7260/QALY, and for patients with C/MHL at (sic)12 503/QALY.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2014
Keywords
Active middle ear implant; sensorineural hearing loss; conductive and mixed hearing loss; quality of life
National Category
Health Sciences Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-103713 (URN)10.3109/00016489.2013.834459 (DOI)000329058700004 ()
Available from: 2014-01-24 Created: 2014-01-24 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Pettersson, D., Mathiesen, T., Prochazka, M., Bergenheim, T., Florentzson, R., Harder, H., . . . Feychting, M. (2014). Long-term Mobile Phone Use and Acoustic Neuroma Risk. Epidemiology, 25(2), 233-241
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term Mobile Phone Use and Acoustic Neuroma Risk
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2014 (English)In: Epidemiology, ISSN 1044-3983, E-ISSN 1531-5487, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: There is concern about potential effects of radiofrequency fields generated by mobile phones on cancer risk. Most previous studies have found no association between mobile phone use and acoustic neuroma, although information about long-term use is limited. Methods: We conducted a population-based, nation-wide, case-control study of acoustic neuroma in Sweden. Eligible cases were persons aged 20 to 69 years, who were diagnosed between 2002 and 2007. Controls were randomly selected from the population registry, matched on age, sex, and residential area. Postal questionnaires were completed by 451 cases (83%) and 710 controls (65%). Results: Ever having used mobile phones regularly (defined as weekly use for at least 6 months) was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.18 (95% confidence interval = 0.88 to 1.59). The association was weaker for the longest induction time (10 years) (1.11 [0.76 to 1.61]) and for regular use on the tumor side (0.98 [0.68 to 1.43]). The OR for the highest quartile of cumulative calling time (680 hours) was 1.46 (0.98 to 2.17). Restricting analyses to histologically confirmed cases reduced all ORs; the OR for 680 hours was 1.14 (0.63 to 2.07). A similar pattern was seen for cordless land-line phones, although with slightly higher ORs. Analyses of the complete history of laterality of mobile phone revealed considerable bias in laterality analyses. Conclusions: The findings do not support the hypothesis that long-term mobile phone use increases the risk of acoustic neuroma. The study suggests that phone use might increase the likelihood that an acoustic neuroma case is detected and that there could be bias in the laterality analyses performed in previous studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott, Williams andamp; Wilkins, 2014
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105747 (URN)10.1097/EDE.0000000000000058 (DOI)000331098600013 ()
Available from: 2014-04-07 Created: 2014-04-04 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Fisher, J. L., Pettersson, D., Palmisano, S., Schwartzbaum, J. A., Edwards, C. G., Mathiesen, T., . . . Feychting, M. (2014). Loud Noise Exposure and Acoustic Neuroma. American Journal of Epidemiology, 180(1), 58-67
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Loud Noise Exposure and Acoustic Neuroma
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2014 (English)In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 180, no 1, p. 58-67Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The results from studies of loud noise exposure and acoustic neuroma are conflicting. A population-based case-control study of 451 acoustic neuroma patients and 710 age-, sex-, and region-matched controls was conducted in Sweden between 2002 and 2007. Occupational exposure was based on historical measurements of occupational noise (321 job titles summarized by a job exposure matrix) and compared with self-reported occupational noise exposure. We also evaluated self-reported noise exposure during leisure activity. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios. There was no statistically significant association between acoustic neuroma and persistent occupational noise exposure, either with or without hearing protection. Exposure to loud noise from leisure activity without hearing protection was more common among acoustic neuroma cases (odds ratio = 1.47, 95% confidence interval: 1.06, 2.03). Statistically significant odds ratios were found for specific leisure activities including attending concerts/clubs/sporting events (odds ratio = 1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.09, 3.04) and participating in workouts accompanied by loud music (odds ratio = 2.84, 95% confidence interval: 1.37, 5.89). Our findings do not support an association between occupational exposure to loud noise and acoustic neuroma. Although we report statistically significant associations between leisure-time exposures to loud noise without hearing protection and acoustic neuroma, especially among women, we cannot rule out recall bias as an alternative explanation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press (OUP): Policy B - Oxford Open Option B, 2014
Keywords
acoustic neuroma; noise; occupation; vestibular schwannoma
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109887 (URN)10.1093/aje/kwu081 (DOI)000339808200009 ()24786799 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Swedish Council for Working Life and Social Research; Ohio State University James Cancer Hospital; Solove Research Institute

Available from: 2014-08-28 Created: 2014-08-28 Last updated: 2017-12-05
Asp, F., Mäki-Torkko, E., Karltorp, E., Harder, H., Hergils, L., Eskilsson, G. & Stenfelt, S. (2012). Bilateral versus unilateral cochlear implants in children: Speech recognition, sound localization, and parental reports. International Journal of Audiology, 51(11), 817-832
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bilateral versus unilateral cochlear implants in children: Speech recognition, sound localization, and parental reports
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2012 (English)In: International Journal of Audiology, ISSN 1499-2027, E-ISSN 1708-8186, Vol. 51, no 11, p. 817-832Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To compare bilateral and unilateral speech recognition in quiet and in multi-source noise, and horizontal sound localization of low and high frequency sounds in children with bilateral cochlear implants. Design: Bilateral performance was compared to performance of the implanted side with the best monaural speech recognition in quiet result. Parental reports were collected in a questionnaire. Results from the CI children were compared to binaural and monaural performance of normal-hearing peers. Study sample: Sixty-four children aged 5.1-11.9 years who were daily users of bilateral cochlear implants. Thirty normal-hearing children aged 4.8-9.0 years were recruited as controls. Results and Conclusions : Group data showed a statistically significant bilateral speech recognition and sound localization benefit, both behaviorally and in parental reports. The bilateral speech recognition benefit was smaller in quiet than in noise. The majority of subjects localized high and low frequency sounds significantly better than chance using bilateral implants, while localization accuracy was close to chance using unilateral implants. Binaural normal-hearing performance was better than bilateral performance in implanted children across tests, while bilaterally implanted children showed better localization than normal-hearing children under acute monaural conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa Healthcare, 2012
Keywords
Bilateral cochlear implants, children, release from masking, sound localization, parental reports
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-85292 (URN)10.3109/14992027.2012.705898 (DOI)000309746600004 ()
Note

Funding Agencies|ALF grants from Stockholm City Council||

Available from: 2012-11-19 Created: 2012-11-15 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Mäki-Torkko, E., Harder, H., Bergman, P. & Lyxell, B. (2012). Improved speech recognition and good self-reported benefit from cochlear implantation in adults. In: : . Paper presented at AHS 2012 - 2nd International Conference on Adult Hearing Screening, 7-9 June 2012, Cernobbio, Lake Como, Italy (pp. 77).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improved speech recognition and good self-reported benefit from cochlear implantation in adults
2012 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105104 (URN)
Conference
AHS 2012 - 2nd International Conference on Adult Hearing Screening, 7-9 June 2012, Cernobbio, Lake Como, Italy
Note

Poster nr 37

Available from: 2014-03-07 Created: 2014-03-07 Last updated: 2014-03-19
Palmisano, S., Schwartzbaum, J., Prochazka, M., Pettersson, D., Bergenheim, T., Florentzson, R., . . . Feychting, M. (2012). Role of Tobacco Use in the Etiology of Acoustic Neuroma. American Journal of Epidemiology, 175(12), 1243-1251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Role of Tobacco Use in the Etiology of Acoustic Neuroma
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2012 (English)In: American Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0002-9262, E-ISSN 1476-6256, Vol. 175, no 12, p. 1243-1251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Two previous studies suggest that cigarette smoking reduces acoustic neuroma risk; however, an association between use of snuff tobacco and acoustic neuroma has not been investigated previously. The authors conducted a case-control study in Sweden from 2002 to 2007, in which 451 cases and 710 population-based controls completed questionnaires. Cases and controls were matched on gender, region, and age within 5 years. The authors estimated odds ratios using conditional logistic regression analyses, adjusted for education and tobacco use (snuff use in the smoking analysis and smoking in the snuff analysis). The risk of acoustic neuroma was greatly reduced in male current smokers (odds ratio (OR) = 0.41, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.23, 0.74) and moderately reduced in female current smokers (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.40, 1.23). In contrast, current snuff use among males was not associated with risk of acoustic neuroma (OR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.57, 1.55). The authors findings are consistent with previous reports of lower acoustic neuroma risk among current cigarette smokers than among never smokers. The absence of an association between snuff use and acoustic neuroma suggests that some constituent of tobacco smoke other than nicotine may confer protection against acoustic neuroma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press (OUP): Policy B, 2012
Keywords
acoustic neuroma; cigarette smoking; smoking; snuff; snus; Swedish snuff; tobacco; vestibular schwannoma
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-79796 (URN)10.1093/aje/kwr465 (DOI)000305419400005 ()
Available from: 2012-08-17 Created: 2012-08-14 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Granath, A., Cardell, L.-O., Uddman, R. & Harder, H. (2011). Letter: Altered Toll- and Nod-like receptor expression in human middle ear mucosa from patients with chronic middle ear disease [Letter to the editor]. Journal of Infection, 63(2), 174-176
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Letter: Altered Toll- and Nod-like receptor expression in human middle ear mucosa from patients with chronic middle ear disease
2011 (English)In: Journal of Infection, ISSN 0163-4453, E-ISSN 1532-2742, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 174-176Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

n/a

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-69981 (URN)10.1016/j.jinf.2011.06.006 (DOI)000293273600011 ()
Available from: 2011-08-12 Created: 2011-08-12 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Mäki-Torkko, E., Harder, H., Bergström, P. & Lyxell, B. (2011). Outcome of cochlear implants in elderly adults. In: First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication: . Paper presented at First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, June 19-22, 2011, Linköping, Sweden (pp. 89-89).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Outcome of cochlear implants in elderly adults
2011 (English)In: First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, 2011, p. 89-89Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The proportion of elderly population increases and an increasing number of old adults have severe to profound hearing impairment, thus being possible cochlear implant (CI) candidates. The aim of the project was to assess the outcome of CI in terms of speech audiometric results and self-reported benefit in adults with a special emphasis on elderly adults.Subjects and methods: All 124 adult patients (≥ 18 years at implantation) who have been implanted in the Linköping CI program in 1992-2009 were eligible for the study. In addition to audiological tests, the pre-operative assessment of adult patients includes tests of working memory capacity, phonological and lexical processing skills. Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), a self-assessment instrument covering general health, degree of social support and physical state, was mailed to the CI recipients.Results: Response rate was high (90%) and 43 of the participants were ≥ 65 years. The mean time the participants had used their CI was 5.1 years (SD 4, range 1.2-16.9). All patients, with one exception, reached some degree of open set speech recognition. GBI results were comparable to earlier reports in CI populations. Analyses of the cognitive test results and more detailed analyses of speech reception and GBI among the oldest olds (≥75 years) will be reported.Discussion: According to our preliminary results, CI gives good benefit in the whole group. Provided that a careful assessment of cognitive abilities has been made and general health is reasonably good, a good outcome can be expected also in the oldest part of the population.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-105105 (URN)
Conference
First International Conference on Cognitive Hearing Science for Communication, June 19-22, 2011, Linköping, Sweden
Available from: 2014-03-07 Created: 2014-03-07 Last updated: 2014-03-19Bibliographically approved
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