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Yngman Uhlin, Pia
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Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Lindström, S. B., Uhlin, F., Bjarnegård, N., Gylling, M., Nilsson, K., Svensson, C., . . . Länne, T. (2018). Computer-Aided Evaluation of Blood Vessel Geometry From Acoustic Images. Journal of ultrasound in medicine, 37(4), 1025-1031
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer-Aided Evaluation of Blood Vessel Geometry From Acoustic Images
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2018 (English)In: Journal of ultrasound in medicine, ISSN 0278-4297, E-ISSN 1550-9613, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 1025-1031Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A method for computer-aided assessment of blood vessel geometries based on shape-fitting algorithms from metric vision was evaluated. Acoustic images of cross sections of the radial artery and cephalic vein were acquired, and medical practitioners used a computer application to measure the wall thickness and nominal diameter of these blood vessels with a caliper method and the shape-fitting method. The methods performed equally well for wall thickness measurements. The shape-fitting method was preferable for measuring the diameter, since it reduced systematic errors by up to 63% in the case of the cephalic vein because of its eccentricity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
blood vessel wall, computer-aided assessment, informatics/image processing, lumen diameter, peripheral vascular, shape fitting
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-144016 (URN)10.1002/jum.14439 (DOI)000428445900024 ()29027696 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-01-03 Created: 2018-01-03 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Stenlund, M., Sjödahl, R. & Yngman Uhlin, P. (2017). Incidence and potential risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia in an emergency department of surgery. International Journal for Quality in Health Care, 29(2), 290-294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incidence and potential risk factors for hospital-acquired pneumonia in an emergency department of surgery
2017 (English)In: International Journal for Quality in Health Care, ISSN 1353-4505, E-ISSN 1464-3677, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 290-294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) is associated with high mortality and is the second most common nosocomial infection. The aim of this study was to calculate the incidence and to identify potential risk factors for HAP in an emergency ward for surgical patients admitted because of acute abdomen or trauma. A structured review of medical records was conducted. Patients diagnosed with pneumonia amp;gt; 48 h after admittance, were compared with a randomly chosen age-matched reference group. Ten variables judged as potential risk factors for HAP were studied in 90 patients. An emergency ward for surgical patients with acute abdomen or trauma at an Univerity hospital in Sweden. A total of 90 patients with HAP and 120 age-matched controls were included. Risk factors for HAP in patients at a surgical clinic. Of a total of 10 335 admitted patients, during 4.5 years the hospital stay was longer than 48 h in 4961 patients. Of these 90 (1.8%) fulfilled the strict criteria for HAP. Potential risk factors were suspected or verified aspiration (odds ratio (OR): 23.9) that was 2-fold higher than immobilization (OR: 11.2). Further, chronic pulmonary obstructive disease (COPD)/asthma, abdominal surgery and gastric retention/vomiting were risk factors for HAP. Verified or suspected aspiration was the dominating risk factor for HAP but also immobilization was frequently associated with HAP. Various established preventive measures should be implemented in the nursing care to reduce the frequency of HAP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2017
Keywords
advanced nursing; hospital-acquired pneumonia; nursing intervention; prevention; surgery
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-138286 (URN)10.1093/intqhc/mzx018 (DOI)000400858300021 ()28339769 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-06-13 Created: 2017-06-13 Last updated: 2018-04-18
Jangland, E., Nyberg, B. & Yngman Uhlin, P. (2017). ‘It’s a matter of patient safety’: understanding challenges in everyday clinical practice for achieving good care on the surgical ward – a qualitative study. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 31(2), 323-331
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘It’s a matter of patient safety’: understanding challenges in everyday clinical practice for achieving good care on the surgical ward – a qualitative study
2017 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 323-331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Surgical care plays an important role in the acute hospital's delivery of safe, high-quality patient care. Although demands for effectiveness are high in surgical wards quality of care and patient safety must also be secured. It is therefore necessary to identify the challenges and barriers linked to quality of care and patient safety with a focus on this specific setting. Aim To explore situations and processes that support or hinder good safe patient care on the surgical ward. Method This qualitative study was based on a strategic sample of 10 department and ward leaders in three hospitals and six surgical wards in Sweden. Repeated reflective interviews were analysed using systematic text condensation. Findings Four themes described the leaders' view of a complex healthcare setting that demands effectiveness and efficiency in moving patients quickly through the healthcare system. Quality of care and patient safety were often hampered factors such as a shift of care level, with critically ill patients cared for without reorganisation of nurses' competencies on the surgical ward. Conclusions There is a gap between what is described in written documents and what is or can be performed in clinical practice to achieve good care and safe care on the surgical ward. A shift in levels of care on the surgical ward without reallocation of the necessary competencies at the patient's bedside show consequences for quality of care and patient safety. This means that surgical wards should consider reviewing their organisation and implementing more advanced nursing roles in direct patient care on all shifts. The ethical issues and the moral stress on nurses who lack the resources and competence to deliver good care according to professional values need to be made more explicit as a part of the patient safety agenda in the surgical ward.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2017
Keywords
patient safety; quality of care; ethics; surgical ward; surgical nursing; leadership; qualitative approaches
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-140984 (URN)10.1111/scs.12350 (DOI)000404644100013 ()27439568 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84979224185 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-09-18 Created: 2017-09-18 Last updated: 2019-05-28Bibliographically approved
Staff, A., Garvin, P., Wiréhn, A.-B. & Yngman Uhlin, P. (2017). Patients requests and needs for culturally and individually adapted supportive care in type 2 diabetes patients A comparative study between Nordic and non-Nordic patients in a social economical vulnerable area of Linkoping, Sweden. Primary Care Diabetes, 11(6), 522-528
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients requests and needs for culturally and individually adapted supportive care in type 2 diabetes patients A comparative study between Nordic and non-Nordic patients in a social economical vulnerable area of Linkoping, Sweden
2017 (English)In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 522-528Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study sought to determine and compare the metabolic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in non-Nordic immigrants and native Nordics. The aim was also to describe and compare the request of supportive care between these two groups. Methods: One hundred and eighty-four patients (n = 184) coming to a routine check-up in a primary healthcare setting (PHC), were consecutively enrolled to the study during a period of one year. Data on therapeutic interventions, clinical measurements, healthcare consumption, and adherence to standard diabetes healthcare program were extracted from the patients medical record. Structured interviews on supportive care were conducted by diabetes trained nurses. If needed, a qualified interpreter was used. Comparisons were made between Nordic patients (n =151) and non-Nordic patients (n = 33). Results: Among T2DM patients in a setting of PHC, there was a difference in meeting the metabolic target HbA1c, between native Nordics and non-Nordic immigrants. There was also a difference in request on supportive care. The non-Nordic group significantly requested more and different supportive care. They also attended the standard diabetes program to a lesser degree. Conclusions: Culturally/individually adapted prevention is not only medically warranted but also requested by the patients themselves. (C) 2017 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2017
Keywords
Diabetes mellitus type 2; Immigration; Metbolic control; Primary healthcare; Supportive care
National Category
General Practice
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-143920 (URN)10.1016/j.pcd.2017.06.006 (DOI)000417663400003 ()28779981 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-29 Created: 2017-12-29 Last updated: 2018-05-02
Yngman Uhlin, P., Fogelberg, A. & Uhlin, F. (2016). Life in standby: hemodialysis patients' experiences of waiting for kidney transplantation.. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 25(1-2), 92-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Life in standby: hemodialysis patients' experiences of waiting for kidney transplantation.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 92-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM AND OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to explore the experiences of hemodialysis patients who are waiting for a kidney transplant.

BACKGROUND: Currently, more than 100,000 persons are waiting for kidney transplantation in the United States. In Sweden, the number is exceeding 600. The waiting period for a deceased donor can be one to three years or even longer in Sweden. This can be challenging, since the patients' situation, with chronic treatment and illness, is burdensome and requires advanced self-care.

DESIGN: This study included a purposeful sample of eight patients (33-53 years old) who had been undergoing hemodialysis treatment for at least six months and were waiting for kidney transplantation.

METHODS: The patients were interviewed, and descriptive content analysis was performed.

RESULTS: Four categories emerged: (1) 'The waiting process,' what thoughts and expectations occur and what to do and how to be prepared for the transplant. (2) 'Awareness that time is running out,' patients felt tied up by treatment and by needing to be available for transplantation, and they had concerns about health. (3) 'Need for communication,' patients described needing support from others and continuous information from the staff. (4) 'Having relief and hope for the future,' patients described how to preserve the hope of being able to participate fully in life once again.

CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals the need for extra attention paid to patients waiting for kidney transplantation. Patients' experiences during the waiting period indicate that pretransplant patients have an increased need to be prepared for the transition and for life post-transplantation.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Dialysis patients on waiting lists must be prepared for the upcoming life change. This includes preserving hope during the waiting period and being mentally prepared for transplantation and a dialysis-free life. A pretransplant education program to prevent medical and psychosocial issues is highly recommended.

Keywords
content analysis; end-stage renal disease; hemodialysis; kidney transplantation; nursing care
National Category
Nursing Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-124011 (URN)10.1111/jocn.12994 (DOI)000368278200008 ()26443674 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-01-18 Created: 2016-01-18 Last updated: 2018-03-27
Yngman Uhlin, P., Klingvall, E., Wilhelmsson, M. & Jangland, E. (2016). Obstacles and opportunities for achieving good care on the surgical ward: nurse and surgeon perspective. Journal of Nursing Management, 24(4), 492-499
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Obstacles and opportunities for achieving good care on the surgical ward: nurse and surgeon perspective
2016 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 492-499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and understand from the perspectives of nurses and surgeons the situations and processes that are important in the context of surgical care support or are obstacles to achieving good care. Background Medical advances and inpatients with multiple illnesses are on the increase. In addition, a high turnover of registered nurses has been identified. This contributes to an increasingly inexperienced nursing staff. Concurrently, studies have shown that patient safety and quality of care are linked to organisational structures and staffing education levels. Method Eight nurses and six surgeons from three hospitals were interviewed and data were analysed by systematic text condensation. Results This identified three themes: shifting focus away from the patients, emphasising good communication, and using the competence of the team. Conclusion This study contributes to a deeper understanding that many interruptions, insufficient communication and unused competence can be a threat to patient safety. Sweden has a high standard but this study elucidates that challenges remain to be resolved. Implications for nursing management The focus on patients can increase by a balance between direct/indirect patient work and administration and by the support of clinicians using their full professional competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2016
Keywords
good care; nurse; qualitative research; quality of care; surgeon; surgical care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-128953 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12349 (DOI)000375780500008 ()26645917 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding Agencies|Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden (FORSS)

Available from: 2016-06-09 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2018-03-22
Lovén Wickman, U., Yngman Uhlin, P., Hjortswang, H., Riegel, B., Stjernman, H. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2016). Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An interview study. Gastroenterology Nursing, 39(2), 121-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: An interview study
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2016 (English)In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic disease of unknown etiology. The disease occurs early in life and the burden of symptoms is significant. Patients need to perform self-care to handle their symptoms, but knowledge about what kind of self-care patients do is limited and these individuals need to learn how to manage the symptoms that arise. The aim of this study was to explore self-care among patients with IBD. Twenty adult patients with IBD, 25-66 years of age, were interviewed. Data were analyzed by performing a qualitative content analysis. Four categories with 10 subcategories emerged from the analysis of the interviews. The self-care patients perform consists of symptom recognition (subcategories: physiological sensations and psychological sensations), handling of symptoms (subcategories: adapting the diet, using medical treatment, stress management, and using complementary alternative medicine), planning life (subcategories: planning for when to do activities and when to refrain from activities), and seeking new options (subcategories: seeking knowledge and personal contacts). Self-care consists of symptom recognition, handling life through planning, and accommodating the existing situation with the ultimate goal of maintaining well-being. Being one step ahead facilitates living with IBD. A decision to actively participate in care of a chronic illness is a prerequisite for self-care. Healthcare professionals must consider patients' potential for and desire for self-care when giving advice on self-care activities. Doing so may help people better cope with IBD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126617 (URN)10.1097/SGA.0000000000000120 (DOI)000377983500007 ()26166423 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding agencies: Medical Research Council of Southeast Sweden-FORSS; County Council of Kalmar; Florence Nightingale Foundation; Ruth and Richard Juhlins foundation

Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2017-05-03Bibliographically approved
Lovén Wickman, U., Riegel, B., Yngman Uhlin, P., Hjortswang, H. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2016). Self-care of inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with better well-being. In: : . Paper presented at 11th Congress of ECCO - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, MArch 16-19, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care of inflammatory bowel disease may be associated with better well-being
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2016 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-126623 (URN)
Conference
11th Congress of ECCO - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, MArch 16-19, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Available from: 2016-03-31 Created: 2016-03-31 Last updated: 2018-12-11
Uhlin, F., Holmar, J., Yngman-Uhlin, P., Fernström, A. & Fridolin, I. (2015). Optical Estimation of Beta 2 Microglobulin during Hemodiafiltration - Does It Work?. Blood Purification, 40(2), 113-119
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Optical Estimation of Beta 2 Microglobulin during Hemodiafiltration - Does It Work?
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2015 (English)In: Blood Purification, ISSN 0253-5068, E-ISSN 1421-9735, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 113-119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Currently, urea reduction seems to be the most widely used dialysis dose parameter. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility to monitor beta 2-microglobulin (β2-M) elimination by utilizing the ultraviolet (UV) absorbance of spent dialysate.

METHODS: Blood and spent dialysate were collected during two week's sessions in 8 patients, one week in hemodialysis (HD) and one in hemodiafiltration (HDF). Correlation analysis between UV-wavelengths and concentrations of solutes in spent dialysate was performed. The reduction ratio (RR) of concentrations in blood, dialysate and UV-absorbance were compared.

RESULTS: Differences between HD and HDF were discovered in wavelength correlation maxima for the solutes. Relative error in RR (%) was larger (p < 0.05) for β2-M than for the other solutes. The most reasonable explanation is that β2-M does not absorb UV-radiation; instead, the absorbance of surrogate substances is measured.

CONCLUSION: A high correlation between UV-absorbance and β2-M can be achieved for HDF but not for HD. Still, UV-absorbance could perhaps be used in solely HDF mode for estimation of β2-M removal. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2015
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-121293 (URN)10.1159/000381797 (DOI)000361154700003 ()26159848 (PubMedID)
Note

Funding text: Estonian Science Foundation [8621]; Estonian Ministry of Education and Research [IUT 19-2]; European Union through the European Regional Development Fund

Available from: 2015-09-14 Created: 2015-09-14 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Lovén Wickman, U., Yngman-Uhlin, P., Hjortswang, H., Riegel, B., Stjernman, H. & Hollman Frisman, G. (2014). Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease - an interview study. In: : . Paper presented at 9th Congress of ECCO - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 20-22 February 2014, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-care among patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease - an interview study
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2014 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
National Category
Clinical Medicine Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:liu:diva-109059 (URN)
Conference
9th Congress of ECCO - Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 20-22 February 2014, Copenhagen, Denmark
Available from: 2014-08-04 Created: 2014-08-04 Last updated: 2015-04-08
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